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Neckerchief Other Than With The Uniform

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Use the necker to denote "I am a Scout".  Wear it around your neck.  Formal occasions, make a neat woggle to hold it neatly, wear it UNDER or OVER the shirt collar, as your Troop decides, so there is some "uniformity" among the uniforms. Do not wear it "informally" on formal occasions.  .  Informal occasions, tie a "friendship knot" and wrap it around your neck.  Trips to the zoo or the museum or the USS Whatever,  wear your ScoutTshirt with the Troop necker so we can see the Troop at a distance among all the regular tourists.  Take several with you to the Jamboree, trade them with your new Scout friends.  Wear several as you collect more friends.  Years later, Use them to jog your memory and think about them. 

Learn to use the necker as a bandage, sling, emergency lashing, horse halter (old manual!), sun shade, signal flag, etc.  Mine from 40 years ago has holes in it from first aid practice, but it is clean and ironed and resides in the ziplock bag in the shoe box in my closet with the other 15  or so neckers from various places and persons. 

 

Good Scouting to you!

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Commemorative neckers used to be as popular as today's t-shirts.  I have a whole box of them from years past.  I even have my original BSA Red/Yellow necker from when I was a kid. 

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August 1st is World Scout Scarf Day. What a great opportunity to wear our neckerchief with our everyday clothes in solidarity with scouts around the world. I love neckerchiefs, especially the old full-squares. I have collected dozens of them in all colors - and conditions.

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I learned a long time ago to wear a necker on a regular basis.  I have to mow the lawn today (about an acre and I have a push mower) and it's gonna be hot.  A necker soaked every half hour and wrapped around the neck is a God-send.  I have never used the necker just as ornamental,   

 

When I was doing Civil War reenacting I made square neckers/bandanas.  36" square, hemmed off.  They were my towel, my wash cloth, my cooking hot pad (never make coffee in a tin cup on the fire without a hot pad handy), my coolant (soaked with water and wrapped around the neck), my brass polisher, and my ice protector (put ice in your hat, toss in the necker so the ice doesn't come in direct contact with the skin and let it run down your face and neck all afternoon) I give full credit to the necker that allowed me to stay on the field wearing a heavy wool uniform with temperatures well over 100 and head indexes well into the 120's.  I had only one adult under my command go down from heat.  By the time I got to him, others had already filled neckers with ice and had jammed his coat with them.  The rest of the company had dumped their canteens on him.  He was awake and lucid before the medics could reach him.  The fella who went down did not use a necker, but I never saw him without one after that.

 

There's a reason for neckers and they are not there to just look good with the uniform.

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Commemorative neckers used to be as popular as today's t-shirts.  I have a whole box of them from years past.  I even have my original BSA Red/Yellow necker from when I was a kid. 

I have my old bicentennial necker from when I was a cub scout

Like this one (this isn't mine, just an image I found online)

il_340x270.709166122_nl3q.jpg

and I have my matching liberty bell woggle too, similar to this one

mUi91mm4fM_1q5DGxybnyaA.jpg

 

I've worn them several times recently, and was surprised that I NEVER had anyone.... cub or adult.... ask about them.

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In Various Countries around the World...Scouters wearing Neckers are given free transportation or very cheap rates on Public Transportation and discounts at Hostels  

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I began Scouting in 1959, our Aussie uniform was the khaki, neckers (scarves to us) were worn with the collarless shirt, shorts for all, long socks with troop colour knitted sock tops and lemon-squeezer hat (great for the Aussie sun). I found this uniform ideal even for the two years I spent in Singapore/Malaya. We were quite happy to wear the scarf as an identifier when out of uniform. One item of clothing we did have in those years was a 'campfire shirt' on which we sewed our collected/swapped badges, the shirt was in troop colours and was very personalised....we did stick to the collarless style and the scarf was often worn with the shirt. I can't say I like the uniforms of today....the boys on troop nights always looked smart and appreciated the inherent comfort of same. Our troop was always recognisable when in company of large groups of scouts/non-scouts.

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Because my necker doesn't have a BSA symbol/logo on it, I wear it anyway.  Been doing it for years.

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just visited Bryan on Scouting for the first time in a long while

top headline was just the topic of this thread!

 

I was thinking.....

now all we need is

1) co-ed

2) a Chief Scout that does cool stuff like flipping out of helicopters and rappelling down cliffs on TV

 

and then we'll be a lot more like the Brits!

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Can see the uniform police now.  They will yell about the way it is rolled, the type of slide and the slides position or if there is a slide at all, or too short or too long, or crooked, or not an "official" one with a FDL or other specifically Scout related symbol, and whether on a collared shirt it is under or over the collar. Surely, they will find more stuff that does not come to mind too.  Should be lots of fun to sit back and watch and listen. :D:laugh:   

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... Surely, they will find more stuff that does not come to mind too.  ...

 

As in multiple neckers linked with one friendship knot?

 

My friend who raised her boys in eastern Europe tells me she thinks it's her favorite look on the scouts.

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I am aware on no unit around here where the Scouts do not wear neckerchiefs.   In some units, the adults do not wear them.

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I am aware on no unit around here where the Scouts do not wear neckerchiefs.   In some units, the adults do not wear them.

Interesting. You couldn't pay the kids here to wear them. Uniform is ball caps, not neckerchiefs.

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