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SeattlePioneer

The New Cub Scout Program

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Well,  I got the new Tiger Handbook a few days ago and have looked through it.

 

In my view,  the existing Tiger Cub program is the best part of the Cub Scout program.  It has an emphasis on adventure and simple styraighforward requirements to win the Bobcat and Tiger Cub Badge (by and large). I've been the Tiger Cub Den Leader for eight years.

 

The new Tigwer program IS WORSE IN EVERY WAY in my opinion,  I regret to say.   I will no longer be a Cub Scout Den Leader or Cubmaster.  

 

Requirements are much too detailed.  The environmentalists have taken over the program and kicked out the emphasis on hiking, camping and having fun for boys.

 

No doubt some boys will enjoy studying a one square foot of ground extensively (Backyard Jungle),  but not many.  And not me.

 

And in the current program,  I can copy off the badge achievements in a page for parents in this low income area who don't want to spend money for a handbook.  In the new program, spending $13 (including sales tax) would seem to be pretty necessary if you are going to follow the program.

 

My first bias would be to NOT adopt the new program,  but for the pack or den leader to continue with the old Tiger Cub program with a modification or two.    And to give parents who WANT to do that program to do it if they wish.

 

But frankly,  my first impression is that I'M OUTA HERE as far as being a program leader.

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so you're gonna quit based solely on the new program?

come on.... Really?

 

almost 4,000 posts here, so i can tell you are an active scouter

is it honestly that bad.... or is there some burn out or other things going on here?

Edited by blw2

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so you're gonna quit based solely on the new program?

come on.... Really?

 

almost 4,000 posts here, so i can tell you are an active scouter

is it honestly that bad.... or is there some burn out or other things going on here?

Sooner or later everybody hits there "i'm done" level it's just different for each of us.

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Sooner or later everybody hits there "i'm done" level it's just different for each of us.

 

oh yes, I've hit it at least 4 times since my son was a tiger.... then I keep bouncing back  :confused:

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The environmentalists have taken over the program and kicked out the emphasis on hiking, camping and having fun for boys.

 

 

 

As an environmentalist/conservationist, I would respectfully ask you to cite some examples as to how my people  :D have mucked up the Tiger program.

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Here's the "Backyard Jungle" requirements.

 

http://scoutermom.com/achievement/tiger-adventure-requirements-backyard-jungle/

 

 

 

This is for Tigers (1st graders)

 

FAR too detailed,  in my view.  Making a determined effort to pitch boys on environmentalist values ---- such politics should not be controlling the Scout program,  in my view.

 

And I'll bet plenty of boys (and parents) would find this BORING. 

 

I certainly do.

 

 

In Scouting I aim to do things I  WANT TO DO or am INTERESTED IN DOING.   The new Tiger program doesn't qualify for me on either count.

 

I have more objections,  too. 

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I know I went over AQUATICS last week at CS RT and the changes to boating for Cubs ( FYI Pack and Dens can now conduct boating activities, and not just row boat but sailboats, canoes, powerboats, and kayaks on flat water, as long as Safe Swim Defense and Safety AFloat are followed)

 

One of the  CMs asked me what the Scout Water Chant was and I had to tell him I had no idea as that is a new thing. When I read it, had to agree it was awfully complicated.

 

The good news is that the Cub Scout Standard of "Do Your Best" applies.

 

But like SP, I am also stepping down as a DL after 6 years, and moving to the pack committee. Not only am I burning out on Cub Scouts, but my son's troop needs help. Found out they are getting a new SM effective June 1, and with his work schedule he will need back up. So I'm switching from troop committee to ASM.

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oh yes, I've hit it at least 4 times since my son was a tiger.... then I keep bouncing back  :confused:

i guess this is the wrong discussion to mention how I think the tiger program has wreck the whole BSA program. Until the BSA aloud gay scouts, Tigers was the number one cause of cub adults and scouts quitting. I saw the problem back in 1995; it's just Seattles last straw.

 

Barry

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Here's the "Backyard Jungle" requirements.

 

http://scoutermom.com/achievement/tiger-adventure-requirements-backyard-jungle/

 

 

 

This is for Tigers (1st graders)

 

FAR too detailed,  in my view.  Making a determined effort to pitch boys on environmentalist values ---- such politics should not be controlling the Scout program,  in my view.

 

And I'll bet plenty of boys (and parents) would find this BORING. 

 

I certainly do.

 

 

In Scouting I aim to do things I  WANT TO DO or am INTERESTED IN DOING.   The new Tiger program doesn't qualify for me on either count.

 

I have more objections,  too. 

 

Requirements for the Backyard Jungle Tiger Adventure
  1. Take a 1-foot hike. Make a list of the living things you find on your 1-foot hike.
  2. Point out two different kinds of birds that live in your area.
  3. Be helpful to plants and animals by planting a tree or other plant in your neighborhood.
  4. Build and hang a birdhouse.
  5.  With your adult partner, go on a walk, and pick out two sounds you hear in your “jungle.â€

So THIS Is politically-motivated and boring, huh?   :D I guess I just don't see it that way...

 

I was raised in the woods by two bird-watching grandparents and I "helped" (I was three) my grandpa build a cabin near Tim's Ford Lake in Tullahoma, TN. Planting trees, looking at birds, hanging birdhouses, and listening to wildlife has nothing to do with politics.

 

While I can understand being annoyed with having to change the requirements and learn a new program, I just don't think "the environmentalists" have come in to mess things up for you or Tiger leaders across America.  

 

Sorry to jump on you, Seattle.  :D

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i guess this is the wrong discussion to mention how I think the tiger program has wreck the whole BSA program. Until the BSA aloud gay scouts, Tigers was the number one cause of cub adults and scouts quitting. I saw the problem back in 1995; it's just Seattles last straw.

 

Barry

 

Care to explain how the Tiger program has hurt scouting?  Our pack has had nothing but good experiences with it.

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Well,  I got the new Tiger Handbook a few days ago and have looked through it.

 

In my view,  the existing Tiger Cub program is the best part of the Cub Scout program.  It has an emphasis on adventure and simple styraighforward requirements to win the Bobcat and Tiger Cub Badge (by and large). I've been the Tiger Cub Den Leader for eight years.

 

The new Tigwer program IS WORSE IN EVERY WAY in my opinion,  I regret to say.   I will no longer be a Cub Scout Den Leader or Cubmaster.  

 

Requirements are much too detailed.  The environmentalists have taken over the program and kicked out the emphasis on hiking, camping and having fun for boys.

 

No doubt some boys will enjoy studying a one square foot of ground extensively (Backyard Jungle),  but not many.  And not me.

 

And in the current program,  I can copy off the badge achievements in a page for parents in this low income area who don't want to spend money for a handbook.  In the new program, spending $13 (including sales tax) would seem to be pretty necessary if you are going to follow the program.

 

My first bias would be to NOT adopt the new program,  but for the pack or den leader to continue with the old Tiger Cub program with a modification or two.    And to give parents who WANT to do that program to do it if they wish.

 

But frankly,  my first impression is that I'M OUTA HERE as far as being a program leader.

 

I'm sorry but I don't get the criticism of any environmentalist influence on scouting.  (Nor do I even see it.)  And I especially don't see it as conflicting with camping, hiking, or other outdoor activities.  Do I need to remind you of Leave No Trace?  That is the definition of environmentalism. 

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Green Bar Bill Says:

“One of the greatest Good Turns that each of us can do for America today and for all the future is to wake up to the importance of conservation—to become conservation-minded and to learn to use our country’s natural wealth in the wisest possible manner, for the greatest good to the greatest number of people.

To a lot of fellows the word ‘conservation’ means ‘plant a tree,’ and little else. But to a fellow who really knows, conservation of our natural resources has a lot of meanings. They cover the whole range from the way you act in the outdoors when you’re hiking or camping to the projects you can undertake in the fields of soil and water conservation, in forestry and wildlife management.â€

Boys’ Life, May, 1963

 

Teaching our Tigers the value of the natural world around them--at age six--will instill in them the values that Bill stressed 50 years ago.

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The 1 foot hike is interesting.

I used to do a lot of scuba diving.

This was a suggested thing to do on a dive.

 

I tried it occasionally.  I was an advanced diver with high level tech certs, and I enjoyed the more difficult dives.... something with a challenge.

But when diving off a commercial charter boat, the 2nd dive is often planned as a shallow and easy dive.

I used to dive down, and blow through the dive thinking it was boring.

On occasion, I would dive down under the boat and find a good lively head of coral.... just spend the whole dive, or at least a long while just there relaxing.  It can be quite amazing what you don't see until you stop and look for a while.

 

I'll bet the 1ft hike might be good and boring in my backyard for example... where you'll find well grass, and not much else since my monthly lawn service kills all the bugs.....

but if you take the scouts to a location out of their normal experience.... someplace with lots of life and variety a wetlands area, maybe someplace along the shore.... a tidal pool, or a rock jetty or riprap, under a pier, in or near a little creek, etc.....

and then stake out a small area to keep the wandering minds contained (maye it's a 3ft x 3ft area, close enough).... I think you might be surprised that this isn't necessarily a bad idea.

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The 1 foot hike is interesting.

I used to do a lot of scuba diving.

This was a suggested thing to do on a dive.

 

I tried it occasionally.  I was an advanced diver with high level tech certs, and I enjoyed the more difficult dives.... something with a challenge.

But when diving off a commercial charter boat, the 2nd dive is often planned as a shallow and easy dive.

I used to dive down, and blow through the dive thinking it was boring.

On occasion, I would dive down under the boat and find a good lively head of coral.... just spend the whole dive, or at least a long while just there relaxing.  It can be quite amazing what you don't see until you stop and look for a while.

 

I'll bet the 1ft hike might be good and boring in my backyard for example... where you'll find well grass, and not much else since my monthly lawn service kills all the bugs.....

but if you take the scouts to a location out of their normal experience.... someplace with lots of life and variety a wetlands area, maybe someplace along the shore.... a tidal pool, or a rock jetty or riprap, under a pier, in or near a little creek, etc.....

and then stake out a small area to keep the wandering minds contained (maye it's a 3ft x 3ft area, close enough).... I think you might be surprised that this isn't necessarily a bad idea.

Fully agree.  A 1 foot hike might sound incredibly boring and useless to an adult, but to a first grader it's a great way to both open their minds to the world of the outdoors (when all too many have their lives revolve around the indoors and electronics) and to trigger their imaginations.

 

Say that 1 foot hike reveals...

-A feather: that leads to speculating about the life and experiences of the bird it came from.

-A pointy rock: Is it an old Indian arrowhead?

-A white rock: dinosaur bone?

-And so on...

 

Have you ever seen a young kid find a bug or worm?  If so, then you've seen the places such a find can lead them - real or imaginary.

 

The minds of young kids are so much more creative than adults because they are not yet bound by preconceived notions and norms.  They see things adults can't even fathom.  Who cares if 90% of what they come up with is not realistic or plausible.  The remaining 10% is pure magic...

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