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OA and the aboriginal cultures

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15 minutes ago, David CO said:

I am finding it very difficult to carry on a conversation with you. You keep switching from general to specific and specific to general, depending on the point you want to make. In general, I think OA is disrespectful. There may be specific instances where they are not.

Okay, I'll be specific in this post.

How is the OA disrespectful when some Native American nations approve of certain OA lodges using their traditions, garb, and ceremonies? 

 

Edited by desertrat77
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I'll ask the same question that was asked during the gay scout debate, if everyone is living the Scout Law and Oath to the fullest, how can they be disrespectful?

Barry

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26 minutes ago, desertrat77 said:

Okay, I'll be specific in this post.

How is the OA disrespectful when some Native American nations approve of certain OA lodges using their traditions, garb, and ceremonies? 

 

I will take you on your word that this actually happens. It is outside of my experience. I agree that it is possible for an OA group to be respectful.

 

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As a descendent of "North Men", I would have no problem renaming it to Order of the Axe, wearing furs and helmets (no horns though) and drinking Scout-approved mead.

I promise you I won't get offended...even if some guy shows up in horns.

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18 hours ago, Col. Flagg said:

As a descendent of "North Men", I would have no problem renaming it to Order of the Axe, wearing furs and helmets (no horns though) and drinking Scout-approved mead.

I promise you I won't get offended...even if some guy shows up in horns.

Does this mean I need to memorize Beowulf? 

Or learn old English? 

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How about appropriate Knights of the Round Table? Scouting started in England, kind of makes sense. Chivalric code and all.

From BP's Scouting for Boys

“In the old days the Knights were the real Scouts and their rules were very much like the Scout Law which we have now. The Knights considered their honor their most sacred possession. They would not do a dishonorable thing, such as telling a lie or stealing. They would rather die than do it. They were always ready to fight and to be killed in upholding their king, or their religion, or their honor. Each Knight had a small following of a squire and some men-at-arms, just as our Patrol Leader has his Second (or Assistant) and four or five Scouts. …  You Scouts cannot do better than follow the example of the Knights.”

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39 minutes ago, Tampa Turtle said:

Not very american that.

Nope, but apparently we are offending all of the Americans.

And since we already "appropriated" Scouting from the Brits I can't imagine they would be offended if we did so with the Knights of the Round Table.

But hey......... who knows.

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1 hour ago, Oldscout448 said:

Does this mean I need to memorize Beowulf? 

Or learn old English? 

Nope. We take from the Saga of Ragnar. You can't offend the North Men.

Can't do anything British because we will offend someone eventually.

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16 minutes ago, HelpfulTracks said:

Nope, but apparently we are offending all of the Americans.

And since we already "appropriated" Scouting from the Brits I can't imagine they would be offended if we did so with the Knights of the Round Table.

But hey......... who knows.

Can we appropriate a myth? Won't someone get mythically offended? ;)

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2 hours ago, Col. Flagg said:

Can we appropriate a myth? Won't someone get mythically offended? ;)

Well, based on the current train of thought that the aggrieved party in appropriation are those who were subjected to colonization/subjugation, I think we are in the clear.

All of this is their fault, right?

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1 hour ago, HelpfulTracks said:

Well, based on the current train of thought that the aggrieved party in appropriation are those who were subjected to colonization/subjugation, I think we are in the clear.

All of this is their fault, right?

In today's environment, I would never assume that. Someone, somewhere will get offended and make a stink and BSA will back down. That seems to be the process.

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Just now, Col. Flagg said:

In today's environment, I would never assume that. Someone, somewhere will get offended and make a stink and BSA will back down. That seems to be the process.

Oh, I agree, which is why I didn't say they wouldn't be offended. But using the cultural appropriation guidebook them being offended is of no consequence.

Just in case anyone isn't paying attention to the whole thread. This is all sarcasm.

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