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fred johnson

Is today's scouting too prissy?

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I've seen groups of women scrubbing the village's clothes in a river in the third world who backbite and gossip less than some of the people on this thread.

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I've seen groups of women scrubbing the village's clothes in a river in the third world who backbite and gossip less than some of the people on this thread.
Aside from that old 'pot and kettle' thing, I am quite familiar with some third world places. If you remove that backbreaking aspect of life and give them the spare time, they too amuse themselves with gossip and backbiting. I personally observe that as well. People are pretty much the same everywhere. Some just have more freedom to be themselves.

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Related to this discussion, I have noticed that the adults joining the program with younger guys have significantly less experience in outdoor skills. Is this something that others have seen as well?
Is there any connection between the end of mandatory military conscription (1973) and the decline in outdoor skills? When I was young, my buddies and I had dads, uncles, and brothers in the military and even though I was not of draft age in 73, I grew up in the cultural context that military service was a real possibility. Part of the motivation in learning our outdoor skills as kids was that was what soldiers did. The dads that are in scouting and a bit younger than me grew up in a different climate.

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Related to this discussion, I have noticed that the adults joining the program with younger guys have significantly less experience in outdoor skills. Is this something that others have seen as well?
Interesting idea. I am color blind so military service was not really an option for me. Also makes trail markers difficult, and faded ones near impossible.

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Today' date=' video games and computers are such a massive world of adventure to explore, the scouts simply have nothing to offer to compete. Call of Duty is more interesting than scouting. It's better. It isn't real, which is a problem (is it?), but it is more fun for most kids.[/quote']

 

Many parents are happy to let their kids stay inside and play video games then they don't have to worry about them getting kidnapped while walking to the corner store or hit by a car while riding their bikes or molested while on an outing with a youth group, etc.

JBlake: you remind me of Oscar in Robert Heinlein's 'Glory Road'. That's a good thing.

 

"I let him live..."

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This thread has irritated me since it started, there has been a lot of guessing about why scouts is becoming prissy and I have two points on the matter:

 

1) MONEY!! Your council and national want dues $; to do that they need to increase membership and retain already enrolled members. That means they are recruiting and keeping kids that don't want squat to do with the outdoors.

 

2) MANLY??? Seriously???? We are a “prissy†troop according to the local Scouters. Some of our boys even shave their legs, its a great joke while on an outing to see how has smoother legs, them or me (there are times with they have won!)

 

Our “prissy†troop did a 30 mile backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon in March, but that wasn't considered “manly†because we didn't go 50 miles. Our “prissy†troop is having their 50 miler in July, but it isn't manly either because we are canoeing, not backpacking. The boys in our “prissy†troop who shave their legs are either on the swim team or cyclist; one pair and their father even complete all 410 miles of the GOBA (Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure) every summer. Our “prissy†boys can cook their own meals and don't need mommy to do it for them. And yes, we are fastidious about uniforming!

 

So what do the “manly†troops in our area do??? They attend summer camp and Fall Camp O'ree; occasionally Klondike, but outside of that, not much. When they camp they show up with ATV's so their boys won't actually have to walk anywhere; they can't run a camp stove, dutch oven, or cook over an open flame; and I kid you not, I've seen Scout Masters show up at Camp O'ree with boxes of Pizza for dinner because cooking is women work. Two years ago my mom fined one of the “manly†troops $17,000 for destruction of property and failure to comply with park rules and regulations while camping at a CORP of Engineers property. These guys show up with shirts unbuttoned, tails untucked, and basically look like crap.

 

I think we need to redefine “manly.†There is no reason your Scout Uniform shouldn't be given the same care as a military uniform. Failure to comply with local, state, or federal rules and regulations is never "manly;" At best its ignorant, but more likely its just belligerent!

Khaliela: I can't find your point. In either post. Too many tangents.

Is it worth you trying again?

 

Thanks.

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Related to this discussion, I have noticed that the adults joining the program with younger guys have significantly less experience in outdoor skills. Is this something that others have seen as well?
We have one pack overnighter a year and it is close to our home. Many families just come out for the day and don't stay overnight because the parents don't like camping. I often ask myself why they signed their boy up for scouting if they don't like camping themselves.

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Unauthorized and Restricted Activities The following activities have been declared unauthorized and restricted by the Boy Scouts of America:

  1. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are banned from program use. The exception is council-approved ATV programs. They are not approved for unit use. ATVs are defined as motorized recreational cycles with three or four large, soft tires, designed for off-road use on a variety of terrains.
  2. Boxing, karate, and related martial artsâ€â€except judo, aikido, and Tai Chiâ€â€are not authorized activities.
  3. Chainsaws and mechanical log splitters may be authorized for use only by trained individuals over the age of 18, using proper protective gear in accordance with local laws.
  4. Exploration of abandoned mines is an unauthorized activity.
  5. Varsity football teams and interscholastic or club football competition and activities are unauthorized activities.
  6. Fireworks secured, used, or displayed in conjunction with program and activities is unauthorized except where the fireworks display is conducted under the auspices of a certified or licensed fireworks control expert.
  7. The selling of fireworks as a fund-raising or moneyearning activity by any group acting for or on behalf of members, units, or districts may not be authorized by councils.
  8. Flying in hang gliders, ultralights, experimental aircraft, or hot-air balloons (nontethered); parachuting; and flying in aircraft as part of a search and rescue mission are unauthorized activities. Tethered hot-air balloon flights are authorized, and a flying plan must be submitted.
  9. Motorized go-carts and motorbike activities are unauthorized for Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs. Go-carting conducted at a commercial facility that provides equipment and supervision of cart operation is authorized upon submittal of a completed tour and activity plan. Participating in motorized speed events, including motorcycles, boats, drag racing, demolition derbies, and related events are not authorized activities for any program level.
  10. Participation in amateur or professional rodeo events and council or district sponsorship of rodeos are not authorized.
  11. Pointing any type of firearm or simulated firearm at any individual is unauthorized. Scout units may plan or participate in paintball, laser tag or similar events where participants shoot at targets that are neither living nor human representations. Units with council approval may participate in formally organized historical reenactment events, where firearms are used and intentionally aimed over the heads of the reenactment participants. The use of paintball guns, laser guns or similar devices may be utilized in target shooting events with council approval and following the Sweet 16 of BSA Safety. Council approval means the approval of the Scout Executive or his designee on a tour permit specifically outlining details of the event. (However, law enforcement departments and agencies using firearms in standard officer/agent training may use their training agenda when accompanied with appropriate safety equipment in the Law Enforcement Exploring program.)
  12. Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of the program curriculum.
    (The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips. However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures are followed and that all participants have obtained necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or federal agencies. While hunter safety education might not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license, successful completion of the respective state voluntary program is required before participating in the activity.)
  13. Motorized personal watercraft (PWC), such as Jet-Skis®, are not authorized for use in Scouting aquatics, and their use should not be permitted in or near BSA program areas. The exception is council-approved PWC programs. They are not approved for unit use.
  14. Except for (1) law enforcement officers required to carry firearms within their jurisdiction, and (2) circumstances within the scope of the BSA hunting policy statement, firearms should not be in the possession of any person engaged in camping, hiking, backpacking, or any other Scouting activity other than those specifically planned for target shooting under the supervision of a certified firearms instructor. (Among the purposes of this policy is to prohibit adult leaders from bringing firearms on BSA camping and hiking activities or to unit meetings.)
  15. Parasailing, or any activity in which a person is carried aloft by a parachute, parasail, kite, or other device towed by a motorboat, including a tube, or by any other means, is unauthorized.
  16. All activities related to bungee cord jumping (sometimes called shock cord jumping) are unauthorized.
  17. Technical tree-climbing with ropes or harnesses is not authorized as an activity.
  18. Water chugging and related activities are not authorized for any program level.

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Unauthorized and Restricted Activities The following activities have been declared unauthorized and restricted by the Boy Scouts of America:

  1. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are banned from program use. The exception is council-approved ATV programs. They are not approved for unit use. ATVs are defined as motorized recreational cycles with three or four large, soft tires, designed for off-road use on a variety of terrains.
  2. Boxing, karate, and related martial artsâ€â€except judo, aikido, and Tai Chiâ€â€are not authorized activities.
  3. Chainsaws and mechanical log splitters may be authorized for use only by trained individuals over the age of 18, using proper protective gear in accordance with local laws.
  4. Exploration of abandoned mines is an unauthorized activity.
  5. Varsity football teams and interscholastic or club football competition and activities are unauthorized activities.
  6. Fireworks secured, used, or displayed in conjunction with program and activities is unauthorized except where the fireworks display is conducted under the auspices of a certified or licensed fireworks control expert.
  7. The selling of fireworks as a fund-raising or moneyearning activity by any group acting for or on behalf of members, units, or districts may not be authorized by councils.
  8. Flying in hang gliders, ultralights, experimental aircraft, or hot-air balloons (nontethered); parachuting; and flying in aircraft as part of a search and rescue mission are unauthorized activities. Tethered hot-air balloon flights are authorized, and a flying plan must be submitted.
  9. Motorized go-carts and motorbike activities are unauthorized for Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs. Go-carting conducted at a commercial facility that provides equipment and supervision of cart operation is authorized upon submittal of a completed tour and activity plan. Participating in motorized speed events, including motorcycles, boats, drag racing, demolition derbies, and related events are not authorized activities for any program level.
  10. Participation in amateur or professional rodeo events and council or district sponsorship of rodeos are not authorized.
  11. Pointing any type of firearm or simulated firearm at any individual is unauthorized. Scout units may plan or participate in paintball, laser tag or similar events where participants shoot at targets that are neither living nor human representations. Units with council approval may participate in formally organized historical reenactment events, where firearms are used and intentionally aimed over the heads of the reenactment participants. The use of paintball guns, laser guns or similar devices may be utilized in target shooting events with council approval and following the Sweet 16 of BSA Safety. Council approval means the approval of the Scout Executive or his designee on a tour permit specifically outlining details of the event. (However, law enforcement departments and agencies using firearms in standard officer/agent training may use their training agenda when accompanied with appropriate safety equipment in the Law Enforcement Exploring program.)
  12. Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of the program curriculum.
    (The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips. However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures are followed and that all participants have obtained necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or federal agencies. While hunter safety education might not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license, successful completion of the respective state voluntary program is required before participating in the activity.)
  13. Motorized personal watercraft (PWC), such as Jet-Skis®, are not authorized for use in Scouting aquatics, and their use should not be permitted in or near BSA program areas. The exception is council-approved PWC programs. They are not approved for unit use.
  14. Except for (1) law enforcement officers required to carry firearms within their jurisdiction, and (2) circumstances within the scope of the BSA hunting policy statement, firearms should not be in the possession of any person engaged in camping, hiking, backpacking, or any other Scouting activity other than those specifically planned for target shooting under the supervision of a certified firearms instructor. (Among the purposes of this policy is to prohibit adult leaders from bringing firearms on BSA camping and hiking activities or to unit meetings.)
  15. Parasailing, or any activity in which a person is carried aloft by a parachute, parasail, kite, or other device towed by a motorboat, including a tube, or by any other means, is unauthorized.
  16. All activities related to bungee cord jumping (sometimes called shock cord jumping) are unauthorized.
  17. Technical tree-climbing with ropes or harnesses is not authorized as an activity.
  18. Water chugging and related activities are not authorized for any program level.

Some of these I can understand, but some of these are just silly. Scouts can't even play laser tag (#11). Guess our council hasn't gotten wind of the unit in our area selling fireworks yet (#7). I bet it is a great money-maker for them.

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Unauthorized and Restricted Activities The following activities have been declared unauthorized and restricted by the Boy Scouts of America:

  1. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are banned from program use. The exception is council-approved ATV programs. They are not approved for unit use. ATVs are defined as motorized recreational cycles with three or four large, soft tires, designed for off-road use on a variety of terrains.
  2. Boxing, karate, and related martial artsâ€â€except judo, aikido, and Tai Chiâ€â€are not authorized activities.
  3. Chainsaws and mechanical log splitters may be authorized for use only by trained individuals over the age of 18, using proper protective gear in accordance with local laws.
  4. Exploration of abandoned mines is an unauthorized activity.
  5. Varsity football teams and interscholastic or club football competition and activities are unauthorized activities.
  6. Fireworks secured, used, or displayed in conjunction with program and activities is unauthorized except where the fireworks display is conducted under the auspices of a certified or licensed fireworks control expert.
  7. The selling of fireworks as a fund-raising or moneyearning activity by any group acting for or on behalf of members, units, or districts may not be authorized by councils.
  8. Flying in hang gliders, ultralights, experimental aircraft, or hot-air balloons (nontethered); parachuting; and flying in aircraft as part of a search and rescue mission are unauthorized activities. Tethered hot-air balloon flights are authorized, and a flying plan must be submitted.
  9. Motorized go-carts and motorbike activities are unauthorized for Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs. Go-carting conducted at a commercial facility that provides equipment and supervision of cart operation is authorized upon submittal of a completed tour and activity plan. Participating in motorized speed events, including motorcycles, boats, drag racing, demolition derbies, and related events are not authorized activities for any program level.
  10. Participation in amateur or professional rodeo events and council or district sponsorship of rodeos are not authorized.
  11. Pointing any type of firearm or simulated firearm at any individual is unauthorized. Scout units may plan or participate in paintball, laser tag or similar events where participants shoot at targets that are neither living nor human representations. Units with council approval may participate in formally organized historical reenactment events, where firearms are used and intentionally aimed over the heads of the reenactment participants. The use of paintball guns, laser guns or similar devices may be utilized in target shooting events with council approval and following the Sweet 16 of BSA Safety. Council approval means the approval of the Scout Executive or his designee on a tour permit specifically outlining details of the event. (However, law enforcement departments and agencies using firearms in standard officer/agent training may use their training agenda when accompanied with appropriate safety equipment in the Law Enforcement Exploring program.)
  12. Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of the program curriculum.
    (The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips. However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures are followed and that all participants have obtained necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or federal agencies. While hunter safety education might not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license, successful completion of the respective state voluntary program is required before participating in the activity.)
  13. Motorized personal watercraft (PWC), such as Jet-Skis®, are not authorized for use in Scouting aquatics, and their use should not be permitted in or near BSA program areas. The exception is council-approved PWC programs. They are not approved for unit use.
  14. Except for (1) law enforcement officers required to carry firearms within their jurisdiction, and (2) circumstances within the scope of the BSA hunting policy statement, firearms should not be in the possession of any person engaged in camping, hiking, backpacking, or any other Scouting activity other than those specifically planned for target shooting under the supervision of a certified firearms instructor. (Among the purposes of this policy is to prohibit adult leaders from bringing firearms on BSA camping and hiking activities or to unit meetings.)
  15. Parasailing, or any activity in which a person is carried aloft by a parachute, parasail, kite, or other device towed by a motorboat, including a tube, or by any other means, is unauthorized.
  16. All activities related to bungee cord jumping (sometimes called shock cord jumping) are unauthorized.
  17. Technical tree-climbing with ropes or harnesses is not authorized as an activity.
  18. Water chugging and related activities are not authorized for any program level.

Pointing any type of firearm or simulated firearm at any individual of human likeness is against the rules in order to reduce accidents and encourage the development of a safety mindset, sort of like 'always assume that a gun is loaded'. Gun violence involving children is a national crisis. In 2010, 496 American military personnel were killed in Afghanistan. That is a tragic figure and a costly sacrifice. In the same year, 606 people in the US were killed in unintentional shootings and 15,576 children in the US were injured by firearms. Pretty much every Scouter that I know would take a bullet to protect his/her scouts from an attacker. BSA is uniquely positioned to influence gun safety among the nations youth and should be doing much more to change these statistics in the future.

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Related to this discussion, I have noticed that the adults joining the program with younger guys have significantly less experience in outdoor skills. Is this something that others have seen as well?
dedkad, why are they staying away? Intimidated, too busy, program not attractive to them? As a unit leader, there is only so much you can do.

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This thread has irritated me since it started, there has been a lot of guessing about why scouts is becoming prissy and I have two points on the matter:

 

1) MONEY!! Your council and national want dues $; to do that they need to increase membership and retain already enrolled members. That means they are recruiting and keeping kids that don't want squat to do with the outdoors.

 

2) MANLY??? Seriously???? We are a “prissy†troop according to the local Scouters. Some of our boys even shave their legs, its a great joke while on an outing to see how has smoother legs, them or me (there are times with they have won!)

 

Our “prissy†troop did a 30 mile backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon in March, but that wasn't considered “manly†because we didn't go 50 miles. Our “prissy†troop is having their 50 miler in July, but it isn't manly either because we are canoeing, not backpacking. The boys in our “prissy†troop who shave their legs are either on the swim team or cyclist; one pair and their father even complete all 410 miles of the GOBA (Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure) every summer. Our “prissy†boys can cook their own meals and don't need mommy to do it for them. And yes, we are fastidious about uniforming!

 

So what do the “manly†troops in our area do??? They attend summer camp and Fall Camp O'ree; occasionally Klondike, but outside of that, not much. When they camp they show up with ATV's so their boys won't actually have to walk anywhere; they can't run a camp stove, dutch oven, or cook over an open flame; and I kid you not, I've seen Scout Masters show up at Camp O'ree with boxes of Pizza for dinner because cooking is women work. Two years ago my mom fined one of the “manly†troops $17,000 for destruction of property and failure to comply with park rules and regulations while camping at a CORP of Engineers property. These guys show up with shirts unbuttoned, tails untucked, and basically look like crap.

 

I think we need to redefine “manly.†There is no reason your Scout Uniform shouldn't be given the same care as a military uniform. Failure to comply with local, state, or federal rules and regulations is never "manly;" At best its ignorant, but more likely its just belligerent!

So your TROOP did a 30 mile backpacking trip....How many were on the trip????? 20-30???? Have your read anything about back country ethics????

 

Overwhelming local resource and trails isn't something to be proud of......and very honestly you should never take a group more than 10 into most back country areas.

 

Of course most know it all SM's don't do the due care......I am SCOUTMASTER, I am taking the boy into the woods, 30 folks at a campsite big enough for 10 is ok....We overwhelm the water resource, by our shear numbers damage the trail system and cheat others of the remote wilderness experience.

 

 

Far as pizza at camporee's......I don't see anything wrong with it.......I did pizza night at summer camp because the PLC asked me to....

 

Remember it is the boys decision not yours.

 

 

Khaliela....your troop seems very adult led.

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This thread has irritated me since it started, there has been a lot of guessing about why scouts is becoming prissy and I have two points on the matter:

 

1) MONEY!! Your council and national want dues $; to do that they need to increase membership and retain already enrolled members. That means they are recruiting and keeping kids that don't want squat to do with the outdoors.

 

2) MANLY??? Seriously???? We are a “prissy†troop according to the local Scouters. Some of our boys even shave their legs, its a great joke while on an outing to see how has smoother legs, them or me (there are times with they have won!)

 

Our “prissy†troop did a 30 mile backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon in March, but that wasn't considered “manly†because we didn't go 50 miles. Our “prissy†troop is having their 50 miler in July, but it isn't manly either because we are canoeing, not backpacking. The boys in our “prissy†troop who shave their legs are either on the swim team or cyclist; one pair and their father even complete all 410 miles of the GOBA (Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure) every summer. Our “prissy†boys can cook their own meals and don't need mommy to do it for them. And yes, we are fastidious about uniforming!

 

So what do the “manly†troops in our area do??? They attend summer camp and Fall Camp O'ree; occasionally Klondike, but outside of that, not much. When they camp they show up with ATV's so their boys won't actually have to walk anywhere; they can't run a camp stove, dutch oven, or cook over an open flame; and I kid you not, I've seen Scout Masters show up at Camp O'ree with boxes of Pizza for dinner because cooking is women work. Two years ago my mom fined one of the “manly†troops $17,000 for destruction of property and failure to comply with park rules and regulations while camping at a CORP of Engineers property. These guys show up with shirts unbuttoned, tails untucked, and basically look like crap.

 

I think we need to redefine “manly.†There is no reason your Scout Uniform shouldn't be given the same care as a military uniform. Failure to comply with local, state, or federal rules and regulations is never "manly;" At best its ignorant, but more likely its just belligerent!

Do you actually know what GOBA is???? You only ride 50 miles a day maybe....You load all of your gear into trucks to be hauled to the next campsite......You don't prepare your meals......and it is in the plains area of ohio so it is nice and flat.

 

So don't make it into a more than it is.....

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Unauthorized and Restricted Activities The following activities have been declared unauthorized and restricted by the Boy Scouts of America:

  1. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are banned from program use. The exception is council-approved ATV programs. They are not approved for unit use. ATVs are defined as motorized recreational cycles with three or four large, soft tires, designed for off-road use on a variety of terrains.
  2. Boxing, karate, and related martial artsâ€â€except judo, aikido, and Tai Chiâ€â€are not authorized activities.
  3. Chainsaws and mechanical log splitters may be authorized for use only by trained individuals over the age of 18, using proper protective gear in accordance with local laws.
  4. Exploration of abandoned mines is an unauthorized activity.
  5. Varsity football teams and interscholastic or club football competition and activities are unauthorized activities.
  6. Fireworks secured, used, or displayed in conjunction with program and activities is unauthorized except where the fireworks display is conducted under the auspices of a certified or licensed fireworks control expert.
  7. The selling of fireworks as a fund-raising or moneyearning activity by any group acting for or on behalf of members, units, or districts may not be authorized by councils.
  8. Flying in hang gliders, ultralights, experimental aircraft, or hot-air balloons (nontethered); parachuting; and flying in aircraft as part of a search and rescue mission are unauthorized activities. Tethered hot-air balloon flights are authorized, and a flying plan must be submitted.
  9. Motorized go-carts and motorbike activities are unauthorized for Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs. Go-carting conducted at a commercial facility that provides equipment and supervision of cart operation is authorized upon submittal of a completed tour and activity plan. Participating in motorized speed events, including motorcycles, boats, drag racing, demolition derbies, and related events are not authorized activities for any program level.
  10. Participation in amateur or professional rodeo events and council or district sponsorship of rodeos are not authorized.
  11. Pointing any type of firearm or simulated firearm at any individual is unauthorized. Scout units may plan or participate in paintball, laser tag or similar events where participants shoot at targets that are neither living nor human representations. Units with council approval may participate in formally organized historical reenactment events, where firearms are used and intentionally aimed over the heads of the reenactment participants. The use of paintball guns, laser guns or similar devices may be utilized in target shooting events with council approval and following the Sweet 16 of BSA Safety. Council approval means the approval of the Scout Executive or his designee on a tour permit specifically outlining details of the event. (However, law enforcement departments and agencies using firearms in standard officer/agent training may use their training agenda when accompanied with appropriate safety equipment in the Law Enforcement Exploring program.)
  12. Hunting is not an authorized Cub Scout or Boy Scout activity, although hunting safety is part of the program curriculum.
    (The purpose of this policy is to restrict chartered packs, troops, and teams from conducting hunting trips. However, this policy does not restrict Venturing crews from conducting hunting trips or special adult hunting expeditions provided that adequate safety procedures are followed and that all participants have obtained necessary permits and/or licenses from either state or federal agencies. While hunter safety education might not be required prior to obtaining a hunting license, successful completion of the respective state voluntary program is required before participating in the activity.)
  13. Motorized personal watercraft (PWC), such as Jet-Skis®, are not authorized for use in Scouting aquatics, and their use should not be permitted in or near BSA program areas. The exception is council-approved PWC programs. They are not approved for unit use.
  14. Except for (1) law enforcement officers required to carry firearms within their jurisdiction, and (2) circumstances within the scope of the BSA hunting policy statement, firearms should not be in the possession of any person engaged in camping, hiking, backpacking, or any other Scouting activity other than those specifically planned for target shooting under the supervision of a certified firearms instructor. (Among the purposes of this policy is to prohibit adult leaders from bringing firearms on BSA camping and hiking activities or to unit meetings.)
  15. Parasailing, or any activity in which a person is carried aloft by a parachute, parasail, kite, or other device towed by a motorboat, including a tube, or by any other means, is unauthorized.
  16. All activities related to bungee cord jumping (sometimes called shock cord jumping) are unauthorized.
  17. Technical tree-climbing with ropes or harnesses is not authorized as an activity.
  18. Water chugging and related activities are not authorized for any program level.

Uuuuhhhh, what is water chugging?

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packsaddle - water chugging is a contest to see who can drink the most water in a period of time. It sounds harmless, but there is a slight risk of "Water intoxication, also known as water poisoning or dilutional hyponatremia, is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain functions that results when the normal balance of electrolytes in the body is pushed outside safe limits by over-hydration." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication

 

There are a couple of cases per year that I hear about, and I can see this being something that could happen at summer camp in the heat if you aren't careful. I could see a hydration game getting out of control.

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