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Basementdweller

Why Don't you pay for it?

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Once we said "A Scout pays his own way." We have weaseled that down to "A Scout works to pay his own way." Still, it does not say, "The Scoutmaster pays the Scout's way." Your parents are way out of line.

 

I had a TC once that just would not fund raise - $57.00 in 3.5 years.. I found new parents - in another troop.

 

Maybe a stranger from up the perceived pyramid can come to a special meeting and "give them the Word." (Not that it worked by my $57.00 TC, but it made me feel even better when I walked out the door. 75% of the Scouts [30] eventually showed up at the other troop.).

 

You are not being paid enough to be abused - even if they triple you salary.

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This is where Scout Accounts make a lot of sense. They can give boys an opportunity to earn their own way towards such activities.

 

Perhaps the Scoutmaster should have let it be known that he would need to consult with the Troop Committee before approving of such a party. That might even be a job for the Senior Patrol Leader in some troops.

 

 

 

SP-

 

Scout Accounts are NOT ALLOWED under IRS rules, so that is not an option even if it is a good one.

 

The PLC planned this evening, and in the great scheme of things, is not much money for the activities involved. If one or two families are having financial difficulties, that is a whole different conversation. But other than that, the parents need to figure out a better way to complain if they think that the Troop is spending excessively, and beating up the SM is not the right answer.

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Let's not go there. There are threads ad nauseam on scout accounts.

 

Base -- I'm as disgusted as you are. You should total all the things you've spent money on over the past few years, divided it by the number of Scouts and send each family an invoice.

 

Here it's not about money, but I'm having the similar frustrations. I'm thinking it's time for me to find a new pastime. Sounds like you may be there too. If you find yourself saying "I'm about done with this" more than a couple times, you probably are. Shoot, just based on length of time we've been members of these forums, we've more than done our share.

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... Scout Accounts are NOT ALLOWED under IRS rules' date=' so that is not an option even if it is a good one. ...[/quote']

 

The IRS is not gonna raise flags if $600 is socked away for a boy to spend on camp and a few bowling nights throughout the year. Heck, a boy's not required to file unless he "earns" more than $6099/year. (And the case law that caused the IRS to make the "individual benefit" ruling involved sports clubs with individual accounts that were bringing in twice that per member annually. Scale matters.) That said, ISA's are a pain. Avoid them.

 

But, I suspect it's a moot point in BD's case. The parents who were making a dig at the SM were not likely to support their boy fundraising for the troop. Otherwise, there would have been money in the treasury for everyone attending the party.

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. If you find yourself saying "I'm about done with this" more than a couple times' date=' you probably are. Shoot, just based on length of time we've been members of these forums, we've more than done our share. [/quote']

 

You may need a break. I know at one point, I took a "break" from a district position that was well needed to collect myself and focus on what was most important: my family. While I did go back to the district level, most of my time is unit wise now.

 

And let's face it Scouting is an addiction. There is something about watching a boy grow into a man that, despite all the challenges and aggrevations, makes you feel good about what you have done. Keeping up with your Scouts as adults, and even leaders themselves, makes it all worth.

 

I'll give you an example from last night. I have watched one Scout since he was a nervous, shy Tiger. He's very much the introvert, and he is self conscious because he does stutter. I have seen him grow, take responsibility, overcome some of his challenges. Last nite, in front over 100 people, he conducted a Cross Over Ceremony as SPL of his troop. That was an emotional high for me, and I could not have been any prouder.

 

All the BS I've put up with pales in comparision to what I saw last nite. And I am looking forward to many more memories like that one. Those memories make it worth it.

 

 

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Here's my two cents from 50,000 feet. The boys came up with an idea (hooray for them for just doing that) that may have come across as a surprise to a bunch of parents that don't have the money this time of year. Some parents came back with a knee jerk reaction that was way off base. The parents are clueless. No matter what, this is not a SM issue. There's a problem here between the parents and the PLC. If I were in this situation I'd talk to some of the parents and find out what's bugging them about the party. I'd tell them the party is optional and no, I will not pay for it. If the parents don't want to pay for it then I'd take that back to the PLC and tell them they have a problem to solve.

 

I would also ignore the obnoxious parents. This is about the boys. They don't seem to be upset with how the troop is running, and that's all that matters.

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You may need a break. I know at one point, I took a "break" from a district position that was well needed to collect myself and focus on what was most important: my family. While I did go back to the district level, most of my time is unit wise now.

 

And let's face it Scouting is an addiction. There is something about watching a boy grow into a man that, despite all the challenges and aggrevations, makes you feel good about what you have done. Keeping up with your Scouts as adults, and even leaders themselves, makes it all worth.

 

I'll give you an example from last night. I have watched one Scout since he was a nervous, shy Tiger. He's very much the introvert, and he is self conscious because he does stutter. I have seen him grow, take responsibility, overcome some of his challenges. Last nite, in front over 100 people, he conducted a Cross Over Ceremony as SPL of his troop. That was an emotional high for me, and I could not have been any prouder.

 

All the BS I've put up with pales in comparision to what I saw last nite. And I am looking forward to many more memories like that one. Those memories make it worth it.

 

 

Sounds like you got a good Scouter paycheck......

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Scout Accounts are NOT ALLOWED under IRS rules,

 

 

WHAT ? I have never heard this! We use it for Dues, Camp fees, books and uniforms. What do you mean it is not allowed

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Jason- here is a link to the last pertinent discussion on the topic:

 

http://www.scouter.com/forum/unit-fundraising/403237-individual-scout-accounts-part-trois

 

 

Lets keep this discussion on topic. We aren't discussing Scout accounts here.

 

As for the final statement on Scout accounts in this thread. I'll just insert this link from an official BSA publication, which Scouter.com is not. http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2014/12/03/individual-scout-accounts/

 

Now, back to a conversation about crazy parents, and not ISA's.

 

Sentinel947

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A couple of years ago a Girl Guides leader sent me the post below, a spoof job advert for a Guide leader. It's very tongue in cheek but makes the point. It might be time for this to find its way to the parents who are making such ridiculous demands of you;

 

JOB DESCRIPTION: Long-term team players needed for challenging

permanent work in an often chaotic environment. Candidates must possess excellent

communication and organisational skills and be willing to work variable

hours, which will include evenings and weekends and sometimes 24 hour

shifts on call. Some overnight travel required, including trips to

primitive camping sites on rainy and/or snowy weekends. Travel expenses

not reimbursed. Extensive courier duties also required.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES: Must be willing to be hated at least temporarily,

until the next fun activity. Must be willing to bite tongue repeatedly. Also,

must possess the physical stamina of a pack mule and be able to go from

zero to 60 mph in three seconds flat in case, this time, the screams

from the other end of the room are not someone just crying wolf. Must be

willing to face stimulating technical challenges, such as small gadget repair,

mysteriously sluggish toilets and stuck zippers. Must screen phone

calls, maintain calendars and co-ordinate production of multiple projects.

Must have ability to plan and organize social gatherings for clients of all

ages and mental outlooks. Must be willing to be indispensable until the time

comes to move on. Must handle assembly and product safety testing of a

half million "things" made from fun foam, wood, string, wiggly eyes,

feathers, glue and such like. Must always hope for the best but be prepared for

the worst. Must assume final, complete accountability for the quality of

the end product. Responsibilities also include floor maintenance and

janitorial work throughout the facility.

 

HOURS OF WORK: Variable - ranges from 1.5 hours per week to every

available waking moment.

 

POSSIBILITY FOR ADVANCEMENT AND PROMOTION: Virtually none. Your job is

to remain in the same position for years, dealing with individuals of different ages at different times, without complaining, constantly retraining and updating your skills, so that those in your charge can ultimately surpass you.

 

PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE: None required. On-the-job training offered on a continually exciting basis. Training sessions also available, to be taken with a wide variety of people in exactly the same position you are.

 

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS - must have a dining room table to give to

Guiding, as well as bookcases, space for boxes, craft supplies, camp supplies, and

other paraphernalia.

 

WAGES AND COMPENSATION: Money-wise - none. This is offset by smiles,

hugs and tears, either your own or those of the people in your charge.

 

BENEFITS: While no health or dental insurance, no pension, no tuition

reimbursement, no paid holidays and no stock options are offered; this

job supplies limitless opportunities for personal growth and free hugs for

life if you play your cards right.

 

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