Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tampa Turtle

Wilderness Survival MB help --Natural Shelter vs Leave No Trace

Recommended Posts

My favorite memory of wilderness survival was dinner. We built our shelters (not a problem in scrub oak Oklahoma - TONS of stuff on the ground). Cleared fire rings and got fire started. Then we heard an engine.

 

Up drove a pickup, from the back the unmistakable sounds of chickens. Live chickens.

 

Each team of 3 Scouts was handed a live bird, with the direction to kill, clean, and cook a bird for dinner. Final sign-off came after you ate dinner.

Hmmm, I wonder if GTSS would allow killing the chicken.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Duct Tape but we will be lucky if it drops below 70 degrees at night! :) We are doing in order:

-Fire Making Practice

-Water Purification Practice

-First Aid

-Food and Signalling

-Shelter Review

 

We then disperse and work on Shelters at a remote site.

 

Fire is very popular--1/3 of the boys are really, really good at it, Only a couple have mastered the fire-bow though. Almost all can do flint and steel and found tinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'll bet some good memories could be had, by dropping in the wilderness someplace with minimal supplies, and no "brought in" bamboo poles etc..... with minimal stuff to simulate a real scenario such as "lost on a day hike"

Like Less Stroud used to do on his show survivorman.

Give the boys some good lessons, and some good times.

As long as the weather is mild, they would be ok even if their shelter was sort of a flop. they'd still be able to lash together something and would be ok for a night.....

drop in with a knife, a flint steel, maybe a can of sardines per scout, canteens..... and the laces from their boots

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that approach but the MBC has gone in another direction. A fellow Troop does a "opps we got lost" exercise with no notice--you DID bring your 10 essentials with you at all times didn't you?".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you talk to survivalists, the first thing they always tell you is, conserve your energy for the important things. You need water and shelter first. Then within the next 30 days, you can think about food if you have enough energy left over.

 

Big John got lost in the woods and survived for 2 weeks on bugs and berries. No, he survived 2 weeks on body fat. Anyone that can down 28,000 calories of bugs and berries ought to get some kind of award. :)

 

 

Stosh

Stosh,

 

That's what my oldest learned in Wilderness Survival merit Badge. Worry about water and shelter, everything else can wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like that approach but the MBC has gone in another direction. A fellow Troop does a "opps we got lost" exercise with no notice--you DID bring your 10 essentials with you at all times didn't you?".
I like that idea. I may do that on a day hike in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like that approach but the MBC has gone in another direction. A fellow Troop does a "opps we got lost" exercise with no notice--you DID bring your 10 essentials with you at all times didn't you?".
I pull that stunt all the time, especially with first aid. I pick a kid and tell him to sit down, he just "sprained his ankle". I used to pick the last guy in line of march, but my boys have caught on and have the Assistant HikeMaster always bringing up the rear and they no longer have to go back and find the injured boy after walking a half hour before noticing he's not with them anymore. :) My HikeMaster would carry a 6' closet rod walking stick as would the Assistant HikeMaster. A limber is a lot easier than taking turns carrying the boy on their backs back to camp. :)

 

Flint and steel, and bow-drill are nice, but as Tampa pointed out, he should have waterproof matches in his essentials. I always carry a magnifying glass in my gear. It can get soaking wet and still work on a sunny day. Magnesium is my secondary backup, works quite well even on damp tinder and dry pith. Also, the pine 6' walking stick makes a ton of whittled tinder, too. Worse case scenario, they have to buy a new rod for $6. :)

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like that approach but the MBC has gone in another direction. A fellow Troop does a "opps we got lost" exercise with no notice--you DID bring your 10 essentials with you at all times didn't you?".
... sunny day ... now that's funny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like that approach but the MBC has gone in another direction. A fellow Troop does a "opps we got lost" exercise with no notice--you DID bring your 10 essentials with you at all times didn't you?".
Hey, ya gotta Be Prepared just in case it ever happens!

 

:) Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GSS 2013"

 

"Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy

Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of

the program curriculum.

(The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered

packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips.

However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews

from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting

expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures

are followed and that all participants have obtained

necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or

federal agencies. While hunter safety education might

not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license,

successful completion of the respective state voluntary

program is required before participating in the activity.)"

 

I would assume that hunting would include chasing a chicken to wring it's neck, setting a snare, etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GSS 2013"

 

"Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy

Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of

the program curriculum.

(The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered

packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips.

However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews

from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting

expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures

are followed and that all participants have obtained

necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or

federal agencies. While hunter safety education might

not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license,

successful completion of the respective state voluntary

program is required before participating in the activity.)"

 

I would assume that hunting would include chasing a chicken to wring it's neck, setting a snare, etc?

:) I'm going to go out on a limb here, but I think they were referring to hunting with weapons. When I was a kid, butchering chickens didn't fall into the category of hunting. Chasing, maybe, but not hunting. Two nails in a stump and a belt ax and then having them run around for a while is a lot more fun than wringing their necks. There's a real good reason for the adage: "Running around like a chicken with it's head cut off." You're going to have to have a PTSD program for your boys if you do it, however.

 

Setting a snare fits into the category of trapping and you need a different license for that.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GSS 2013"

 

"Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy

Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of

the program curriculum.

(The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered

packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips.

However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews

from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting

expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures

are followed and that all participants have obtained

necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or

federal agencies. While hunter safety education might

not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license,

successful completion of the respective state voluntary

program is required before participating in the activity.)"

 

I would assume that hunting would include chasing a chicken to wring it's neck, setting a snare, etc?

Hmmm....if done right maybe it could be considered "gathering". :)

 

Alternately maybe a chicken drop, Les Nessman style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GSS 2013"

 

"Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy

Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of

the program curriculum.

(The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered

packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips.

However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews

from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting

expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures

are followed and that all participants have obtained

necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or

federal agencies. While hunter safety education might

not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license,

successful completion of the respective state voluntary

program is required before participating in the activity.)"

 

I would assume that hunting would include chasing a chicken to wring it's neck, setting a snare, etc?

There was a gal in 4-H that raised a turkey for her project and when it was done she had a 43# turkey. It was so big, even dressed out, it wouldn't fit in any oven. So she donated it to a boy scout troop. To get it to camp, the boys needed a cooler with wheels! They did a tripod/aluminum foil oven and cooked it for the whole camp. It was excellent!

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GSS 2013"

 

"Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy

Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of

the program curriculum.

(The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered

packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips.

However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews

from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting

expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures

are followed and that all participants have obtained

necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or

federal agencies. While hunter safety education might

not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license,

successful completion of the respective state voluntary

program is required before participating in the activity.)"

 

I would assume that hunting would include chasing a chicken to wring it's neck, setting a snare, etc?

Setting a snare is trapping, not hunting. Trapping was vital to some of my buddies college funds. Which reminds me of a t-shit my father-in-law and I wanted to produce to make sure boys could still maintain a profitable hobby: "Spare Roadkill. Wear Fur."

 

But in general, we just have them set up traps and test tripping them with a thin stick. Here again, the ranger might have an opinion. He might not want any trap set for any longer than it takes to demonstrate and test. Or, on the other hand, there might be an infestation that the boys could try to help clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We figured we could test trap as well. Fun and a good time filler. I think we will bring some game that has gently passed away in their sleep. Dressing and cooking a bunny is a big leap for these city boys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×