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jpstodwftexas

Mini Trailers As Chuckboxes

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I had a thought awhile back...I was gonna Build a Chuck box on a Small Trailer..Getting to old to Carry one..Plus I seem to have enough stuff for 10 Chuckboxes.Troop Trailers are being frowned upon...and To Bulky...I thought why not have a Small Trailer which could be dropped in Camp..And No Unloading and reloading stuff..Seems I am behind the Times. I found a Forum that people talk about converting and Building trailers similar to the Aussie outback Trailers...Some cool Trailers there ..

 

http://tventuring.com/trailerforum

 

What do yall think about these type of trailers? for units who do more stationary type camping of course

 

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I like the idea of something more compact than a full-blown trailer. Keeps guys from overstocking.

 

My first thought was which campsites would support roads that would get the kitchen close enough. But, I guess if you have a bunch of boys they can wheel it in the remaining 100 yards.

 

My second thought was clean-up. Nice thing about a walk-in trailer: a boy can tidy it up on a rainy day (of which we have many). No dining fly required.

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Kinda reminds me of Hans Brinker.....

 

Maybe one could build them as a troop and sell them as a fundraiser to other troops as Gateway Trailers....

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Personally, i think it better to treat every campout as a backcountry trip, even knowing that most are really tailgate camping...

..... but why not use small tents, personal stoves, mess kits, etc....?

Bring the cooler and maybe some chairs.... well sure. a bit more than you'd pack in, but still, no need for the huge and complex kitchens.... just my opinion....

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<<

Personally, i think it better to treat every campout as a backcountry trip, even knowing that most are really tailgate camping...

..... but why not use small tents, personal stoves, mess kits, etc....?>>

 

 

I agree.

 

This style of camping is something that boys can continue as they become adults.

 

Create a unique, "heavy" style of camping and they may never go camping again after they leave Scouting.

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I think that the boys can learn different styles of cooking while camping.  When we do a basecamp, we bring one gear box per patrol:

 http://www.lowes.com/pd_44066-61896-44066_0__?productId=3551290&Ntt=storage+box&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dstorage%2Bbox&facetInfo=) 

 

one Coleman two burner stove, two dutch ovens and a foldable table.  That is the same gear that I would bring if I was going basecamping with my family (except I have a sturdier gear box and Coleman Roadtrip stove / grill which takes up a little more space).  At basecamp, they learn to cook and cleanup as a patrol.  When we go backpacking, each scout is responsible for cooking their own food although we encourage them to buddy up for efficiency.

 

I agree that the fancy trailers are difficult to replicate once you leave scouting, but I think it is important for the boys to learn patrol style cooking skills.  That being said, if the boys could sell a little more popcorn, I'd love one of these:

 

http://prestigefoodtrucks.com/big-smoke-burger/

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I have camped now for 60 years.  I have done so using a single-person tent, I have done the under the stars camping, I have traveled in a Pace Arrow.  I have used modern nylon tents and canvas tents, I have cooked on stoves and on campfires.  When I'm with the boys on an outing, I use either canvas tent for longer stays or nylon tent for weekends.  When I travel exclusively with the Mrs. it is a Class-B camper.   She feels safer on long trips and in the more wilderness areas with a hard-sided set up.  The pop-up didn't offer much protection against the bears and buffalo wandering through the campsite at Yellowstone.

 

I seriously doubt the style of camping one learns as a scout makes one iota bit of difference.  It's the love of the outdoors that sets the pace.  The equipment is adaptable to the love of the adventure.

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Personally, i think it better to treat every campout as a backcountry trip, even knowing that most are really tailgate camping...

..... but why not use small tents, personal stoves, mess kits, etc....?

Bring the cooler and maybe some chairs.... well sure. a bit more than you'd pack in, but still, no need for the huge and complex kitchens.... just my opinion....

I agree. Even if a patrol decides to do patrol cooking in the backcountry. each scout packs one pot and one utensil for the group. A patrol of 6 will then have at camp:

1 coffee pot

1 large pot

1 medium pot

1 large fry pan

1 medium fry pan

1 other...

 

1 spatula

1 tongs

1 spoon

1 ladle

1 knife

1 other...

 

A full kit all carried in their backpacks. Food gets packed inside the pots. Personally I think that is too much kit for a patrol. If one plans menus wisely, they can go with much less.

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I have a back country kitchen that works well for me.  I bought a plastic bin that fits exactly into an old BSA Yucca pack.  In it I have everything one could need for camping.  Bowls, spoons spatulas, wisks, spices, knives, etc. etc.  When I camp I carry it on the front to balance by back load.  If I'm canoeing, it balances my duffle with the aluminum DO in it. Love it for canoeing in that one doesn't have to carry it except on portages.

 

It is the second bag that gets tossed in on every weekend event.  I do have a second Yucca pack that has the luxury items in it, like coffee pot, backpack stove, and the much used aluminum dutch oven that has all these extra goodies packed inside.  :)   The three pack setup is used only for plop camping.

 

1 Pack - campfire cooking with mess kit

2 Packs - campfire cooking with plates, cups and silverware, expanded recipe options

3 Packs - backpack stove cooking with all the amenities of home.

 

Anything more than that, I just take the motorhome and Mrs.

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<<

 

Create a unique, "heavy" style of camping and they may never go camping again after they leave Scouting.

Boy So Glad all the people on that Forum and on the Facebook Groups were never Scouts....Otherwise none of them Would be in the Great outdoors...

The Tventuring forum has people from all over the World posting Great places to go Camping on Daily Basis. They share Great pictures.. I see more pictures of these type of Camping trips than the "Ruck it in" on your Back only by foot Trips...Where are the People posting the Hiked 2000 Miles over the Mountain Uphill both ways type of Trips? 

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Where are the People posting the Hiked 2000 Miles over the Mountain Uphill both ways type of Trips? 

 

Yeah, maybe if they left more of a trace. ;)

 

There is room for all kinds, ppl. If you want to throw a stone, make sure it's through the open door of your glass house.

 

My boys are the 'ruck it' types, but they also don't mind setting up a camp kitchen from time to time in an easy place for lots of folks to bring a nice camera. So, you'll see more pictures of them at family night with the DO's and large chow line and everyone lined up for flags or in front of the trailer, etc ... Makes momma happy.

 

What seems to make them happy is their "Hoover towns" improvised by a couple of tarps at streams edge with a fire-circle they built on-site ... and the occasional young ladies who are willing to hike a ways (and be escorted back to their site later in the evening) to enjoy their company!  They do more of those. But, when they are doing the 2000 yards uphill both ways (sometimes they insert at a creek mouth and extract at a plateau upstream), they are more likely to carry a nce stake than a fancy camera. (Those mult-magapixel phones have changed that a little.)

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Personally, i think it better to treat every campout as a backcountry trip, even knowing that most are really tailgate camping...

..... but why not use small tents, personal stoves, mess kits, etc....?

Bring the cooler and maybe some chairs.... well sure. a bit more than you'd pack in, but still, no need for the huge and complex kitchens.... just my opinion....

 

Well, there are some scouts for whom cooking on a camp-out isn't just an annoying chore.  While learning to do more with less is good, sometimes the ability to have a really good multi dish meal is fun.  While I'm certainly capable of dealing with a backcountry trip now and again, it's not my preference.  And I felt the same way as a scout.

 

Oddly enough, I was the cook most times then too.

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