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skeptic

​I say ......... Merry Christmas; by Joseph S. Bonsall (from 2003)

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This Merry Christmas/Happy Holiday junk gets trotted out every year. Who cares? Last time I checked, Christmas is one of the holidays celebrated this time of the year. If someone wants to wish me a merry Christmas, fine. If they want to wish me a Swell Sewy Yelda (thanks for the list, NAE), that's okay too. If the want to lump all the holidays together, I don't mind that either.

 

Some folks sure go out of their way to find thing to be offended over.

Twocub, I quite agree.

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I don't have to be Jewish to wish someone a Happy Hanukkah if that's what it takes to make them feel good. That's the purpose of the expression. There have been those that have smiled when I said Merry Christmas and then told me they were not Christian. I followed up with what they tell me Jewish or something else. If I recognize the religion I adapt the greeting and if they say they aren't religious, I still wish them a Happy Holiday and hope that Santa can still come to their house. No one says that Santa isn't welcomed. :)

 

So for all the friends on the forum: "Happy whatever it takes to put a smile on your face and a feeling of peace in your heart."

 

I'll accept any response from you including "Go to hell." if that what it takes to put a smile on your face and a feeling of peace in your heart. :)

 

Stosh

How about instead of wishing you ill will, I suggest, "Let's go on a hike?" That puts a smile on my face. At last, great hiking weather and with the leaves down, I can see the vistas all the better. Nice.

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I've lived in foreign countries where celebrating Christmas is not the norm, and been offered good wishes based on the predominant religious holiday there. My first thought is not to take offense, but to appreciate the good nature of the greeting, wish them a greeting for their holiday in return - "And a Happy Ramadan to you, also!" . (Why not? I don't celebrate it but that doesn't mean I don't want them to enjoy it.) I don't inform them loftily that I don't celebrate their holiday, or feel the need to inform them what holiday I DO celebrate. I'm aware that the holiday they proclaim exists, and the well-wisher celebrates it.

 

I usually wish someone a "Merry Christmas" unless I know they celebrate Hanukkah (which is long past this year, NeverAnEagle - it happened in November, on Thanksgiving, not in December), in which case I wish them a Happy Hanukkah (Why not? Scripture tells us Jesus celebrated it, too.) If someone wishes to take the time to inform me that they are not religious, don't celebrate Christmas, celebrate the Feast of Sol invictus or Kwanza'a or The High Celebration of the Great Speckled Bird, or something, I just smile and wish them a Happy (fill in the blank), or at the very least, a happy December 25.

 

A holiday greeting should be about spreading good will, not acting like a jackass.

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Ya knowâ€â€If a good many christians in this nation would stop and think they'd realize that most people don't have a problem with “Merry Christmas†per say. The problem arises when I'm expected to wish Christians a Merry Christmas, even though I don't celebrate Christmas and worse, that I cannot wish Christans a “Blessed Solstice†of “Joyous Yule,†which happen to be MY holidays because it offends them!

No one is trying to “tear down your traditions.†Rather, they have simply recognized that others have traditions that are different than your own. I do not go Christmas Shopping; Christians do not go Festivus Shopping, however, BOTH groups do engage in HOLIDAY SHOPPING, thus advertising “Holiday Sales†is entirely approperate since the retailer wishes to have everyone inside shopping.

“But, what about my customs?†You ask. Well, What about my customs? What if I insisted that you work Christmas every year, but you got Yule off instead? You'd likely be just as unhappy as I am currently.

People don't want mangers in public squares, because a good many other religions, who also have holidays in December, are not permited to erect their own religious displays. Policies should be simple; either every religon with a holiday gets to put up a display, or the display can have no religious elements. That's what happens when you are being treated EQUALLY, not persecuted, just treated EQUAL to other citizens.

Because we live in a nation rich in cultural and ethnic diversity it is important to remember that not everyone is celebrating Christmas this holiday season. Currently, I am aware of 21 other holidays that occur this month:

 

  1. Bodhi Day
  2. Boxing Day
  3. Chalica
  4. Donghi Festival
  5. Dzon'ku 'Nu
  6. Feast of Winter Veil
  7. Festivus
  8. Hanukkah
  9. Human Light
  10. Inti Raymi
  11. Junkanoo
  12. Kwanzaa
  13. New Years Eve
  14. Newtonmas
  15. Pancha Ganapati
  16. Saturnalia
  17. Sewy Yelda
  18. Winter Solstice
  19. Watch Night
  20. Yule
  21. Zarathosht Diso

I’m sure there are more December holidays that I’m not aware of. Regardless of how many or how few there are, it is important to wish those around us “Happy Holidays†because you may not know just which holiday they will be celebrating this December.

Which of these isn't real?

 

1. Bodhi Dayâ€â€December 8th, the day of Buddha’s Enlightenment; 550 BCE

2. Boxing Dayâ€â€December 26th, A day to give to the poor; Bohemian, 10th Century.

3. Chalicaâ€â€Week long holiday starting the 1st Monday in December centering on Unitarian vales. 2005.

4. Donghi Festivalâ€â€Chinese Winter Solstice; celebration is as old as the sun

5. Dzon'ku 'Nuâ€â€December 22nd; West African Solstice Celebration

6. Feast of Winter Veilâ€â€December 26th thru January 2nd; World of War Craft (gamers have holidays too!)

7. Festivusâ€â€December 23rd; Festivus was conceived by O'Keefe and was first celebrated in 1966.

8. Hanukkahâ€â€Date varies from year to year; Jewish, 2nd Century BC

9. Human Lightâ€â€December 23rdâ€â€Humanist; 2001

10. Inti Raymiâ€â€Festival of the Sun; Incan Impire; Celebration shared with Sothern Hemisphere Catholics since 1535.

11. Junkanooâ€â€December 26th; Bahamas 1600’s

12. Kwanzaaâ€â€December 26th to January 1st; Western African Diaspora 1966.

13. New Years’ Eveâ€â€December 31st; Roman, 45 BC

14. Newtonmasâ€â€December 25th; Atheist Celebration, 1890.

15. Pancha Ganapatiâ€â€December 21st to December 25th; Hindu 1985

16. Saturnaliaâ€â€December 17th to December 23rd; Roman/Greek, 217 BC

17. Sewy Yeldaâ€â€December 20th; Persian, As old as the Sun

18. Winter Solsticeâ€â€As old as the Sun

19. Watch Nightâ€â€December 31st; International; 325 CE.

20. Yuleâ€â€December 21st; Norse/Germanic/Celtic, approx. 1300 BCE

21. Zarathosht Disoâ€â€Date varies; Persian, 539 BCE

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Ya knowâ€â€If a good many christians in this nation would stop and think they'd realize that most people don't have a problem with “Merry Christmas†per say. The problem arises when I'm expected to wish Christians a Merry Christmas, even though I don't celebrate Christmas and worse, that I cannot wish Christans a “Blessed Solstice†of “Joyous Yule,†which happen to be MY holidays because it offends them!

No one is trying to “tear down your traditions.†Rather, they have simply recognized that others have traditions that are different than your own. I do not go Christmas Shopping; Christians do not go Festivus Shopping, however, BOTH groups do engage in HOLIDAY SHOPPING, thus advertising “Holiday Sales†is entirely approperate since the retailer wishes to have everyone inside shopping.

“But, what about my customs?†You ask. Well, What about my customs? What if I insisted that you work Christmas every year, but you got Yule off instead? You'd likely be just as unhappy as I am currently.

People don't want mangers in public squares, because a good many other religions, who also have holidays in December, are not permited to erect their own religious displays. Policies should be simple; either every religon with a holiday gets to put up a display, or the display can have no religious elements. That's what happens when you are being treated EQUALLY, not persecuted, just treated EQUAL to other citizens.

Because we live in a nation rich in cultural and ethnic diversity it is important to remember that not everyone is celebrating Christmas this holiday season. Currently, I am aware of 21 other holidays that occur this month:

 

  1. Bodhi Day
  2. Boxing Day
  3. Chalica
  4. Donghi Festival
  5. Dzon'ku 'Nu
  6. Feast of Winter Veil
  7. Festivus
  8. Hanukkah
  9. Human Light
  10. Inti Raymi
  11. Junkanoo
  12. Kwanzaa
  13. New Years Eve
  14. Newtonmas
  15. Pancha Ganapati
  16. Saturnalia
  17. Sewy Yelda
  18. Winter Solstice
  19. Watch Night
  20. Yule
  21. Zarathosht Diso

I’m sure there are more December holidays that I’m not aware of. Regardless of how many or how few there are, it is important to wish those around us “Happy Holidays†because you may not know just which holiday they will be celebrating this December.

They are all real, what a person believes is up to that person, and a part of "reverence" is respecting the beliefs of others ... especially when they differ from your own.

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I don't have to be Jewish to wish someone a Happy Hanukkah if that's what it takes to make them feel good. That's the purpose of the expression. There have been those that have smiled when I said Merry Christmas and then told me they were not Christian. I followed up with what they tell me Jewish or something else. If I recognize the religion I adapt the greeting and if they say they aren't religious, I still wish them a Happy Holiday and hope that Santa can still come to their house. No one says that Santa isn't welcomed. :)

 

So for all the friends on the forum: "Happy whatever it takes to put a smile on your face and a feeling of peace in your heart."

 

I'll accept any response from you including "Go to hell." if that what it takes to put a smile on your face and a feeling of peace in your heart. :)

 

Stosh

I'm in Pack!

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i have a jewish friend. we have known each other for last 20 or so yrs. he is a life scout. never made it to eagle. his father was a SM. last yr during our pack bonfire, i asked him if it really bothers him when someone says "merry christmas" to him. i occasionally invite him to our pack/troop events. he has only 1 daughter, no sons. he thought about it for awhile and said it does bother him to a certain degree. not offended or anything, but it bother him nevertheless. so i called him up and said "merry christmas" to him this yr. after calling him for "happy hanuka". he called me some names and we had a good laugh.

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As I have said in this forum on those few occasions when it was relevant, I am Jewish. When I think back to when I was a younger person, it probably DID bother me a little when someone wished me a Merry Christmas. It no longer does. If a person does not know I am Jewish, Merry Christmas is fine, Happy Holidays is fine, and I once got a Happy Winter Solstice card from a friend, that's fine too. All of them are good wishes, and who I am to reject a good wish? As for what I say back... unlike one poster above, I do not believe it is against my religion or beliefs to say Merry Christmas back. I am not "celebrating" Christmas (although I do that too, in a sense - stay tuned) when I say Merry Christmas to someone who has said it to me, nor I am I participating in any sort of religious ritual that is contrary to my beliefs. I am just wishing THAT PERSON a Merry Christmas for him/herself. They have indicated to me that THEY celebrate Christmas, and I am just wishing them a good one. (That all assumes that Merry Christmas is being used as a greeting; unfortunately the original post is evidence that more and more, Merry Christmas is being used as a challenge rather than a greeting, which I think is regrettable.)

 

Now, as I suggested above, perhaps my acceptance of Merry Christmas, although it relates to a religion that is not mine, is due in part to the fact that (as I have also said before) I have been married to a Catholic woman for more than 30 years, and have "celebrated" Christmas with her and her family since shortly after we met. (And my children were "raised Catholic," although one is now in a different Christian denomination and the other two appear to be not much of anything, religion-wise.) For me it is not a religious holiday, it is more of a "family holiday." When Christian prayers are said at the dinner table, I remain respectfully silent, as I do when I find myself in a Christian church for Scout Sunday, or a wedding, or for any other reason. I find Christmas (at its core, leaving aside the shopping frenzy) to be a nice holiday, full of wishes of peace and joy. As I said before though, it is regrettable that in the past few years, some people (like the Oak Ridge Boy quoted above, apparently) have tried to turn Christmas into a political issue.

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I've lived in foreign countries where celebrating Christmas is not the norm, and been offered good wishes based on the predominant religious holiday there. My first thought is not to take offense, but to appreciate the good nature of the greeting, wish them a greeting for their holiday in return - "And a Happy Ramadan to you, also!" . (Why not? I don't celebrate it but that doesn't mean I don't want them to enjoy it.) I don't inform them loftily that I don't celebrate their holiday, or feel the need to inform them what holiday I DO celebrate. I'm aware that the holiday they proclaim exists, and the well-wisher celebrates it.

 

I usually wish someone a "Merry Christmas" unless I know they celebrate Hanukkah (which is long past this year, NeverAnEagle - it happened in November, on Thanksgiving, not in December), in which case I wish them a Happy Hanukkah (Why not? Scripture tells us Jesus celebrated it, too.) If someone wishes to take the time to inform me that they are not religious, don't celebrate Christmas, celebrate the Feast of Sol invictus or Kwanza'a or The High Celebration of the Great Speckled Bird, or something, I just smile and wish them a Happy (fill in the blank), or at the very least, a happy December 25.

 

A holiday greeting should be about spreading good will, not acting like a jackass.

I like the idea of spreading lots of good food - pick any good holiday to celebrate, your choice. The good will comes easily on a full stomach.

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As I have said in this forum on those few occasions when it was relevant, I am Jewish. When I think back to when I was a younger person, it probably DID bother me a little when someone wished me a Merry Christmas. It no longer does. If a person does not know I am Jewish, Merry Christmas is fine, Happy Holidays is fine, and I once got a Happy Winter Solstice card from a friend, that's fine too. All of them are good wishes, and who I am to reject a good wish? As for what I say back... unlike one poster above, I do not believe it is against my religion or beliefs to say Merry Christmas back. I am not "celebrating" Christmas (although I do that too, in a sense - stay tuned) when I say Merry Christmas to someone who has said it to me, nor I am I participating in any sort of religious ritual that is contrary to my beliefs. I am just wishing THAT PERSON a Merry Christmas for him/herself. They have indicated to me that THEY celebrate Christmas, and I am just wishing them a good one. (That all assumes that Merry Christmas is being used as a greeting; unfortunately the original post is evidence that more and more, Merry Christmas is being used as a challenge rather than a greeting, which I think is regrettable.)

 

Now, as I suggested above, perhaps my acceptance of Merry Christmas, although it relates to a religion that is not mine, is due in part to the fact that (as I have also said before) I have been married to a Catholic woman for more than 30 years, and have "celebrated" Christmas with her and her family since shortly after we met. (And my children were "raised Catholic," although one is now in a different Christian denomination and the other two appear to be not much of anything, religion-wise.) For me it is not a religious holiday, it is more of a "family holiday." When Christian prayers are said at the dinner table, I remain respectfully silent, as I do when I find myself in a Christian church for Scout Sunday, or a wedding, or for any other reason. I find Christmas (at its core, leaving aside the shopping frenzy) to be a nice holiday, full of wishes of peace and joy. As I said before though, it is regrettable that in the past few years, some people (like the Oak Ridge Boy quoted above, apparently) have tried to turn Christmas into a political issue.

I probably need to clarify my previous comment, I'll gladly celebrate any holiday that has good food attached. I agree regarding 'politics'. Why would anyone want to spoil a good meal?

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To me, I'd be much more grateful if someone said L'Shana Tova to me during the High Holidays than Happy Hanukkah now (especially considering Hanukkah is long over). Saying Happy Hanukkah now is just saying the Jewish version of Merry Christmas. Happy Holidays is just the same. What holiday? Bottom line is I'm just as content hearing Merry Christmas as anything else and just taking it for what it is: good will. Life is too short to get in a knot over this.

 

In a way, I do feel sorry for Christians in that Christmas seems to be much more cultural and commercial than religious. One of the nice things about being a minority is that your holidays aren't hijacked by commercialism.

 

So, for those of you for which Christmas is an important day to reflect about what Christ means to you, Merry Christmas.

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Greetings of the season, all! In the spirit of Pack's notion, what are y'all having for your feasts? We had roast venison last night and a ham tonight. Mmmmm! Tamales for new years eve.

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A variety of meats, but best of all: the universal garnish of my wife's aunt's homemade horseradish, of which a jar got sent home.

 

May God rest ye mightily, gentlemen (and ladies). I do believe in most cases, that's a good thing. But if you believe there's something better you should wishing me when we meet, I do hope you'll find it in your heart to offer it. The Good Book tells me that the Almighty's translation service doesn't process words as well as it does the pits of souls.

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Christmas Eve traditional Italian feast with at least 15 types of seafood plus pasta, some ethnic things that taste good but I can't spell, not to mention about a dozen different kinds of Christmas pies, cookies, and cakes. "I can't believe I ate the whole thing"

Since then, leftovers. I polished off the strawberry cheesecake for lunch today and followed that with sweet potato bread and some bacon left over from breakfast. Mmmmmmm good!

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