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KenD500

No more Bubble Ball

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Maybe there is an  unacceptable risk to this activity, and maybe there isn't.  

 

No one here is providing any data to demonstrate that it isn't risky, they're just making assertions.

 

The real problem is that National also isn't providing us any data.  There's this wonderful thing called the internet and hyperlinks.  Surely there's a white paper of some sort that shows what the data is and what they based their decision on, or maybe there isn't and the decision is based on the same emotional basis and unsupported assertions being laid out here for the notion that it's safe.

 

Richard B, you out there anywhere?  Can you give us some actual facts that could help us understand why this is being done.  When you don't trust people with data, they'll assume yours is no better than theirs, and they're as likely to go with their own gut despite your best wishes.  That's the unintended consequence of not trusting your own members.

 

I don't see this as likely.  Even if they had a great study and other data to support their assertion, they wouldn't want all of us to reinterpret the data or question the findings (they are not scientists after all).  So it really comes down to "this is our decision, end of story".

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I don't see this as likely.  Even if they had a great study and other data to support their assertion, they wouldn't want all of us to reinterpret the data or question the findings (they are not scientists after all).  So it really comes down to "this is our decision, end of story".

 

They are not scientists, but you can hire firms to conduct studies and consultants to give you answers who are.... 

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Perhaps:  

 

As one looks at things like orbs

 

One could ask if we have exhausted all possible programs to known to man and need another?  

 

Then someone brings forth an idea.  

 

Perhaps one decides to test said idea out.  

 

As the test progresses you ask yourself things like is this strategic?   For example if you were in the BSA you might ask something like why is this or should this be scouting? 

If you made it that far one might question the risks for a specific program or activity.   But what would that be:   Rolling down hills, off of mountains, across ponds, or just wearing a portable green house in the heat while bouncing off others.     

 

Say you found the "program"  one might look at some details.   Would these orbs be a haven for disease transmission, how would you clean them, is little Timmy going to react to PVC, what happens when you roll to far or fast, what if and waxing hypothetical.   One might also look to see what folks like the CPSC have to say, review high profile incidents involving said orbs.    

 

Then one would ask what is your plan to mitigate or manage those risks.   Is there a solid ROI in this investment of folks time, talent and treasure?  

 

Then some folks decide its a good idea, but its not a great idea.  

 

Somewhere, sometime one might make a decision.     

 

Generally, what follows is questioning of that decision by others.  Perhaps those who question did not have a say in the process, perhaps they may not see a larger playing field, perhaps they have a dog in the hunt already.   

 

Said questioning will come with demands for data / analysis / rolling heads.   

 

All the while it might be as simple as we got bigger fish to catch and fry.   Going to let the little ones go, bait the hook for the big fish, and start the grease getting hot.  

 

But then there will always be a conspiracy.  

 

Happy Wednesday.  

 

Please go recruit a youth into Scouting today, 

 

Richard

 

 

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I love all this total gibberish about risk management and bubble balls.

 

It is far less dangerous than fire building, axe usage,  food allergies, bees, bears, Dutch oven cooking, swimming, whitewater canoeing,rifle shooting, archery, bad weather and riding in the car to get to camp.  

 

I'm glad I'm 65 years of age and will miss out on the next 100 years of scouting.  I'm thinking I will have gotten the better half of the deal anyway.

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It would be easier to recruit kids to Scouting if we didn't have to take the squirt guns out of their hands, forbid them from playing bubble ball or measure their water balloons before they throw them. Just sayin'. ;)

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I saw this last week but since April 1st was Friday I thought maybe it was a hoax.  Apparently not.

 

Bubble-ball similar games have been banned.

 

My first thought is a dumbfounded wow.  I witnessed Bubble-ball at Winter Camp.  The Scouts had fun and they were running around.  The cushion provided by the bubble was ~2 ft thick.

what a riot!

I've seen the ones where a person gets totally inside but not this one.  Looks fun to me.

Nothing worse than a sprained ankle potential as far as I can tell

yikes....act fast before they realize a scout can sprain an ankle while hiking!

 

So what scouting skill, or any skill for that matter, was learned by running around in the latest fad?  Generations of Scouts have gotten along just fine without "bubbleball", I think this generation can get along without it as well.

 

 

for that matter, generations of scouts got along just fine without

cyber chip

stem

and probably a whole bunch of other miserable things I can't think of right now....

so what's the point?

 

oh come on.  It's a game!

it's not ALL about skills and requirements.

there is an element of fun that needs to be mixed in there someplace too.

 

 

What Scouting skills are learned by these? 

  • Dodge ball
  • Log rolling
  • Zip lining
  • Tug of war
  • Tomahawk throwing
  • Knife throwing
  • Go karting
  • Dirt boarding

These are all great activities which have little or nothing to do with actual scout skills but they are AMAZINGLY FUN and why boys join scouts.

 

What other fun things are the adults and lawyers going to take away?

 

You can eat a Snickers in your tent at Philmont and get mauled by a bear (true story), but God forbid that you have fun rolling a human gerbil ball in to your friend in the water.

exactly!

or zombie tag,

and whatever that game the scouts were running around playing at the last camp was.... I can't remember

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I love all this total gibberish about risk management and bubble balls.

 

It is far less dangerous than fire building, axe usage,  food allergies, bees, bears, Dutch oven cooking, swimming, whitewater canoeing,rifle shooting, archery, bad weather and riding in the car to get to camp.  

 

I'm glad I'm 65 years of age and will miss out on the next 100 years of scouting.  I'm thinking I will have gotten the better half of the deal anyway.

"Total gibberish"--that sums up National's explanation quite well.

 

They can use all of the managerial gobbledygook they want.   The bottom line:   they don't understand fun, they don't like the outdoors, and they are afraid of lawsuits.    Stereotypical higher-headquarters group think.

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It would be easier to recruit kids to Scouting if we didn't have to take the squirt guns out of their hands, forbid them from playing bubble ball or measure their water balloons before they throw them. Just sayin'. ;)

 

A recent Sports & Fitness Industry Association Top Line report indicates the top three things folks who wanted to become active (their term is non-participants) in Ages 6 to 24 are Camping, Swimming, Biking.    Pretty sure if you pick up a handbook for the BSA programs we do those - well.    

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A recent Sports & Fitness Industry Association Top Line report indicates the top three things folks who wanted to become active (their term is non-participants) in Ages 6 to 24 are Camping, Swimming, Biking.    Pretty sure if you pick up a handbook for the BSA programs we do those - well.    

Consider the intangible optics of the organization as well:   the BSA does not permit water guns, water balloons, nor bubble ball.   Nor a bunch of other things that millions of people do every day without injury to body or soul.

 

Outside the hallowed halls of Irving TX, people size up an organization on such matters, for good or ill.    

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A recent Sports & Fitness Industry Association Top Line report indicates the top three things folks who wanted to become active (their term is non-participants) in Ages 6 to 24 are Camping, Swimming, Biking.    Pretty sure if you pick up a handbook for the BSA programs we do those - well.    

 

...and if BSA had it's finger properly on the pulse of the youth of today we wouldn't be hemorrhaging membership at the rate of 6% year on year.

 

Yes, Scouting does camping fine. That's mostly local unit stuff though. Eleven months out of the year the camping program is defined by guys like me, @@Stosh, @@CalicoPenn and others working with our boys to develop a monthly program that is fun.

 

That one month out of the year that kids go to summer camp is their "Disney Vacation". They don't want to simply "camp", they want the camping equivalent of "Space Mountain". They want the water front. Oh wait, that has one of those big, bouncy things that launches guys WAY in to the air! That's far more dangerous than Bubble Ball.

 

BSA should be looking for ways to entice kids to join, not limit what they can do for silly reasons. Why is Bubble Ball more dangerous than anything else we do? Because when you prohibit something you should explain why...and the reason should be a good one. BSA should be supporting units, districts and councils who are trying to create that "wow factor" for kids to entice them to join Scouts AND keep them coming back. Eliminating something that is obviously fun -- and not so obviously inherently dangerous -- does not achieve that goal.

Edited by Krampus
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Consider the intangible optics of the organization as well:   the BSA does not permit water guns, water balloons, nor bubble ball.   Nor a bunch of other things that millions of people do every day without injury to body or soul.

 

Outside the hallowed halls of Irving TX, people size up an organization on such matters, for good or ill.    

 

I understand your frustration, but I highly doubt perspective cub scouts or their parents are aware of such legalistic fine print rules. Lets not run away with hyperbole.

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I understand your frustration, but I highly doubt perspective cub scouts or their parents are aware of such legalistic fine print rules. Lets not run away with hyperbole.

Sentinel, here's what I was trying to say:   non-scouters have ridiculed the BSA for its play-it-safe decisions.   And if the parents and kids aren't aware of the rules before they join, they'll find out pretty quick shortly thereafter.  

 

Let's recall that the water gun/balloon ban was not fine print--it was front/center on many major media outlets.   Public response, by and large, was "you've gotta be kidding me, no water guns?"

 

People join organizations because of like interests and mindsets.   Decisions by National not only impact perspective kids and parents, but those already registered as well.   They'll vote with their feet.

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We promise them adventure and fun and then take away their water guns.

 

That's seriously got to be the dumbest thing that ever came along.  Sane people can't even make this stuff up as a joke.

Edited by Stosh
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I understand your frustration, but I highly doubt perspective cub scouts or their parents are aware of such legalistic fine print rules. Lets not run away with hyperbole.

6% membership decline is fact. Kids wanting fun is fact. Banning a perfectly good activity for no good reason is fact.

 

Hyperbole is expecting rational people to understand an irrational decision and like it.

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