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Rick_in_CA

Helicopter parenting is damaging kids

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How to pack is done by the PL or APL using the gear list in the handbook. Each campout the PL has each scout present his pack to him to ensure he has everything.

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Just a story... I had a SMC with a scout last night. Long story short is mom won't let him go on a campout with water because of some fear she has that he'll drown. I talked to her afterward and she knows it's irrational.  I told her she needs to get over it because his son shows huge promise that will be wasted if she doesn't. What I didn't tell her is she needs to start letting go or her son will suffer. But this is just one kid. Maybe 10% of the parents are like this.

 

Just an observation...  The title Eagle scout does not mean a parent understands scouts. It likely means he understands the outdoors. We created a survey for learning about the parents, what they need, and how they can help. There are a number of parents with outdoor experience that we need to make a relationship with. I don't need half the adults like that. 20% would be fantastic. 10% would be fine. It used to be they just came out of the crowd and started helping out. That is no longer the case for our troop. I do have hope for my troop although I was getting depressed a month ago until I started seeing some of the results of the survey. But absolutely, training these adults is important and non trivial. I get no help from the council.

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@@MattR we have the same issue with shooting sports. Some parents just can't let go. We invite them to come and see everything in action. Oddly enough, a few of these parents are the ones that let their kids play near busy, 45 mph streets where their kids wear headphones and skate down the street with traffic. 

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Up until the late 1990s, our resident camp program (Massawepie SC) ended and started on the same day. Massawepie is on a 4000 acre reservation, in the middle of the Adirondack Park. Staff's day off was Tuesday into Wednesday. Campers left before lunch on Saturday, and the new troops arrived after lunch on Saturday. This was possible because all troops participated in "trail day". Basically, you arrived at camp Saturday after lunch, and Tuesday afternoon you went camping as a troop anywhere you wanted somewhere on the reservation. You came back Wednesday lunch time, then left camp Saturday lunch time. While the troops were out camping on the reservation Tuesday through Wednesday we all went on day off. One weekend, a scout got hurt out on trail. Mind you, all supervision rules were followed in the GSS, troop leadership was adequate in number and in training, However, NY State came in and said, "where was adult supervision." We showed that the adult leaders where there and trained. "No those are campers. Where was adult supervision?" Oh you mean the staff, they are on their day off, the adult leaders are supervising their scouts...NY State "No they don't count. This accident happened because you neglected to provide supervision." Thus ended a 50-year program feature and tradition of MSC in one evening. Now, most Scouts at our 4000 acre camp have never set foot a football field farther than the dining hall. Most of the amazing outposts are overgrown. But, everyone is so much safer (eye-roll).

Edited by skyfiiire

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@@skyfiiire that's an example of the Nanny State in action. Somewhere they forgot the Constitution and that, when you reach 18, you're an adult and can make your own decisions.

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Parents not letting kids pack for themselves drives me mad. On every camp there is always one kid who has not brought something because mum decided he didn't need it.

 

A camp back in July we had a 10 year old scout turn up with only a pair of trainers (what you'd call sneekers??) for his feet because the weather forecast was warm and dry, so mum decided that the recommended boots or trail shoes weren't necessary. Shame about the on and off rain we'd had for a couple of weeks before hand leaving the large patches of mud and standing water.

 

That kid had a very uncomfortable weekend.

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Who has the time to think this stuff up?   (I was nice, I used the word "stuff" like the moderators taught me.)

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That is depressing. The worst part is this quote: â€œEvery school is looking for a way to increase student activity and engagement and decrease conflict,†he said. We wonder why some kids have trouble resolving conflict. It's because they aren't allowed to have any type of conflict, so they can't learn to resolve it. When my son was in elementary school, they banned games of tag and any running at recess. Some kids might lose and feel bad. Some kids don't run as fast as others and might feel bad. Yikes.

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That is depressing. The worst part is this quote: â€œEvery school is looking for a way to increase student activity and engagement and decrease conflict,†he said. We wonder why some kids have trouble resolving conflict. It's because they aren't allowed to have any type of conflict, so they can't learn to resolve it. When my son was in elementary school, they banned games of tag and any running at recess. Some kids might lose and feel bad. Some kids don't run as fast as others and might feel bad. Yikes.[/size]

I also blame organized kids sports. With adults organizing everything and acting as the umpires, referees, etc... kids dont get the chance to mix up their own teams at the playground, or neighborhoid park. When johny has to go home, teams used to just swap players to keep it even. When a dispute started, "do over" was a common means to address it. Without these playful opportunities and deference to adults in all manners, it is no wonder they do not debelop any dispute management skills. Well actually they do... they learn quickly that the adult is the only one to decide and they cant make their own choices.

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