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KayW

Can a parent with felony convictions attend troop meetings?

Can a parent with felony convictions attend troop meetings?  

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Guessing old Kay didn't like our responses......so she bailed.
"I did, got home in be by 12:50." Yep, you got enough sleep. Hope your coding goes well today. :)

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A convicted felon will - most likely - not pass a background check, and will not be accepted by BSA as a registered leader. However - depending on the circumstances of the conviction, and if the Charter Organization goes to bat for them, a person with a felony conviction in their past - MIGHT - be accepted by BSA as a registered member. Not very probable, but it is possible.

 

As for banning a felon parent from meetings - BSA says that you can NOT do that to a parent of a youth member.

 

From the Guide To Safe Scouting - "All aspects of the Scouting program are open to observation by parents and leaders".

 

A few things I am curious about -

 

Did this parent offer up information on his past, and present, activities? How do you know what he was convicted of, when he was convicted, and who he hangs out with? Did you use your law enforcement contacts to look into this man? Have you had him followed? Did you spread the "story" of his past to other families?

 

If this father is "rallying" parents to help the Troop, that you state has "little to no parental support", why are you so against it? Most Troops that need help would be THRILLED if one parent got the uninvolved parents off their backsides! Yet you are against ANY of the parents actually being involved in their son's Troop.

 

Gotta say - the whole thing sounds very fishy to me. It sounds like you have a personal issue with the one parent (however stalking, and gossip, is not the way to handle it). It also sounds like you and the other leaders (without any sons in the Troop) are afraid of losing your own personal Scouting group.

Well I did have a good fake ID and a 27 year old girlfriend senior year. :)

 

Again, we don't know much. Was he selling to 13 year old or 17 ? And what ?10 years ago I was well into my 30s. You are speculating he is younger, I older. Who knows ?

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
That falls in line with what Nike and I were told by our DE's the only disqualifying offenses are violent or sexual.

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
So Snowden could end up a SM. :)

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
I am thinking old snowden's days are numbered.

 

Just a matter of time for the right accident to happen.

 

So Snowden as an SM, make it easy for the team assigned, The rock at the Utah state park fell the other way......He didn't know it was a bad idea to use his shirt as a napkin in grizzly country, Blue Jeans are a great idea when canoeing or whitewater rafting.

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
I still thought it was a bad move to allow someone with a known history of embezzlement to handle Pack funds . . . I don't know BSA Paid staff think . . .

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
Council doesn't have anything to say about who does what job as long as the clear the background check......Well unless you openly question or disagree with a DE or SE, that will get you removed regardless of what the CO wants.

 

 

Not disagreeing with your NAE, I wouldn't want a thief managing any funds either.

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One our boys' fathers has been in and out of prison. (I believe he has ptsd.) We encourage him to participate, when he's not locked up. We follow a policy, where boys have 2 adults, 1 registered leader at all scout functions, including den meetings and outings. At pack meetings there are many adults around.

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One our boys' fathers has been in and out of prison. (I believe he has ptsd.) We encourage him to participate, when he's not locked up. We follow a policy, where boys have 2 adults, 1 registered leader at all scout functions, including den meetings and outings. At pack meetings there are many adults around.
bear requirement 7 Law enforcement is a big job. I suppose visiting the jail would count.

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It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.
Let Council hire him.

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The guidelines I use:

 

1) BSA policy as it pertains to scout leadership. If they can't get by the background check, end of story as a registered leader.

 

2) State/Federal laws as they pertain to who felons can associate with. Normally sex offenders cannot be around kids, schools and youth activity programs and felons cannot be around guns/weapons so they couldn't participate in gun-range activities. These are "requirements" that go beyond the incarceration period.

 

Otherwise if a parent has been convicted of a white-collar crime, for example, paid his/her debt to society, they can attend/participate with their child just like any other parent. Parolees are a grey area, and until they have paid their debt in full, I would suggest they not participate.

 

I have more problems with non-felons, i.e. the dad who's into drugs or alcohol, than some of the felons I know.

 

Stosh

 

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We have excellent leadership with little to no parental support. Now this particular parent is trying to rally the other parents blaming the dwindling numbers on our current leadership. Sadly without the leaders we have, there would be no leaders at all. We support and encourage all of our scouts the best we can and do our best to help them to have the best scouting experience possible. We do not have much support fro our council, but we do have an excellent CO. I think maybe trying to get the parents together and see what they want to do, because if our leadership steps down, there will be no leaders left, as none of our leaders have children in the troop. Thank you again for the input.
BD you thunder-stealer, you! :)

 

I've had to put up with a parent/leader like that for 7 years now. One of his sons just made Eagle. There isn't enough bandwidth for the stories I could tell. He's a real test of my blood pressure. Not a felon, but I can relate to what you're saying. Give him an app. and see if he can help "fix" things. My bet is "no".

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