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Sentinel947

Scouts is Uncool

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My sons responce to a baseball player who said scouting is for wimps this weekend:

"Let see you had your parents drive you to a game and then you went out to eat later right? I rode my bike 8 miles to a gun range set up camp shot 200 rounds of .22 rifle and made my own dinner"

 

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

 

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

Our troop encourages facebook and socail media except when camping and during meetings. Otherwise facebook is mandatory for troop communication. Boys need to be fluent in technology to integrate into college and the workforce.

Its a tool ust like a pocket knife a rifle or a 2M radio. and the kids ned to have the skills to use that tool effectively.

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

Facebook is in the business of using your information to make a profit. Given their past history I would not trust them with confidential information regarding minors. Our district highly discourages Facebook as a means of troop communication.

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

Given that facebook has T&Cs that limit accounts to those over 13 years of age, how do you use it for troop communications? Just with the parents and older scouts?

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

Zing dc !

 

A scout is trustworthy, obedient. Certainly your troop is not mandating that the scout violate the Scout Oath by violating the T&C of Facebook.

 

I don't think the youth needs years of experience with Facebook in order to succeed in the workforce and college. They will have it down pat after a couple of weeks. Twitter is not rocket science either. There is plenty of time for that. Facebook may not even exist by the time they go to college. MySpace anyone ?

 

They do need to know effective communication skills. Reading, writing, speaking. Things Facebook and Twitter do nothing to foster.

 

I know I have given you a hard time on a few posts but you occasionally take a very hard line on issues that really seem to fly in the face of what Scouting is all about. I hope you stick around and give me a hard time when I say something equally as outrageous. :)

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.....Over the years I have had a fairly substantial number of scouts that always have a book, or sometimes more than one, with them on outings and at summer camp. On occasion, they have had to be asked to please put it away while we did an activity; and it is rather nice to see a boy leaning on a tree in the woods reading. What has often been the case in that regard in the families is that TV was either not allowed (in a few cases) or drastically monitored; same with computer related things as the age has developed. Most did not have phones until high school, and they were very limited plans, meant for real needed use only. While they all relished visiting other kids without those limitations (the overheard grapevine), they mostly were more polite, better at things in general because they actually read instructions and the book maybe, and did well in school. Many also were involved in sports, though they tended towards the more singular type such as track or wrestling.

......

I do now have a bit of a problem with the video games and so on becoming a distraction, even when they are not actually there. A few scouts cannot talk about anything else it seems, if not given a specific challenge or goal. They will generally not argue about going back to the task at hand, though they need to be monitored closely, which is the PL and SPL biggest challenges now.

......

 

I'm just going back and reading, or re-reading this thread.

You brought up several varied points in your post, but some really make me think....

 

I would so much rather see a boy leaning against a tree reading, than playing with technology..... but what I see more of is a boy or boys huddled up in a tent with a video game, with other cubs that didn't bring their games or tablet computers huddled around watching and wanting a turn. Our CM's sons are the ones with all of the latest gadgets, and it's usually around their tent where you find this huddle. On a campout, I view this tech as a sort of cancer. On a camp out last year, I had my son leave his tech at home. Unfortunately, other boys had theirs. I asked my son to go climb a tree or something, but it's hard when he wants to be right in the huddle!

I wish I could drive a removal of that cancer from our pack, but as mentioned, our CM, as well as other leaders, are the tech crowd and I think view the tech as a way of getting the boys out of their hair so they can burry themselves in their own smartphones.

 

Your point about TV on the home front is interesting. I was raised without much limit on TV. I have always contented that a kid can learn from TV, even stupid fiction. I feel that I was able to put myself in the situations of the story line and learn from it...... Situations that I may not otherwise find myself in..... shows like Andy Griffith, Brady Bunch, Munsters, Beaver, Lucy, etc.... usually had some sort of moral or social lesson

I think even the newer ones that my kids watch now that aren't nearly as "wholesome", can be educational to a degree.

Still, I do agree with your point that generally speaking kids with stricter limits tend to be more polite and socially well adjusted.

My wife and I limit our kids with TV & tech, but MAYBE not nearly enough.... I'll have to give this some thought for sure.

 

There isn't really any other way to put this, stout: What a goofy logic. There's one person in ~The Workforce~ that needs to know how to use Facebook on the job: The online marketing guy. Everyone else is slacking off. Facebook doesn't promote technology literacy, you don't need to know anything technical to use it.

In the troop setting, as DC pointed out, your troop must either be leaving your 10-12-yr-old scouts out in the cold, or encouraging them to break rules--neither is acceptable.

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Scouter99

Yes your are right noone needs to know how to incorporate JSON XML data from Facebook other than the marketing guy.

We teach kids how to use firearms but we don't expect them to know how to build one

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Scouter99

Yes your are right noone needs to know how to incorporate JSON XML data from Facebook other than the marketing guy.

We teach kids how to use firearms but we don't expect them to know how to build one

No one "needs" Facebook period.

 

You appear to still defend requiring a Scout in your troop to violate the Scout Oath.

 

So stout what troop are you with ? Inquiring minds want to know.

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KDD Kids have to have acess to face book. That can be from a parent account.

I love how a thread about keeping scouting cool tuned into a Y kids with technology if a bad thing.

As you complaing on the internet that the internet is bad.

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KDD Kids have to have acess to face book. That can be from a parent account.

I love how a thread about keeping scouting cool tuned into a Y kids with technology if a bad thing.

As you complaing on the internet that the internet is bad.

I have not complained about the Internet. I stated no one "needs" to have Facebook. I stated kids do not need to communicate by using Facebook.

 

You stated kids "have to have access to Facebook". Why ?

 

I cite your post above as evidence why technology alone does not prepare children for effective communication in college or the workforce.

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KDD Kids have to have acess to face book. That can be from a parent account.

I love how a thread about keeping scouting cool tuned into a Y kids with technology if a bad thing.

As you complaing on the internet that the internet is bad.

Because gthat is our primary communication with the troop. Updates to meetings etc. It is our troop requirement. If you think the ability to use social media will not help in college or the workforce Well I cant help you there. Thats your opinion and you can have it.

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Instant communication is for those whose myopic planning routine doesn't allow for anything else. Scouts going to local events should be planning months in advance. Summer camp at least a year in advance and high adventure minimum of two years out to get reservations in on time. Last minute, throw together events are facilitated by social media, but it only proves how inefficient the unit is operating on a daily basis.

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Until we drop the school work and have a uniform that looks more like a BDU and less like a corporate-casual desk jockey, scouts will always be uncool.

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Until we drop the school work and have a uniform that looks more like a BDU and less like a corporate-casual desk jockey, scouts will always be uncool.
BDU?

That can carry a certain "uncool" image too. Think ROTC!

Those weren't exactly the "cool" kids when I was in school...... though, admittedly that was a long time ago!

...... but they were cool to themselves!

Like someone said here earlier...... cool is what the kids make it. If they are having fun, it'll be cool. No doubt!

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