Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
fotoscout

Jambo feedback from the final day -Some nice stuff but it sucked.

Recommended Posts

In no particular order, here are some of my thoughts on the Jamboree. I was on staff (high-power rifle range) the entire time and showered most days. I bought a solar shower at the trading post for $25 or so and filled it up and left it in the sun (and rain sometimes) during the day and showered at the end of the day. The first time I used the solar shower the water in the bag was 110 degrees (nifty little thermometer built into the bag) and it was a GREAT shower. I had several days where the water in the bag was 140 degrees. I had to hold the bag under the ambient water shower for a few minutes to cool it. I had great warm showers, great hot water with which to shave, and all and all had no complaints about my shower situation. It would have absolutely sucked to not have that solar shower. There was one day where it was super hot throughout the day and I did a shower sans the solar shower. It was brisk, for sure. I can see this being an issue for future Jamborees.

 

I was in Base Camp Echo and the food was good. Lunches sucked for the most part. I grabbed an apple or two and a banana at breakfast and brought them along for lunch - wish I had thought to grab a bagel or some bread or something. Breakfast and dinner was very good. Dining hall staff were great - good spirits, great job.

 

Staff tents? Not bad at all. So much I'm thinking about buying one or two of those wall tents they have for sale. Would be great for those "drive and camp" campouts we seem to do so much of back home. The cots? Discobeds. Surprisingly comfortable. Shoot, I'm thinking of buying one or two of them as well.

 

We had buses laid on for the shooting sports staff as it was a 90-120 minute walk each way to the range. I was disappointed that the participants had so much walking to do - not because of the physical fitness aspect of it but because of the time involved. I gotta believe this is going to have a huge impact on whether folks return. There was a lot of walking for everybody. I was pleased to see that the trading post sold baby powder. Or better put, my boys were pleased I could buy some baby powder. Pack a big container of it if you attend next time.

 

Speaking of trading posts? The thing I bought the most? Those Thorlo socks. I brought 5 pair down with me. And a bunch of the green BSA socks. I wore my first five pairs on the first five days. I tried the green socks for one day. Ah, no. Funny, as I use them on troop campouts all the time. But I don't walk that much on troop campouts. An estimate, but I figured I did ten miles of walking each day. As an aside, I lost 10 lbs at Jambo. I was too cheap to send my laundry to Granny's Laundry (really, that was the name of the local concession offering laundry service in Echo base camp). I did the old wash 'em in a bucket. I hung everything out to dry and it was a great sunny day the next day. I was feeling pretty smart until it poured down rain that afternoon while I was still at the rifle range. Damn. I ended up just buying a set of socks for each day. I guess it would have been cheaper to pay the $10 to Granny, but it was essentially a two-day turnaround. Anyhow, I bought new socks. I was a little disappointed that the socks in the trading post were a few dollars cheaper than the same thing they were selling online at ScoutingStuff.org - but only because I had bought five pairs beforehand. Ah, don't look a gift horse in the mouth I guess. I bought a jambo chair (even thought I had brought one of those really cool REI camp chairs portable camp chairs they were selling at the Scout store). The portable chair just wasn't comfortable after a long day on the range. I also bought a lightweight rain jacket and a nifty pair of Jambo shorts.

 

I traded my Shooting Sports hat for a freaken' awesome hat from an adult Scouter from North Carolina. Thanks man! You know who you are. I'm groovin' to your hat.

 

The phone charging stations were all solar - in case you wondered why you got a 10th of a charge after 2 or 3 hours on the charging station. Everybody plugged their devices into the outlets in the shower house... ummm... 15 or 20 amps for 20 devices all daisy chained together? Do the math - that didn't work out well either. In Base Camp Echo they had a few real charging stations across from the trading post that had portable batteries with 650 or 850 amp batteries and those did the trick. I don't think that many people even realized they were there.

 

Broken bones? No idea how factual this is, but I heard there were 800 broken bones at the Jamboree - many at the BMX site, with a significant percentage at the same place on the course. I get you'll have broken bones at something like this but do wonder if course design had something to do with it. It would have been nice to have somebody step forward and say "um, yeah, lots of broken bones at this part in the course - we're going to change it or close down this part of the course." Now I got no idea whether that would be a realistic thing to do or not, but as both a parent and a Scouter, I'd like to think there was somebody thinking about this. There were also two fatalities at the Jamboree - both older Scouters. One a few days before the Scouts arrived and one during the second week. My understanding is that they were adults with a history of heart problems. Again, no real specific information on these, all rumor, but fairly certain there were two guys that didn't come home. Sympathies and prayers go out to those two guys and their families. I mention this because I've seen some threads that talked about the BMI and weight and health history and all that. Again, no idea whether these were factors in the two deaths, but I think it safe to assume it likely.

 

We closed the rifle range once or twice when there was nearby lightning. We had one group that had waited in line for an hour or two and had just completed the safety briefing and were put on the line. I was the RSO and had just given the command to "aim and align rifles" (just prior to "load and fire") when we had to call a cease fire. The operations folks told us the kids had to clear the hill and boogie down the hill. No idea where they were supposed to go to seek shelter, perhaps the big tents at the bottom of the hill. The hill, by the way? We all called it cardiac hill because it was a hump to get from the bottom of the hill to the rifle ranges. I could easily see a kid humping to the top of the hill, waiting in line, getting on the range, having the range closed & sent to the bottom of the hill saying "i'm not walking back up there". Unfortunate. Having said that, we sent probably 7500 kids through the high-power range - .223 and .308 rifles. The boys that made the hump early and got there first thing in the morning got to shoot lots. I told the boys that the early bird got the ammo and if there was no line, they were welcome to stay on the line. One kid in particular stands out - he was on the range at least three different days. I did wonder what he was giving up to be there, but he was passionate about shooting. I bet that kid easily shot 500-600 rounds of .308. That's saying a lot since it was in increments of 10 rounds. I did give some thought to saying "come on kid, hit the road, go see the rest of the Jamboree", but at the end of the day, it was his Jamboree and that's what he wanted to do. We had Scouters from around the world - I had boys (and girls) from Australia, UK, Sweden, Denmark, Russia, Spain, Thailand, Taiwan, Bangladesh, and a bunch of other countries I can't recall.

 

Great information. Thanks Dan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In no particular order, here are some of my thoughts on the Jamboree. I was on staff (high-power rifle range) the entire time and showered most days. I bought a solar shower at the trading post for $25 or so and filled it up and left it in the sun (and rain sometimes) during the day and showered at the end of the day. The first time I used the solar shower the water in the bag was 110 degrees (nifty little thermometer built into the bag) and it was a GREAT shower. I had several days where the water in the bag was 140 degrees. I had to hold the bag under the ambient water shower for a few minutes to cool it. I had great warm showers, great hot water with which to shave, and all and all had no complaints about my shower situation. It would have absolutely sucked to not have that solar shower. There was one day where it was super hot throughout the day and I did a shower sans the solar shower. It was brisk, for sure. I can see this being an issue for future Jamborees.

 

I was in Base Camp Echo and the food was good. Lunches sucked for the most part. I grabbed an apple or two and a banana at breakfast and brought them along for lunch - wish I had thought to grab a bagel or some bread or something. Breakfast and dinner was very good. Dining hall staff were great - good spirits, great job.

 

Staff tents? Not bad at all. So much I'm thinking about buying one or two of those wall tents they have for sale. Would be great for those "drive and camp" campouts we seem to do so much of back home. The cots? Discobeds. Surprisingly comfortable. Shoot, I'm thinking of buying one or two of them as well.

 

We had buses laid on for the shooting sports staff as it was a 90-120 minute walk each way to the range. I was disappointed that the participants had so much walking to do - not because of the physical fitness aspect of it but because of the time involved. I gotta believe this is going to have a huge impact on whether folks return. There was a lot of walking for everybody. I was pleased to see that the trading post sold baby powder. Or better put, my boys were pleased I could buy some baby powder. Pack a big container of it if you attend next time.

 

Speaking of trading posts? The thing I bought the most? Those Thorlo socks. I brought 5 pair down with me. And a bunch of the green BSA socks. I wore my first five pairs on the first five days. I tried the green socks for one day. Ah, no. Funny, as I use them on troop campouts all the time. But I don't walk that much on troop campouts. An estimate, but I figured I did ten miles of walking each day. As an aside, I lost 10 lbs at Jambo. I was too cheap to send my laundry to Granny's Laundry (really, that was the name of the local concession offering laundry service in Echo base camp). I did the old wash 'em in a bucket. I hung everything out to dry and it was a great sunny day the next day. I was feeling pretty smart until it poured down rain that afternoon while I was still at the rifle range. Damn. I ended up just buying a set of socks for each day. I guess it would have been cheaper to pay the $10 to Granny, but it was essentially a two-day turnaround. Anyhow, I bought new socks. I was a little disappointed that the socks in the trading post were a few dollars cheaper than the same thing they were selling online at ScoutingStuff.org - but only because I had bought five pairs beforehand. Ah, don't look a gift horse in the mouth I guess. I bought a jambo chair (even thought I had brought one of those really cool REI camp chairs portable camp chairs they were selling at the Scout store). The portable chair just wasn't comfortable after a long day on the range. I also bought a lightweight rain jacket and a nifty pair of Jambo shorts.

 

I traded my Shooting Sports hat for a freaken' awesome hat from an adult Scouter from North Carolina. Thanks man! You know who you are. I'm groovin' to your hat.

 

The phone charging stations were all solar - in case you wondered why you got a 10th of a charge after 2 or 3 hours on the charging station. Everybody plugged their devices into the outlets in the shower house... ummm... 15 or 20 amps for 20 devices all daisy chained together? Do the math - that didn't work out well either. In Base Camp Echo they had a few real charging stations across from the trading post that had portable batteries with 650 or 850 amp batteries and those did the trick. I don't think that many people even realized they were there.

 

Broken bones? No idea how factual this is, but I heard there were 800 broken bones at the Jamboree - many at the BMX site, with a significant percentage at the same place on the course. I get you'll have broken bones at something like this but do wonder if course design had something to do with it. It would have been nice to have somebody step forward and say "um, yeah, lots of broken bones at this part in the course - we're going to change it or close down this part of the course." Now I got no idea whether that would be a realistic thing to do or not, but as both a parent and a Scouter, I'd like to think there was somebody thinking about this. There were also two fatalities at the Jamboree - both older Scouters. One a few days before the Scouts arrived and one during the second week. My understanding is that they were adults with a history of heart problems. Again, no real specific information on these, all rumor, but fairly certain there were two guys that didn't come home. Sympathies and prayers go out to those two guys and their families. I mention this because I've seen some threads that talked about the BMI and weight and health history and all that. Again, no idea whether these were factors in the two deaths, but I think it safe to assume it likely.

 

We closed the rifle range once or twice when there was nearby lightning. We had one group that had waited in line for an hour or two and had just completed the safety briefing and were put on the line. I was the RSO and had just given the command to "aim and align rifles" (just prior to "load and fire") when we had to call a cease fire. The operations folks told us the kids had to clear the hill and boogie down the hill. No idea where they were supposed to go to seek shelter, perhaps the big tents at the bottom of the hill. The hill, by the way? We all called it cardiac hill because it was a hump to get from the bottom of the hill to the rifle ranges. I could easily see a kid humping to the top of the hill, waiting in line, getting on the range, having the range closed & sent to the bottom of the hill saying "i'm not walking back up there". Unfortunate. Having said that, we sent probably 7500 kids through the high-power range - .223 and .308 rifles. The boys that made the hump early and got there first thing in the morning got to shoot lots. I told the boys that the early bird got the ammo and if there was no line, they were welcome to stay on the line. One kid in particular stands out - he was on the range at least three different days. I did wonder what he was giving up to be there, but he was passionate about shooting. I bet that kid easily shot 500-600 rounds of .308. That's saying a lot since it was in increments of 10 rounds. I did give some thought to saying "come on kid, hit the road, go see the rest of the Jamboree", but at the end of the day, it was his Jamboree and that's what he wanted to do. We had Scouters from around the world - I had boys (and girls) from Australia, UK, Sweden, Denmark, Russia, Spain, Thailand, Taiwan, Bangladesh, and a bunch of other countries I can't recall.

 

I sat on the bus one morning late in the Jamboree next to a nurse from the skateboard park and she told me they had their share of broken bones - mostly sprains, though. And a lot of collar bones. She told me that she had heard there were many more broken bones at BMX. It's on the internet... it must be true! I'm sure there is an after action report put together by the risk management people. Sure would like to see that as I'm a curious busybody. But I'll bet that'll never see the light of day.

 

I'll admit that I was a little concerned about my son participating in the BMX events. I saw my son the first day and then that was it. I ran into some kids from his Jambo troop at the beginning of the last week and asked them "Hey, does Jack have a cast?" and they all said "Nope." Phwew. I felt a lot better because I knew his schedule for the remainder of the Jamboree and was pretty sure he didn't have time to fit in a day at the BMX track. When he got home I asked him (he's 13 and a 1st Class Scout) whether he thought about going over to the BMX track and he said, "Dad, I saw a couple of kids with casts on and they got banged up at BMX. I just didn't think it was worth it." I can't tell you how proud I was of my son. We had a good talk about risk/reward and peer pressure and, again, I was so pleased he was thinking it through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at the Jamboree as a leader with a troop and my son was there as an over eighteen Venturer.

 

Adults cutting in line. The consensus was that with all the restrictions due to weather and shortage of staff, adults kept away from the HA program areas. We did the nature trails, Summit Center etc. One thing to note was that the Scouts were identified by red bands on their credentials, adults by yellow bands and Venturers with green bands. One quirk was that Venturers over eighteen were issued yellow bands and used adult facilities. Perhaps these were the people that the Scouts thought were adults cutting in?

 

Anybody with a “curriculum ticket†went to the front of the line and some areas issued VIP passes to frequent visitors that let them cut the line. We had two Scouts receive VIP passes for the skateboard area. So, any over 18 Venturer with a curriculum ticket or VIP pass might have been mistaken for an adult cutting in.

 

Our contingent troop was made up of Scouts from about six Council troops. Our only scheduled days were the ones advertised in advance; day of service, Summit trek, curriculum time and any offsite activity the Scout had bought. I suppose the opening and closing shows might be considered scheduled but we let Scouts bail when they had enough of them (who booked a country and western band for a youth event???) Our SM insisted that every Scout attend a worship service or visit the religious exhibits on the Sunday morning. The rest of the time we let the Scouts do whatever they wanted until roll call at 9:30pm (a Summit-set time, we would have preferred 10 or 10:15).

 

I’m not Catholic but took the Catholic Scouts in the group to Mass. It was heartwarming to see about 10,000 Scouts and adults standing in one heck of a rain storm to attend. The celebrant for the service was Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States (basically, the Vatican’s ambassador to the US). There were a number of other high ranking Catholic clergy in attendance. Archbishop Vigano mentioned that he had told the Pope was going to West Virginia for the Jamboree instead of World Youth Day in Brazil. :-) So, hey, the Pope knew about this Jambo. :-)

 

The weather was a pain, no doubt about that. It seemed that lightning came in every afternoon and shut down the aerial and water programs. Due to the staff shortages, program ran from (I think) 9am until 5pm, not the 8am to 8pm I was talking up a couple of years ago during recruiting drives. A lot of frustration from yoots getting told “sorry†after standing in line for quite some time.

 

Our view of the Day of Service was that it dovetailed with how troops work in our Council. Most of the boys enjoyed it, a few loved it and, of course, we hand two or three that hated being there. Our project was in Fayetteville and was useful. One thing the adults had talked about was the day being useful to the community and not a make-work event and our project passed that test. I heard through the grapevine that one Crew’s project was changed at the last minute and involved helping to save a school from flooding!

 

I took a 4 gallon solar shower and had hot or warm water all but one day. Ambient temperature meant cold, no two ways about that. Most boys took cold showers at the peak heat of the afternoon and were ok with that. We had a couple of stinkers that had to get big hints to clean up their act.

 

Feedback from our Scouts was that overall it was great. Only gripe was the weather shutting things down. My Venturer said it was a lot of fun but didn’t match the advertising. I agree with that statement as I was going out and pushing the National line and then having to talk about the scaled back version that was delivered.

 

The one big change I would like to see National make is getting more staff so they can deliver 8am to 8pm program. I have no idea if lowering the price to attend would do it or not. I heard different views from different staff so perhaps each area would have to do its own assessment as to what would be needed to increase staffing levels.

 

I spoke with somebody in D’s medical tent on the last day. Single biggest source of problems was the heat and boys not drinking enough water. She said that accounted for over 50% of the problems. BMX was cited as top source of physical injuries with some Scouts getting broken bones. The helicopter flew around quite a bit but I don’t think it was ever used in anger. The ambulances did have to take a few Scouts off site for treatment but most were fixed up on site.

 

I don’t know how true this is, but was told a few boys were sent home for vulgar remarks to the female Venturers.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was at the Jamboree as a leader with a troop and my son was there as an over eighteen Venturer.

 

Adults cutting in line. The consensus was that with all the restrictions due to weather and shortage of staff, adults kept away from the HA program areas. We did the nature trails, Summit Center etc. One thing to note was that the Scouts were identified by red bands on their credentials, adults by yellow bands and Venturers with green bands. One quirk was that Venturers over eighteen were issued yellow bands and used adult facilities. Perhaps these were the people that the Scouts thought were adults cutting in?

 

Anybody with a “curriculum ticket†went to the front of the line and some areas issued VIP passes to frequent visitors that let them cut the line. We had two Scouts receive VIP passes for the skateboard area. So, any over 18 Venturer with a curriculum ticket or VIP pass might have been mistaken for an adult cutting in.

 

Our contingent troop was made up of Scouts from about six Council troops. Our only scheduled days were the ones advertised in advance; day of service, Summit trek, curriculum time and any offsite activity the Scout had bought. I suppose the opening and closing shows might be considered scheduled but we let Scouts bail when they had enough of them (who booked a country and western band for a youth event???) Our SM insisted that every Scout attend a worship service or visit the religious exhibits on the Sunday morning. The rest of the time we let the Scouts do whatever they wanted until roll call at 9:30pm (a Summit-set time, we would have preferred 10 or 10:15).

 

I’m not Catholic but took the Catholic Scouts in the group to Mass. It was heartwarming to see about 10,000 Scouts and adults standing in one heck of a rain storm to attend. The celebrant for the service was Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States (basically, the Vatican’s ambassador to the US). There were a number of other high ranking Catholic clergy in attendance. Archbishop Vigano mentioned that he had told the Pope was going to West Virginia for the Jamboree instead of World Youth Day in Brazil. :-) So, hey, the Pope knew about this Jambo. :-)

 

The weather was a pain, no doubt about that. It seemed that lightning came in every afternoon and shut down the aerial and water programs. Due to the staff shortages, program ran from (I think) 9am until 5pm, not the 8am to 8pm I was talking up a couple of years ago during recruiting drives. A lot of frustration from yoots getting told “sorry†after standing in line for quite some time.

 

Our view of the Day of Service was that it dovetailed with how troops work in our Council. Most of the boys enjoyed it, a few loved it and, of course, we hand two or three that hated being there. Our project was in Fayetteville and was useful. One thing the adults had talked about was the day being useful to the community and not a make-work event and our project passed that test. I heard through the grapevine that one Crew’s project was changed at the last minute and involved helping to save a school from flooding!

 

I took a 4 gallon solar shower and had hot or warm water all but one day. Ambient temperature meant cold, no two ways about that. Most boys took cold showers at the peak heat of the afternoon and were ok with that. We had a couple of stinkers that had to get big hints to clean up their act.

 

Feedback from our Scouts was that overall it was great. Only gripe was the weather shutting things down. My Venturer said it was a lot of fun but didn’t match the advertising. I agree with that statement as I was going out and pushing the National line and then having to talk about the scaled back version that was delivered.

 

The one big change I would like to see National make is getting more staff so they can deliver 8am to 8pm program. I have no idea if lowering the price to attend would do it or not. I heard different views from different staff so perhaps each area would have to do its own assessment as to what would be needed to increase staffing levels.

 

I spoke with somebody in D’s medical tent on the last day. Single biggest source of problems was the heat and boys not drinking enough water. She said that accounted for over 50% of the problems. BMX was cited as top source of physical injuries with some Scouts getting broken bones. The helicopter flew around quite a bit but I don’t think it was ever used in anger. The ambulances did have to take a few Scouts off site for treatment but most were fixed up on site.

 

I don’t know how true this is, but was told a few boys were sent home for vulgar remarks to the female Venturers.

What is a VIP frequent visitor ? That kind of sounds bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
like you tex...I wouldn't mind volunteering, But $800 is way too much. I never understood why they needed to make a profit off of the the staff......

 

So how much did it cost to staff at ap hill????

Extra $500... Tents, signs, cots, biiiig duffle you can use again, three days of really great entertainment (no fooling, Mark Rivera was great) ( and Third Door Down was pretty good too) (and the King of Sweden and Mike Rowe were no slouches either), Showers... well, scratch that..... various (volunteer staffed) exhibits and activities, hikes in the woods, a really grand fireworks display, time away from the usual stuff, lots of Scouts to smile at and to have smile back at you, (depending on your "duty") rewarding and new challenging solutions to find, camping out (even on such a grand scale), a bag of patches and pins to take home to remind you of all the mud and rain and ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumors.... Things I ""heard"""...... Scouts sent home for vulgar language.... Entire Troop quarantined for a flu outbreak... AT&T VIPs given priority on the Big Zip....Certain glow in the dark patches are radioactive and will give you cancer (and are thus more desirable)....bunch of Scouts sent home for showing porn on their schmart phones in the shower house.... a certain political candidate predicted that the Jambo was going to be used for Emergency Mass Evacuation training....there is no poison ivy in West Virginia....there is a 60% chance of rain this afternoon (bright sunshine ).... Look at that radar, the lightning is going to the north of us..... they are going to combine the Pet Care and Cooking merit badges...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rumors.... Things I ""heard"""...... Scouts sent home for vulgar language.... Entire Troop quarantined for a flu outbreak... AT&T VIPs given priority on the Big Zip....Certain glow in the dark patches are radioactive and will give you cancer (and are thus more desirable)....bunch of Scouts sent home for showing porn on their schmart phones in the shower house.... a certain political candidate predicted that the Jambo was going to be used for Emergency Mass Evacuation training....there is no poison ivy in West Virginia....there is a 60% chance of rain this afternoon (bright sunshine ).... Look at that radar, the lightning is going to the north of us..... they are going to combine the Pet Care and Cooking merit badges...
ha ha ... the best one I heard was Scouts couldn't visit F to trade patches because the co-ed Scouts and Venturers were having orgies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can confirm part of the quarantine thing. We were one of several troops quarantined by the WV Health Department for a GI viral outbreak. They came in and bleached all our cooking gear and the nearby shower houses. Our troop was on its trek day (those well enough) and they isolated them at the top of the climb and bleached all their water bottles. None of which did any good, by a few days after the Jambo we were above 90% infection rate and gleefully spreading it to family and friends.

 

There was also a candidate for Nevada Governor who had some bats@#$ crazy stuff to say about a mass something or other threat/training. http://nevadagovernor2014.com/national-scout-jamboree-2013-false-flag-insider-warning-nevada-governor-2014-david-lory-vanderbeek/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can confirm part of the quarantine thing. We were one of several troops quarantined by the WV Health Department for a GI viral outbreak. They came in and bleached all our cooking gear and the nearby shower houses. Our troop was on its trek day (those well enough) and they isolated them at the top of the climb and bleached all their water bottles. None of which did any good, by a few days after the Jambo we were above 90% infection rate and gleefully spreading it to family and friends.

 

There was also a candidate for Nevada Governor who had some bats@#$ crazy stuff to say about a mass something or other threat/training. http://nevadagovernor2014.com/national-scout-jamboree-2013-false-flag-insider-warning-nevada-governor-2014-david-lory-vanderbeek/

Wow and I thought Glen Beck was nuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rumors.... Things I ""heard"""...... Scouts sent home for vulgar language.... Entire Troop quarantined for a flu outbreak... AT&T VIPs given priority on the Big Zip....Certain glow in the dark patches are radioactive and will give you cancer (and are thus more desirable)....bunch of Scouts sent home for showing porn on their schmart phones in the shower house.... a certain political candidate predicted that the Jambo was going to be used for Emergency Mass Evacuation training....there is no poison ivy in West Virginia....there is a 60% chance of rain this afternoon (bright sunshine ).... Look at that radar, the lightning is going to the north of us..... they are going to combine the Pet Care and Cooking merit badges...
In 2001, the troop about two campsites down the row from mine got quarantined for a flu outbreak. They put two port-o-potties in the middle of the campsite, plastic-wrapped the perimeter, and kept everyone in the site for a few days. We had a dad from our troop working in the medical tent and hearing the doctors describe it, it was a total nightmare for all involved. It's a bummer it happened again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can confirm part of the quarantine thing. We were one of several troops quarantined by the WV Health Department for a GI viral outbreak. They came in and bleached all our cooking gear and the nearby shower houses. Our troop was on its trek day (those well enough) and they isolated them at the top of the climb and bleached all their water bottles. None of which did any good, by a few days after the Jambo we were above 90% infection rate and gleefully spreading it to family and friends.

 

There was also a candidate for Nevada Governor who had some bats@#$ crazy stuff to say about a mass something or other threat/training. http://nevadagovernor2014.com/national-scout-jamboree-2013-false-flag-insider-warning-nevada-governor-2014-david-lory-vanderbeek/

Hmmmm, WV National Guard training exercise, helicopters flying at all hours of the day, clearly this guy is onto something! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can confirm part of the quarantine thing. We were one of several troops quarantined by the WV Health Department for a GI viral outbreak. They came in and bleached all our cooking gear and the nearby shower houses. Our troop was on its trek day (those well enough) and they isolated them at the top of the climb and bleached all their water bottles. None of which did any good, by a few days after the Jambo we were above 90% infection rate and gleefully spreading it to family and friends.

 

There was also a candidate for Nevada Governor who had some bats@#$ crazy stuff to say about a mass something or other threat/training. http://nevadagovernor2014.com/national-scout-jamboree-2013-false-flag-insider-warning-nevada-governor-2014-david-lory-vanderbeek/

I especially liked

 

" The military source decided to come forward because of the Boston bombing and the evidence that it was staged by the FBI. "

 

The sad part is this nut is an Eagle. Time for a Mental Health MB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can confirm part of the quarantine thing. We were one of several troops quarantined by the WV Health Department for a GI viral outbreak. They came in and bleached all our cooking gear and the nearby shower houses. Our troop was on its trek day (those well enough) and they isolated them at the top of the climb and bleached all their water bottles. None of which did any good, by a few days after the Jambo we were above 90% infection rate and gleefully spreading it to family and friends.

 

There was also a candidate for Nevada Governor who had some bats@#$ crazy stuff to say about a mass something or other threat/training. http://nevadagovernor2014.com/national-scout-jamboree-2013-false-flag-insider-warning-nevada-governor-2014-david-lory-vanderbeek/

KDD: Was this guy really an Eagle?

Or was he one of those "Navy Seal, Spec OPs, ex-Ranger guys with three Purple Hearts and two Silver Stars" with no paper trail because the government erased it to protect the innocent?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rumors.... Things I ""heard"""...... Scouts sent home for vulgar language.... Entire Troop quarantined for a flu outbreak... AT&T VIPs given priority on the Big Zip....Certain glow in the dark patches are radioactive and will give you cancer (and are thus more desirable)....bunch of Scouts sent home for showing porn on their schmart phones in the shower house.... a certain political candidate predicted that the Jambo was going to be used for Emergency Mass Evacuation training....there is no poison ivy in West Virginia....there is a 60% chance of rain this afternoon (bright sunshine ).... Look at that radar, the lightning is going to the north of us..... they are going to combine the Pet Care and Cooking merit badges...
My daughter was in F subcamp, and said there were no orgies, but a few kids did get sent home for sex in the woods. She did come home saying she has a boyfriend now, we'll see how the long distance thing works with 15yo kids. The crew advisor said F did receive a lot of foot traffic from "non-residents". However all were courteous and respectful. The females, both foriegn and domestic drew them in to F. Apparently the Korean contingent had a party every night, and steel drums were played by the T&T contingent. I sent my daughter with a handful of patches, she came with all of them and a handful more. The

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rumors.... Things I ""heard"""...... Scouts sent home for vulgar language.... Entire Troop quarantined for a flu outbreak... AT&T VIPs given priority on the Big Zip....Certain glow in the dark patches are radioactive and will give you cancer (and are thus more desirable)....bunch of Scouts sent home for showing porn on their schmart phones in the shower house.... a certain political candidate predicted that the Jambo was going to be used for Emergency Mass Evacuation training....there is no poison ivy in West Virginia....there is a 60% chance of rain this afternoon (bright sunshine ).... Look at that radar, the lightning is going to the north of us..... they are going to combine the Pet Care and Cooking merit badges...
It was widely know that at AP Hill there was a parallel training and logistics agenda for the army to setup and support a civilian city of 60,000.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×