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Brewmeister

Alcohol consumption outside the US?

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This is and interesting topic and a lot of fun. But for me brings up a question. I was recently at a conceal event and as I was walking around the tents groups I noticed that some of the parents had beer in there camping cups I did not say anything because the only reason I could tell they were drinking was the beer in there cups they were keeping there composure and were not stumbling or whooping it up.

 

Now I am a recovering alcoholic so my judgment might be a bit off did I do the right thing by not saying anything ?

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This is and interesting topic and a lot of fun. But for me brings up a question. I was recently at a conceal event and as I was walking around the tents groups I noticed that some of the parents had beer in there camping cups I did not say anything because the only reason I could tell they were drinking was the beer in there cups they were keeping there composure and were not stumbling or whooping it up.

 

Now I am a recovering alcoholic so my judgment might be a bit off did I do the right thing by not saying anything ?

 

It's a tough call. If it was your own unit, I'd absolutely say something. If it's somebody else's unit, I'm really hesitant to be the BSA regulation police on somebody else's unit. Personally if I was in your situation, I would have left it alone. Not my unit and I could call somebody at the Council, but I couldn't prove it if I wanted to. Maybe I'd say something to their Scoutmaster if I knew him.

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A one write rule that covers all aspects of an issue will most certainly devolve to the most restrictive. I have had candle lanterns in tents, open candles, cooked under dying flies, etc. I have done the wood stoves inside tents and NONE of those tents/tarps were nylon. That also means none of the items inside the tent were nylon as well. Of course meadow crashing next to the campfire on a cold night might be pushing the rules a bit. :) It used to be a fire-guard was a person, not a set of tools and buckets. But then I'm a lot older than a lot of those on the forum. I do remember the pre-nylon days. :) Anyone remember what a "bug light" was? Baker tents were great in colder weather (think reflector oven).

 

Stosh

 

My camping experiences growing up with the family were almost all sleeping in canvas tents. The exception was when we went back packing or snow camping. To this day, the smell of canvas in the sun means camping to me. Yes nylon tents are much lighter than canvas, but the canvas breaths in a way that nylon doesn't. We had lanterns and propane heaters in those tents. My boy scout troop growing up used nylon tents (so we could back pack with them), canvas was for summer camp. I did see a troop using Baker tents at a camporee once. They said that they took them back packing, but they also took a couple of mules back packing to carry them.

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My buddy and I carried 1/2 of a pup tent each like the military and did just fine. Now if I want to backpack, I have a one-man tent. or just use my poncho. I've even set up my 1/2 pup tent as a shebang and it worked nicely. if it rained, throw the poncho over the opening. I guess I don't need as much comfort as boys expect today.

 

Stosh

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Brew,

 

Greetings!

 

There are a few BSA (and GUSUSA) programs abroad, through Direct Service and overseas BSA councils. The G2SS rules are the same, there is no more boldface in the G2SS and they are guidelines, but should be read and complied with wisely.

 

In many other national Scouting organizations, often parents are titled Commissioners and the Scoutmasters are what the BSA would consider BSA College Reserve or Eagle Alumni. When camping with other Scouting organizations, it is sometimes wise to discuss the American traditions so that other leaders become aware of our separate sleeping and sanitary concerns, or restrictions on alcohol during events, and our program safety concerns. Many other nations Scouting organizations would assume we administer the program the similarly. Such as, rappel without belay, dive without a buddy, sleep/shower in the same facility and enjoy a beverage around the campfire. After learning a few of our similarities and differences, most other Scouters are happy to abide by our G2SS for a brief weekend.

 

Scouting Forever and Venture On!

Crew21 Adv

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Brew,

 

Greetings!

 

There are a few BSA (and GUSUSA) programs abroad, through Direct Service and overseas BSA councils. The G2SS rules are the same, there is no more boldface in the G2SS and they are guidelines, but should be read and complied with wisely.

 

In many other national Scouting organizations, often parents are titled Commissioners and the Scoutmasters are what the BSA would consider BSA College Reserve or Eagle Alumni. When camping with other Scouting organizations, it is sometimes wise to discuss the American traditions so that other leaders become aware of our separate sleeping and sanitary concerns, or restrictions on alcohol during events, and our program safety concerns. Many other nations Scouting organizations would assume we administer the program the similarly. Such as, rappel without belay, dive without a buddy, sleep/shower in the same facility and enjoy a beverage around the campfire. After learning a few of our similarities and differences, most other Scouters are happy to abide by our G2SS for a brief weekend.

 

Scouting Forever and Venture On!

Crew21 Adv

- emphases mine

 

So if I am reading you right, you are saying if we are guests of a foreign scouting group, we should impose our rules on them? How is that Courteous? If they were visiting us, would it be reasonable for them to impose their rules on us?

 

I agree that being aware of differences is important and discussing them with a host beforehand is good way to avoid surprises. But the solution isn't to ask them to do things differently, but to be aware that we will be doing things differently and to figure out how we can integrate ourselves with their way of doing things. After all, one of the whole points of visiting a foreign unit is to expose everyone to ways that foreign scouts are different and alike. Just be aware of their rules and have a plan before you get there.

 

If their leaders have a tradition of a late night toast around the campfire with an alcoholic beverage, don't ask them not to do it, instead tell them our leaders will be joining them but will be toasting with juice or water instead. If they have fires in their tents, don't ask them not to do it, either have your scouts in their own fireless tents or let them experience it for one night with the foreign scouts (after all, aren't experiences like this are part of the point?).

 

If you are staying at a foreign scout camp (such as Kandersteg International Scout Centre) the camp will be run using the rules of the sponsoring organization, you need to know what those are and how to adapt.

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I think on things like fires in tents or alcohol, we use our rules and they use theirs. Pretty simple eh? Rick hits it on the head.

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