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yastreb

1960's uniform questions.

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Trained patches were also much later, although the position patch did come with a mylar border for a brief time in the 70s to indicate "Trained" status.

Interestingly, in my search for something else, I did run across this Trained strip. The site says it's from the 50's, but I'm assuming it wasn't that common as this is the only reference I have ever seen to one. I've actually been using the "newer" mylar patch since I started as an ASM. I've worn it for years and nobody has commented on its shininess, or it being green.

 

During my years in Scouting and in my "real job", I've found that the best way to become proficient in a subject is to prepare a lesson plan and teach it.  Why not conduct your own "Brownsea" (or whatever your Council calls the T-2-1 training camp) at the unit level?  Of course, this should be conducted by the senior scouts, coached by the adult leaders.  I can't tell you how many times I've seen a Scout at an upper level BOR who hasn't retained the basic First Class skills (not that it's a retest!).

That's a good idea, thanks! We usually try to get new scouts up to near First Class level before summer camp but haven't done an organized program like our camp's own program. (Our camp, and several out-of-council camps I've been to call it Brownsea, I wasn't aware of other names for it.) We're trying to recruit, so I hope we can give it a try sometime. Right now we don't have many active scouts, our senior scout is Second Class, so he's almost ready. But, you're right, the best way to learn and retain something is to teach it to someone else. It just seems to me having them retain it from week to week is difficult enough, let alone to their upper-level ranks! I wonder if this is why the Scoutmaster is trying to train their memories using Kim's game.

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Making any learning into a game makes the learning more attractive to most boys.  

 

"Interestingly, in my search for something else, I did run across this Trained strip. The site says it's from the 50's, but I'm assuming it wasn't that common as this is the only reference I have ever seen to one. I've actually been using the "newer" mylar patch since I started as an ASM. I've worn it for years and nobody has commented on its shininess, or it being green."

 

Those segments, worn directly below the badge of office on the left sleeve, were still around in 1970 and cost $.10.

Edited by TAHAWK

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One thought:  My Tenderfoot - Star patches were rectangles.  My Life patch was a heart.

It was a heart - after it was mounted on an OD rectangle.  Some troops opted for a large enamel Heart pin (not as large as the cloth Heart).

Edited by TAHAWK

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My grandfather completed his Eagle at age 38, as an ASM in 1947, Buffalo, NY. Other pictures  show him as a youth Life Scout in approximately 1922-1925.

My father earned his two years later.  The 1949 COH* picture I have of them shows the elder wearing his Eagle rank patch and medal on his ASM uniform.

* All council COH, 7 Eagles awarded, 8 Silver Beavers, Numerous Scouter's Keys, an elaborate "Strengthen the Arm of Liberty" campaign kick off, and 1700 in attendance.

Any idea what the diamond-shaped patch would be on the adult's right sleeve near the cuff?

DSJ_FOS_Easgle picture.pdf

 

Edited by WRW_57

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There was a patch that size and shape with an owl - predominately blue -  that was given in some councils as a symbol that the Scouter had completed basic training for his position.  Some councils wore it on the sleeve, others on the bottom point of the right pocket.

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Thank you, Tahawk. 

 

Does anyone have a picture of this patch?

Edited by WRW_57

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Mystery solved. It's an adult five-year veteran patch, used from 1945 to 1953. This fits with the 1949 picture, above.

V5-cut-out-ft.jpg

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On ‎3‎/‎8‎/‎2016 at 2:24 PM, NJCubScouter said:

As a youth, I recall I had a shirt with a collar, and then a shirt without a collar, which said above the pocket "Scouts BSA" instead of "Boy Scouts of America", which led some to speculate about a possible merger with GSUSA.

The Scouts BSA shirt was a 70's shirt. (did not stay in circulation very long)  I have one hanging in my closet.

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On ‎3‎/‎14‎/‎2016 at 11:17 AM, TAHAWK said:

It was a heart - after it was mounted on an OD rectangle

I have my Life patch (1970) on a vest.  It was indeed just a heart, no OD rectangle or square like the other rank patches of the era.  Much tougher to hand sew and keep it straight.

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On ‎3‎/‎6‎/‎2016 at 10:04 PM, yastreb said:

I've tried to attach a picture of one of the uniforms in question if anyone is curious

Based on the picture you attached, this is more likely a 70's shirt.

While I no longer have my very first uniform, (from 1964) I do know that it was a much heavier material than the one shown.  The 60's shirt I first wore also had a wide pleat in the middle of the pockets which made it real fun when sewing on patches.

You do not seem to have gotten uniform pants along with the shirts.  If you had, the 60's pants had the button down flaps with red piping.

We do see a few camp staff wearing the 70's uniforms here, with a pretty fair number wearing the older 80's pants/shorts with either the original tan Oscar De Laurenta shirts or the current one.  I wore my 60's uniform to Cub Scout Day Camp this year, and got quite a few comments from the boys on how much they liked the old style.

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