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EagleScout441

Tent vs Hammock

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Both my son and I use hammocks and love them. The cons are well stated above. A down underquilt is an essential investment against the cold but will set you back some serious cash--more than the hammock. But it is worth it for the comfort, and the weight when backpacking.

 

One con to add is that I find I have to use the porta-tree more frequently in the hammock than in the tent for some reason, and others have reported this as well. Try to avoid drinking water long before bedtime.

JoeBob, yes it does. So with a top quilt or unzipped hammock inside it's full coverage. My son manages to wiggle himself into a sleeping bag but I'm not always quite that coordinates.

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I have been using a hammock at Scout Camp for over 10 years with no issue. My kids use one too. Generally we have about 4-6 using one for some if not all the nights. This year the boys scheduled a Hammock Campout for the Spring. We will be DIYing hammocks with the boys interested. Living on the East Coast, haven't had issues with not being able to hang. When I asked prior to camp this Summer, the Camp Directors response, "We have plenty of trees." I noticed several staff were in hammocks as well.

 

As far as insulation goes. You can survive using a pad in the hammock. I did that for nine years. This past year I have made underquilts using military Poncho Liners and old down jackets. I do have a heavy duty down UQ for the winter. There are also synthetic alternatives to down which keep costs down.

 

I have heard some Scouters say that hammock camping does not belong in Scouting because it violates the buddy system. That is nuts. Many of the older scouts already use one man tents. Also we have had scouts bunk there hammocks to share one tarp.

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I have been using a hammock at Scout Camp for over 10 years with no issue. My kids use one too. Generally we have about 4-6 using one for some if not all the nights. This year the boys scheduled a Hammock Campout for the Spring. We will be DIYing hammocks with the boys interested. Living on the East Coast, haven't had issues with not being able to hang. When I asked prior to camp this Summer, the Camp Directors response, "We have plenty of trees." I noticed several staff were in hammocks as well.

 

As far as insulation goes. You can survive using a pad in the hammock. I did that for nine years. This past year I have made underquilts using military Poncho Liners and old down jackets. I do have a heavy duty down UQ for the winter. There are also synthetic alternatives to down which keep costs down.

 

I have heard some Scouters say that hammock camping does not belong in Scouting because it violates the buddy system. That is nuts. Many of the older scouts already use one man tents. Also we have had scouts bunk there hammocks to share one tarp.

Forgot to add. I also have two types of stands to allow me to hang in an open field (Camporees) one is only 2 1/2 pounds, light enough for simple backpacking.

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Really???? Doesn't belong in scouting?????

 

When they spend 4 weeks at summer camp, you want a decent nights sleep.....I have 4 weeks in my hammock this summer alone.

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I took the plunge over the weekend and bought a Grand Truck skeeter beater. I took a short nap in it Saturday afternoon. The maiden voyage is in a few weeks. I'm trying to decide on a dedicated fly or just a tarp.

 

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I took the plunge over the weekend and bought a Grand Truck skeeter beater. I took a short nap in it Saturday afternoon. The maiden voyage is in a few weeks. I'm trying to decide on a dedicated fly or just a tarp.

I've been using the same $4 tarp for 2 years now. It doesn't pack too well; larger than the whole rest of the hammock. I'm thinking of upgrading to a fly.

But if you're not sure you want to commit to being a tree-hanger, go with the tarp first. You can always re-purpose it over your woodpile...

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I took the plunge over the weekend and bought a Grand Truck skeeter beater. I took a short nap in it Saturday afternoon. The maiden voyage is in a few weeks. I'm trying to decide on a dedicated fly or just a tarp.

The tarp option is in the lead as I have no shortage of them around the house.

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I took the plunge over the weekend and bought a Grand Truck skeeter beater. I took a short nap in it Saturday afternoon. The maiden voyage is in a few weeks. I'm trying to decide on a dedicated fly or just a tarp.

Welcome to the hanging club!

 

You'll have to report how you like the way it hangs/lays. Since it does not have the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey I think you will need to hang it loose to keep it stable (so it doesn't flip over). So, that might also give you more of the "banana" feel when you lay in it. Not sure because I haven't tried one but it's a nice price point if it works so let us know.

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Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.

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Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.
You need to lay in the Hennessy on a diagonal. If you are feeling the line on your back it means your are laying in it wrong.

 

Essentially, when you feel the line, shift your feet to the right and your head to the left until the line magically goes away and you are laying nearly flat.

 

The only thing i have to do with the hammock is put a small pillow under my knees because there is still a very small amount of "banana" to the hammock. You don't feel curved at all when you are laying in it right--you feel as if you are completely flat and cradled. But after a few hours I can feel pressure on the backs of my knees. If we are drop-camping I will bring a small pillow; if we are backpacking I will just stuff a jacket into a small dry bag or something.

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Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.
I'll look for a different hammock if that's the case. You said that "You don't feel curved at all when you are laying in it right," well, I like that curve, it actually helps me sleep better, believe it or not. I don't think ENO hammocks have that, maybe I'll look into one of those.

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Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.
If you want the traditional hammock curve then I would suggest something without a ridge line, like a military jungle hammock or even the aforementioned "skeeter beater." As long as you don't tighten the lines real taut you will hang below the center of gravity and be fine.

 

The Hennessy is designed to lay fairly flat, and some hammocks such as bridge hammocks are designed to be completely flat.

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Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.
Thanks Brewmeister, Roy.

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Just FYI, Hennessey is having their annual demo model sale right now. They have their stuff listed on eBay. Averages about $100 off per hammock, with most having some sort of minor repair.

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