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Eamonn

Stand up Paddle Boarding ?

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I'm wondering if anyone has tried stand-up Paddle Boarding?

Next month we are touring some of the New England states.

I have been looking at some of the L.L Bean Adventure School day long courses that introduce paddle boarding.

In the past I have done a fair amount of kayaking and sea kayaking. I really enjoy being out on the water in or on just about anything that floats.

My thinking is that where I live we have access to a lot of rivers and just spending a day out would be fun.

It really doesn't seem that expensive. For about $1,000, I'd be ready to go.

 

I'm thinking that some of the inflatable boards would be something that I could have in the trunk and wouldn't have that much hassle setting up.

I would welcome any advise, wise words or hearing what your experience's might be.

I'm not looking or thinking about a surf board. Maybe one that I could stow some gear on if I decide to take off for a multi-day trip?

Many Thanks,

Eamonn    

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After kayaking on lakes and a little in the marine environment, I gave it a try and decided to stick with kayaking. I like the ability to pack gear and sit low. Far better control and efficiency of transfer of power from body to paddle to water. Paddleboarding is a little like trying to surfboard without waves. I just didn't think it was any fun at all.

I also have acquaintances who pole canoes down rivers. I don't like to do that either, I'd rather sit braced for control.

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I have one relative who does yoga instruction on a paddle board. Whales and dolphins seem to be quite amused by the sight!

 

The rest of my family, when they rent watercraft, only grab the paddleboard maybe 1 once for every 5 times they opt for kayaks!

Edited by qwazse

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I have used them a fair amount --- they're primarily toys, not any kind of substitute for a kayak or canoe if you're thinking of really going anywhere.  A really high end one will have a way to strap a small dry bag on the bow, other than that you're not going to have anything with you except maybe water, and very few even have a place for a water bottle so you need to have a hydration pack.  

 

My brother said about them, "what do they do that something else doesn't already do better?"  The answer is nothing.  They are a good way to get in a paddle workout if you want a change up from a kayak or canoe.  By the same token they're a slightly different way to paddle anywhere just as a change from kayaks or canoes.

 

As I think about it, like Qwazse I have a niece who does yoga and gymnastics on a board in San Diego bay.  I really don't think you could do that in a kayak (OK maybe you could or she could, I can't even do that stuff on dry land), but clearly a flat board is superior to round bottom vessel for that. 

 

The caveat to all this is that my experience has been on lakes and bays; I have seen videos of people paddling into surf with them, but I've never had one in any kind of wave action, let alone the surf.

 

I think the best analogy would be that paddle boards are to kayaks as wind surfers are to day sailers. They're fun and if you have the cash for a hobby there are worse ways to spend it.

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Yoga?

No I don't think so.

I

m thinking that an inflatable board would be easy to transport.

The idea of just standing on the river watching the world go by is appealing.

I enjoy kayaking a lot but it can be a real chore and lately I'm finding that it really takes a toll on my back.

Eamonn 

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"Paddle Boarding"   

You do realize that corporale  punishment is against BSA rules?   Oh , wait...

 

Well, maybe for some of us older folks it would be ...

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Recommend you take an intro class, learn some strokes and find a retailer that has a demo day and try out several types, shapes, etc.  There are many options. The "yoga" boards are wide, the racing boards narrow.  As a general rule, longer is faster.  Lots of surface finish options.    Bought a couple of demos - Hobie ATR (12-14'?) and an 11' ATR-II.  Really light and handle well.   

 

Don't have the desire to manage an inflatable, I could see that as a popular option if transport options were limited but they are not quick set ups.  

 

My use is mostly lakes, but have taken them to the coast a time or two.   Great core workout, if you want your core strong to prevent the backache this will do it.  The yoga might also help.  

 

You can sit, stand or kneel on them.   Wind loading plays a large role in your paddle experience.   

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Surfing without waves sounds about as much fun as kayaking in the backyard.   :)

 

Paddleboarding is nothing like surfing on flat water. It's more like kayaking while standing up. The great thing about it is that it's much better for observing wildlife than a kayak, especially if the water is clear. 

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I'm wondering if anyone has tried stand-up Paddle Boarding?

Next month we are touring some of the New England states.

I have been looking at some of the L.L Bean Adventure School day long courses that introduce paddle boarding.

In the past I have done a fair amount of kayaking and sea kayaking. I really enjoy being out on the water in or on just about anything that floats.

My thinking is that where I live we have access to a lot of rivers and just spending a day out would be fun.

It really doesn't seem that expensive. For about $1,000, I'd be ready to go.

 

I'm thinking that some of the inflatable boards would be something that I could have in the trunk and wouldn't have that much hassle setting up.

I would welcome any advise, wise words or hearing what your experience's might be.

I'm not looking or thinking about a surf board. Maybe one that I could stow some gear on if I decide to take off for a multi-day trip?

Many Thanks,

Eamonn    

 

I've tried it. It's fun, but it's a real work out.  It would be hard to stow enough gear for a multi-day trip. 

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I have used them a fair amount --- they're primarily toys, not any kind of substitute for a kayak or canoe if you're thinking of really going anywhere.  A really high end one will have a way to strap a small dry bag on the bow, other than that you're not going to have anything with you except maybe water, and very few even have a place for a water bottle so you need to have a hydration pack.  

 

My brother said about them, "what do they do that something else doesn't already do better?"  The answer is nothing.  They are a good way to get in a paddle workout if you want a change up from a kayak or canoe.  By the same token they're a slightly different way to paddle anywhere just as a change from kayaks or canoes.

 

As I think about it, like Qwazse I have a niece who does yoga and gymnastics on a board in San Diego bay.  I really don't think you could do that in a kayak (OK maybe you could or she could, I can't even do that stuff on dry land), but clearly a flat board is superior to round bottom vessel for that. 

 

The caveat to all this is that my experience has been on lakes and bays; I have seen videos of people paddling into surf with them, but I've never had one in any kind of wave action, let alone the surf.

 

I think the best analogy would be that paddle boards are to kayaks as wind surfers are to day sailers. They're fun and if you have the cash for a hobby there are worse ways to spend it.

 

Well, I have camped from one.  I have a 30-L or so dry bag, and I packed my hammock, a tarp, a sheet (it was hot), and a backpacking stove with pot. Carried my food in a separate cooler.  I wouldn't want to do a multi-day, but not bad for overnight. 

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t doesn't sound a whole lot different than stand-up canoeing.  At least with canoeing one can have a bit more cargo.

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My wife has one. We also have kayaks and canoes. The SUP is not a watercraft. It is a water toy. It has many variations and could be used to transport but that is not its design nor function. It is for recreating on the water, not for transport of people or gear. Sure it can be used, and probably is but only in perfect conditions. One should not be traveling on water in a vessel which requires only perfect conditions. Like almost all things, choose the right tool for the job.

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I haven't tried it, but I have a friend that does it.

 

I used to kayak, but have little interest in the paddle board, but it does seem maybe just a tiny bit simpler (less stuff) than a kayak....

It looks to me like more of a novelty because the folks I have seen doing it are going no place in a hurry.  

 

Probably a great balance workout though..... something most of us could use for sure....

 

I can think of another possible advantage over a kayak ..... and that is the higher perspective.  Might be better for wildlife viewing.... paddling along the shore quietly.

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I haven't tried it, but I have a friend that does it.

 

I used to kayak, but have little interest in the paddle board, but it does seem maybe just a tiny bit simpler (less stuff) than a kayak....

It looks to me like more of a novelty because the folks I have seen doing it are going no place in a hurry.  

 

Probably a great balance workout though..... something most of us could use for sure....

 

I can think of another possible advantage over a kayak ..... and that is the higher perspective.  Might be better for wildlife viewing.... paddling along the shore quietly.

 

My general observation is that a paddleboard is more for the equivalent of day hiking.  Can't carry much, but it's fun to do.  On flat water, it's a much better perspective for wildlife viewing, especially if the water is fairly clear.  Eyes at almost 6' above water have a much better vantage point than eyes at 3' above the water, and if the water is clear, you can see a lot more under the water than in a kayak.  It's a better workout than a kayak. The strange thing is that, at least for me, the part of my body worked hardest on a paddleboard is my ankles--due to the balancing, and the fact that all the power to move the board goes through the whole body and ends up at the feet. 

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