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MichScouter

Do most packs give there webelos 2 a parting gift before they crossover into a troop?

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The pack merely handed them to the troop. The troop gave them a handbook and a neckerchief as they arrived at the other side of the bridge.
Same here, Don't let the door hit your.....

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Our pack presents AoL recipients with I guess what could be considered as a “career” plaque. On the arrow has colored thread. Each color represents the ranks they earned while in cub scouts. 

Each plaque is $60 plus the cost of shipping. 

 

We we have been using this particular company for 10 years. 

B8172970-42C5-48B9-983F-274A3163CFF8.jpeg

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On 2/6/2013 at 2:12 PM, MichScouter said:

If so what do you give? 

A hearty handshake and best wishes for the future.

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When I was Webelos Den Leader, I might sometimes have sent the boys along to Boy Scouts with some trinket of affection by which they could remember their time in Cubs - a hand-crafted woggle, a wood-burned plaque, something simple. But the most important thing I could give to those boys was a deep and lasting understanding of the patrol method, along with solid preparation for their next adventure in Boy Scouts. When my boys were able to advance to the rank of Scout in their first or second meeting thanks to the learning they received in Webelos, I knew I had done my job right. That preparation was worth far more than any display, award, or gift could ever have been.

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Posted (edited)

my den with my son, no outgoing gifts

 

The pack that feeds into my troop (different then my son's), does handbooks.  But this year they learned to give them to the scouts at the first troop meeting.  Some never made it to the first meeting and what a waste of a book.

Edited by scotteg83

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Our pack supplied the AOL plaque and arrow along with cake and ice cream for after the ceremony.   The troop gives each scout crossing over a new scout handbook, bolo and troop number badge.

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As long as the cub program is these days, leaving the pack and joining a troop should be reward enough.  :)

For me, the AOL patch was the highlight.  As a bonus, Mr. Bates, my first SM, greeted me on the other side of the cross over bridge and and presented me with an official yellow neckerchief.  Forty plus years later, I still have it.

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My favorite items collected throughout my youth Scouting career are badges. I have plaques, certificates, various miscellaneous items, but the things that mean the most to me are the badges; rank, event patches, awards, mile swim, etc. Even the cub stuff, there isn't as much in that part of my collection, but the badges still mean the most.

This sounds terrible, but the plaques are almost an annoyance. I appreciate being given them, where they came from, that people took the time to purchase or make them, etc. But they're these bulky items, and as big as some of them are, the little badges still hold the most meaning for me.

My point is that I think the AoL badge will likely always mean the most to a scout. That's not to say "don't do a gift", just that the emphasis on a gift to mark the occasion might be overlooking the fact that the badge itself can (and should) be the most significant marker of that accomplishment and occasion for the scout receiving it.

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Posted (edited)

There is a definite trend over the last couple decades, call it "over-recognition" for lack of a better phrase.

We have milestones in life.  Meaningful ones.  But we need a brass band every time we achieve something?

Example:  my wife was a kindergarten teacher.  We went round and round on the "need" for a graduation ceremony for kindergarteners.  My position is "What are they graduating from?" 

The over-recognition trend has hit the BSA too.  Many of these mementos and ceremonies primarily meet the parents' needs and wishes.  I think the scouts would be satisfied with things that are simple and meaningful. 

 

 

Edited by desertrat77

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53 minutes ago, FireStone said:

This sounds terrible, but the plaques are almost an annoyance. I appreciate being given them, where they came from, that people took the time to purchase or make them, etc. But they're these bulky items, and as big as some of them are, the little badges still hold the most meaning for me.

Yeah, some of these examples seem larger and bulkier than what I received for my eagle rank.

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In the pack I came out of, We got an AOL patch, mom's pin, and the OA chief congratulated us and shook our hands. First time I encountered the OA and boy did it make an impression.

My sons' pack gave the patch, mom's pin, and plaques.It seems as if each year the leaders are trying to outdo the previous years. My youngest has a huge plaque! Hate to see how much it was.

 

3 hours ago, scotteg83 said:

The pack that feeds into my troop (different then my son's), does handbooks.  But this year they learned to give them to the scouts at the first troop meeting.  Some never made it to the first meeting and what a waste of a book.

Sadly that happened with my old troop, except it was custom neckers. Gave out nine of them one year. Some never made it to the first meeting, and others quit within months. The troop decided to go old school and invest them with the neckerchief and slide when they earned Scout rank. It has saved some $. One year 2/3 never showed up to the first meeting. This past year, out of 4 that were suppose to be crossing over, only 1 came to the first meeting afterwards. 2 decided to join other troops, and 1 is MIA.

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The pack didn't do much of anything in the past.  Someone finally decided to do the arrow similar to Eagle87's pic above without the plaque.  Its simple, cheap and we just used various bits and electrical tape.  Presenting the arrow and describing what the individual colors represented added some flair so family members understood what it all meant.  My son is a 14yo Life scout and his arrow still hangs in his room.  I would assume that eventually that arrow will be delegated to a cardboard box in the basement until he's an adult and wants to see it again.  Personally, I think its important to keep in mind that a gift of some sort will mean something different to each scout and family.  I think its safe to assume that many of the webelow arrows have unfortunately been tossed in the trash.  Others will cherish them forever.  I've witnessed Eagle Scouts purge almost everything scout related that they owned (except patches, never patches) as if they had just quit a job.  So I would say any gift should be of moderate value.

The troop provides a necker and book upon crossing over. 

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Our Den Leader makes some sort of award like Eagle87 posted above, but its different each year since each den leader adds his own spin to it.(The pack provides a budge for the items, anything more the den leader take on himself, but typically its within budget). The pack also gives each scout a flash light in a 'lighting the way' ceremony when they Bridge. The receiving troop typically gives them epaulets and a book when they cross over.

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