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Basementdweller

Should units share the wealth?

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The amount of money raised is directly proportional to the effort put into it. This is one of the basic tenets of business. Either I set up a trap or I go out and beat the bushes. Everyone needs to decide how they are going to go about that.

 

The second tenet to consider is: Know your market. If one lives in an affluent community, maybe high-end popcorn is the ticket. But in a different neighborhood, those dynamics just aren't going to work. Get out there and market the neighborhoods. Find out what they want and then get it to them. Elderly neighborhood? How's about some snow shoveling, leaf raking, lawn mowing. Older homes may need winter storms put on. Maybe someone needs their house winterized. A 2 day job for them could be done in a couple of hours with enough hands on deck. Shopping for the shut ins? Sure, why not.

 

Oh, but that takes time, effort, and a major commitment. Yes it does. But do you want the money or not? Maybe it's time to seek out something more than the low-hanging fruit.

 

People are willing to pay for things that are necessary for them. Get off the sofa and out of the parlor and find out what that is and get it for them. It's a fundraiser for you, but it's a service project for them.

 

Stosh

Sometimes you'll get paid in money, and sometimes you'll get paid in "stuff" that you'll need to flog at the CO's semi-annual yard-sale.

 

In a truly depressed area, the target customers will be: the small business owners (window washing, bathroom cleaning, pick up the trash and sweep, stock shelves, babysit their kids, do chores at their homes), afterschool care & activities for schoolchildren until the parents get home from work, selling crafts online, selling food & drink at festivals and sports venues, monthly paper drive...

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The amount of money raised is directly proportional to the effort put into it. This is one of the basic tenets of business. Either I set up a trap or I go out and beat the bushes. Everyone needs to decide how they are going to go about that.

 

The second tenet to consider is: Know your market. If one lives in an affluent community, maybe high-end popcorn is the ticket. But in a different neighborhood, those dynamics just aren't going to work. Get out there and market the neighborhoods. Find out what they want and then get it to them. Elderly neighborhood? How's about some snow shoveling, leaf raking, lawn mowing. Older homes may need winter storms put on. Maybe someone needs their house winterized. A 2 day job for them could be done in a couple of hours with enough hands on deck. Shopping for the shut ins? Sure, why not.

 

Oh, but that takes time, effort, and a major commitment. Yes it does. But do you want the money or not? Maybe it's time to seek out something more than the low-hanging fruit.

 

People are willing to pay for things that are necessary for them. Get off the sofa and out of the parlor and find out what that is and get it for them. It's a fundraiser for you, but it's a service project for them.

 

Stosh

and the "free" car wash where you depend on donations

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The amount of money raised is directly proportional to the effort put into it. This is one of the basic tenets of business. Either I set up a trap or I go out and beat the bushes. Everyone needs to decide how they are going to go about that.

 

The second tenet to consider is: Know your market. If one lives in an affluent community, maybe high-end popcorn is the ticket. But in a different neighborhood, those dynamics just aren't going to work. Get out there and market the neighborhoods. Find out what they want and then get it to them. Elderly neighborhood? How's about some snow shoveling, leaf raking, lawn mowing. Older homes may need winter storms put on. Maybe someone needs their house winterized. A 2 day job for them could be done in a couple of hours with enough hands on deck. Shopping for the shut ins? Sure, why not.

 

Oh, but that takes time, effort, and a major commitment. Yes it does. But do you want the money or not? Maybe it's time to seek out something more than the low-hanging fruit.

 

People are willing to pay for things that are necessary for them. Get off the sofa and out of the parlor and find out what that is and get it for them. It's a fundraiser for you, but it's a service project for them.

 

Stosh

There are homeless people who make more money than I do panhandling. :) I'm not suggesting that as an option, but a little creativity can go a long way.

 

Stosh

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The amount of money raised is directly proportional to the effort put into it. This is one of the basic tenets of business. Either I set up a trap or I go out and beat the bushes. Everyone needs to decide how they are going to go about that.

 

The second tenet to consider is: Know your market. If one lives in an affluent community, maybe high-end popcorn is the ticket. But in a different neighborhood, those dynamics just aren't going to work. Get out there and market the neighborhoods. Find out what they want and then get it to them. Elderly neighborhood? How's about some snow shoveling, leaf raking, lawn mowing. Older homes may need winter storms put on. Maybe someone needs their house winterized. A 2 day job for them could be done in a couple of hours with enough hands on deck. Shopping for the shut ins? Sure, why not.

 

Oh, but that takes time, effort, and a major commitment. Yes it does. But do you want the money or not? Maybe it's time to seek out something more than the low-hanging fruit.

 

People are willing to pay for things that are necessary for them. Get off the sofa and out of the parlor and find out what that is and get it for them. It's a fundraiser for you, but it's a service project for them.

 

Stosh

JBlake:

How much do you make panhandling?

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The amount of money raised is directly proportional to the effort put into it. This is one of the basic tenets of business. Either I set up a trap or I go out and beat the bushes. Everyone needs to decide how they are going to go about that.

 

The second tenet to consider is: Know your market. If one lives in an affluent community, maybe high-end popcorn is the ticket. But in a different neighborhood, those dynamics just aren't going to work. Get out there and market the neighborhoods. Find out what they want and then get it to them. Elderly neighborhood? How's about some snow shoveling, leaf raking, lawn mowing. Older homes may need winter storms put on. Maybe someone needs their house winterized. A 2 day job for them could be done in a couple of hours with enough hands on deck. Shopping for the shut ins? Sure, why not.

 

Oh, but that takes time, effort, and a major commitment. Yes it does. But do you want the money or not? Maybe it's time to seek out something more than the low-hanging fruit.

 

People are willing to pay for things that are necessary for them. Get off the sofa and out of the parlor and find out what that is and get it for them. It's a fundraiser for you, but it's a service project for them.

 

Stosh

:) Caught me on that one. Can't be dangling my participles on this forum.

 

Love it!

 

Stosh

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