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CA_Scouter

Questionable Fund Raiser

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A committee member approached me about a new type of fundraiser where a person could get a crew of scouts out to their private property for a 2 hour block of general labor, in exchange for a donation to the troop. ( trash hauling, yard maintenance, garage cleanups, etc ).

 

Another variation on this theme was to auction off an afternoon of a scout crew's time for the same sort of work.

 

For the record, I'm opposed to the idea. I don't want my scouts doing menial chores for private landowners, unless its for someone who is handicapped, elderly, cancer patient.. etc.. I also can't see the scouts eagerly attending such a 'fundraiser'... I'd like to keep this part of the Boy Scouts a 'FUNdraiser'.

 

Would appreciate your comments on this idea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Will this be a fund raiser stricly for the Troop?

Or will the donations go into the Scouts' accounts?

 

ASM59

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Our troop has done what you describe in your first paragraph, not just once, but on several occassions. The work, yard maintenance, is menial, yes. But it requires leadership, and organization before and during the activity. The troop is advised of the troop's finances beforehand and votes for one of a couple options as to how the money will be split between the troop and the boy's accounts. The individual we "worked for" could have hired a yard maintenance outfit for the same or less money, but he chose to approach the Scouts because he believes in Scouting.

 

I don't see anything wrong with this scenario ...

 

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From the BSA's Ten Guides to Money-Earning Projects:

"Even when sales are confined to parents and friends, will they get their moneys worth from any product they purchase, function they attend, or services they receive from your unit? Here again is the principle of value received a sale standing on its own merit - so that the recipients are not in any way subsidizing either Scouting of the member. Youth members must learn to pay their own way and to honestly earn the money to do it. You cannot permit anyone to capitalize on a Scouting connection or induce sympathy as a substitute for a worthy product or service."

 

and

 

"Is it reasonably certain that people who need work or business will not lose it as a result of your units plan? Your unit should neither sell nor offer services if by so doing it will damage someone livelihood. If possible check with the people who may be affected."

 

If the work crews are taking business away from other people who need the work, it ought to be reconsidered. In my neighborhood, this would conflict with several families whose kids earn their summer money doing this, as well as a few retired guys hiring out for yardwork.

 

The next question refers to the first quote- are the Scouts getting FAIR VALUE for their effort? That means not being ripped off OR getting over-paid. It is my experience that most Scout work crews work their tails off for what ends up to be a pittance for the man-hours involved.

 

 

Now- on the other hand, I'd see this as a GREAT service project for the people you mentioned- handicapped, elderly, etc.

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Many,many moons back. British Scouts had one week a year where they went from house to house (Yes these were kinder times!!) Asking if any one wanted "Bob a job?"

A Bob was a shilling or 12 pennies.Which became 5 pence when we changed to decimal currency, now about 9 cents.

Most people gave a lot more, but there were times when people made you work your tail off for that Bob.

Bob A Job week was a lot of fun, I have fond memories of drinking endless cups of tea with sweet little old Ladies.

Eamonn

http://histclo.hispeed.com/youth/youth/org/sco/country/eng/act/se-actfr.htm(This message has been edited by Eamonn)

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A Scout earns his own way.

 

In addition to troop money-earning events, I encourage our boys to individually find ways to fund their Scouting needs. Needs such as weekly dues, campout fees, uniform parts, camping gear. Budget part our their allowance. Do odd jobs around the neighborhood, mow lawns, rake leaves, clean out garages. I've hired boys to do work around my house.

 

There is nothing menial about manual labor. They do fair work and get paid a fair wage. They learn something about self-sufficiency. It's part of their personal growth.

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This has been a popular fundraising avenue for youth in our church, raising funds for mission trips. I have no problem with this.

 

For some reason, it did not translate well to our scouts. In addition to a pack, troop and crew, our CO (church) sponsors a scout scholarship fund that provides money for boys in our unit (as well as other units in our district) to attend summer camp who may not be able to otherwise afford it. One of the ideas the scholarship committee had was to basically set aside $10 per hour in 'camp bucks' for scouts doing work around the CO's facility (e.g., planting, weeding, mulching, housecleaning, etc.). This was opened up to all scouts in our unit regardless of financial situation. There were no takers...I still can't figure it out.

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FScouter: good call. Def'n of menial: "of or fit for servants, low, servile." Substitute the word "uninspiring" for menial in my earlier post. As to the guideline Madkins put up about being reasonably certain that the unit's activities will not damage someone's livelihood ... yeah, we're reasonable certain that no commercial provider of lawn and yard maintenance services was deprived by our activities. We're also certain, without the "reasonable" qualifier, that more than one troop member earned a not insignificant portion of his summer camp fee via this fundraiser.

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SR540Beaver- "Madkin, Fair value? Have you checked the price of Trails End popcorn lately?"

 

Sigh. Yeah. Do you REALLY want to hear my opinions of THAT here? ;)

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Other fundraisers I have seen; hanging "door hangers" for a pizza place or a church, of course the car wash, passing out coupons or prizes at a store's grand opening or sale, doing a trash patrol at the county fair. The most ill advised one was collecting soda cans and giving out a discount coupon for a ticket at a county fair. The neighboring district DE roped his district into that one for 14 days at the fair and had to seek our district's help to cover. I think the only pay was selling the cans collected.

 

The only concern I have about selling off to individuals the services of scouts is the YP issues.

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By the way, FrankJ, I was just trying to give CA_Scouter ammo to convince the committee to pass on the idea. I don't have anything against it myself as long as the basic guidelines are solid!

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about door hangers, If you have boys doing this make sure the door hanger isn't put into mailboxes. You can hang, tape, or tie them to the outside. If a carrier finds them inside the box they are required to bring them back to the office. The sponser on the flyer will be called by the Postmaster nothing without postage is suppose to go in a mailbox.Not that it's a bad idea for a fund raiser just a heads up if you do it.

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If we limited scouting fund raisers to things that did not interfer with any other person then we could never do anything. Grocery stores sell popcorn and candybars. Stores sell clothes so we couldn't have rummage sales. So that is a bunch of bunk.

But you must give value for what you recieve. I personally think that doing yard work is a good fund raiser. Especially if you target older people.

One thing to be sure of is file the paper work with your council that you are doing a fund raiser. It is required.

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