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christineka

Craftsman- at home project, come up with new one?

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Last time we worked on craftsman, I sent the boys home with the fourth, non-wood project, told them to complete it, and return. It was just a lanyard. 2 of the 4 boys brought their completed lanyards back. The other 2 have sisters, who are very expert at lanyard making and can help. It's been weeks. Should I come up with another craftsman project for them to do or tell them to do the lanyard or they won't earn craftsman? We have just one more wood project left. That will be the subject of our next den meeting. (Today we must finish Citizenship and go over the webelos requirements.)

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If the boys decided they hate lanyards and ask you to come up with another project, maybe you should. But, if they are just shrugging their shoulders, it's on their parents to think of another project that they should do. They might want their boys to make a holiday decoration or gift for a teacher (or maybe for those talented sisters ;) ).

 

This falls under the "listen to the youth" aspect of scouting. You're not really dictating assignments. You're making suggestions based on where you think they would like to expand their talents. At the end of the day, if the youth would rather not do anything: no problem, no achievement, no recognition.

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If the boys decided they hate lanyards and ask you to come up with another project, maybe you should. But, if they are just shrugging their shoulders, it's on their parents to think of another project that they should do. They might want their boys to make a holiday decoration or gift for a teacher (or maybe for those talented sisters ;) ).

 

This falls under the "listen to the youth" aspect of scouting. You're not really dictating assignments. You're making suggestions based on where you think they would like to expand their talents. At the end of the day, if the youth would rather not do anything: no problem, no achievement, no recognition.

They are supposed to make something that they and their leader agree on, so the parent should not be involved in this.

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If the boys decided they hate lanyards and ask you to come up with another project, maybe you should. But, if they are just shrugging their shoulders, it's on their parents to think of another project that they should do. They might want their boys to make a holiday decoration or gift for a teacher (or maybe for those talented sisters ;) ).

 

This falls under the "listen to the youth" aspect of scouting. You're not really dictating assignments. You're making suggestions based on where you think they would like to expand their talents. At the end of the day, if the youth would rather not do anything: no problem, no achievement, no recognition.

A grey area: parents can serve as Akela. But, I'm not saying take the DL out of the loop, certainly as we move into Webelos we want the parents to take a lesser role. But, if it is truly a situation where the boys feel like you "dumped" this lanyard project on them, you want the help of the parents to encourage them to think of something else.

 

If it's just that they haven't made any effort, then pulling up other projects is just wasting your breath and their time.

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If the boys decided they hate lanyards and ask you to come up with another project, maybe you should. But, if they are just shrugging their shoulders, it's on their parents to think of another project that they should do. They might want their boys to make a holiday decoration or gift for a teacher (or maybe for those talented sisters ;) ).

 

This falls under the "listen to the youth" aspect of scouting. You're not really dictating assignments. You're making suggestions based on where you think they would like to expand their talents. At the end of the day, if the youth would rather not do anything: no problem, no achievement, no recognition.

The boys seemed fine with the prospect of doing the project- they just keep forgetting. The book says "Webelos leader", which does not equal "parent", unless the parent is the leader, but my son did all the same projects that the other boys did. I did ask them for ideas of what to make.

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If the boys decided they hate lanyards and ask you to come up with another project, maybe you should. But, if they are just shrugging their shoulders, it's on their parents to think of another project that they should do. They might want their boys to make a holiday decoration or gift for a teacher (or maybe for those talented sisters ;) ).

 

This falls under the "listen to the youth" aspect of scouting. You're not really dictating assignments. You're making suggestions based on where you think they would like to expand their talents. At the end of the day, if the youth would rather not do anything: no problem, no achievement, no recognition.

Q, I could be wrong, but I thought Akela was gone in Webelos.

 

Christineka, I would suggest always involving the parents to some degree. Maybe they don't want their some making some particular widget for some odd reason. As they say, there is one in every crowd. :)

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What about suggesting they finish the lanyard fir the next meeting or bring another similar craftsman project. Candle holder (salsa jars, tissue paper and white glue), duct tape wallet, or air dry clay pocket change holder

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First off, I would not supply them with any other craft materials to complete this requirement. If they want to do something else that meets the requirement, then they have to purchase their own materials. Tell them they can complete the project you assigned or they can pick one of the many suggestions provided in the Webelos handbook in the Craftsman section and do that. Otherwise, they will need to get permission from you to do something else.

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I would done this at the meeting, maybe while telling a scouting story.
We didn't because time had long run out. We have been very busy with visiting other troops, getting webelos earned, Arrow of Light almost earned, and then had a week off for the scouting broadcast.

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You may be more invested in them earning craftsman then the scout or the parent.

 

Do you have a poster for your meetings of where each boy is? I found my scouts to be quite competitive with each other on ocassion. (Sometimes the parents would get motivated by seeing the poster.)

 

Move on with your plan for the den and do the next thing you have planned. Stopping for incomplete projects will be boring. Adding a different one in later might be more fun (wooden whistles at camp, friendship bracelet, slide?).

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It sounds like you have unmotivated boys, plain and simple. It happens.

Move on with the original schedule for your den. From time to time, remind them that they are one lanyard away from earning their craftsman. If either of them bring up wanting to do something else with their own resources, listen to their idea, and, if it's good, encourage them to do it at home and bring it to you at your next meeting.

 

Chances are you will have other boys who fall behind in something else. Same procedure.

 

This is good preparation for life as a scout. Your buddies will get skills on some things. You'll get skilled on others.

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It sounds like you have unmotivated boys, plain and simple. It happens.

Move on with the original schedule for your den. From time to time, remind them that they are one lanyard away from earning their craftsman. If either of them bring up wanting to do something else with their own resources, listen to their idea, and, if it's good, encourage them to do it at home and bring it to you at your next meeting.

 

Chances are you will have other boys who fall behind in something else. Same procedure.

 

This is good preparation for life as a scout. Your buddies will get skills on some things. You'll get skilled on others.

I'm actually running out of boys. This is LDS scouting, where the boys age out on their birthdays. One boy turns 11 Jan 3rd, the second at the end of February and he is 2 badges away from having completed them all. The third oldest boy moves this month. The fourth has till mid-July. It's the 3rd and 4th that still need to finish those lanyards. 3rd boy needs to finish a lot of things. Now that I've got this all written up in front of me, I'm not going to worry about it. 4th boy can make the lanyard later. He has plenty of time to have all the meetings centered around him. (My son just needs to do make one more thing with wood and finish up family member.) After my son's birthday, I will be calling around the neighborhood to find a webelos den for my youngest boy to join. He shouldn't be alone.

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