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fullquiver

adult leaders

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I was told by out Scoutmaster soon after my son crossed over that if I wanted a good scouting program for my son, get involved myself. I think this is very good advise...which leads to a few of questions concerning adult leaders.

 

How do you create interest with the parents to get involved?

 

How do you create excitement with the leaders about scouting?

 

What do you do to create comrodery with the adults leaders?

 

I think that a successful troop will have a good amount of adult leadership and want to work on building our adult leaders numbers.

 

Thanks,

 

Fullquiver

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How? You have so much fun that the parents feel they are missing out on something so they want to join to be part of the fun!

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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I may be saying the same thing as Ed, but in a word - enthusiasm! No matter what you are doing, a little enthusiasm will go a long way towards building cooperation and getting the job done. Add A LOT of enthusiasm, and you can build a great team that others want to become a part of. Just a spark of enthusiasm can set off a wildfire!

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I don't really have an answer to your question. But I wanted to add that I feal sorry for the parents that don't get involved, they have no idea what they are missing. My involvement is a little more limited that I would like. But with a 5 year old that has to tag along everywhere I go, it limits what you can do with Boy Scouts.

 

Like the others have said, make it look like so much fun that they don't want to miss out on it. Alos, listen carefully to learn what some of these parents are good at so that you can ask them to help with those areas. Maybe you can get them hooked that way.

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Offer to teach them a skill and make it fun. My son's troop does a fantastic open house program for webelos where the kids get a chance to do hands on stuff (put up a tent, build a fire, make dump cake, learn to tie a knot as part of a specific activity - not just for its own sake, etc.). The boys love it. I sure wish the adult leaders would do something like that for new parents too.

 

Now we all know there are plenty of positions where being able to start a fire with a damp stick and an inch of rotting string in sub-zero weather while blindfolded is irrelevant, but they may not know or believe that. Give 'em a skill and they might be more confident about their ability to contribute as leaders.

 

Aside from learning a new skill in a fun way it would be a great way to break the ice and introduce new parents to current leaders.

 

The boys aren't the only ones who may be worried about feeling like "outsiders" or "newbies". Existing leaders get to know each other pretty well and it can be hard for new parents to break into that circle. Whatever scout-related social network they had from Cubs has just been broken up by the transition to Boy Scouts, and now they might not know any of the other adults. For women, who tend to be the majority in Cub pack leadership but a distinct minority in troop leadership, this may especially be an issue - though not always of course.

 

Actively invite parents' participation, help them learn a new skill, and they'll feel more like they belong (just like with the boys, isn't it). Then maybe they'll get to understand the program better and in turn, be more willing to register as volunteers.

 

Lisa'bob

A good old bobwhite too!

 

 

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Thanks for all the replies. Lisabob I think you made some very good points. I was wondering if any troops had had adult specific events to help adults get involved. Here are some examples of some of the things I have heard about since I have been looking for ideas:

 

Adult planning campouts

 

One scoutmaster I talked with took his ASMs on a fishing trip every year, another to a hunting camp

 

Tring to plan a time when the leaders can go through training together (ie SMF or woodbadge)

 

These activities are not meant to exclude the boys, but to build stronger friendships and to get the leaders going in the same direction....

 

The SM I have talked with that done these activities all had large active troops.

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Great ideas!

 

I'm going to come up with a plan to implement in my Troop. I've got a new bunch of great Scouts and I want to get their parents involved (and in a uniform!).

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How do you create interest with the parents to get involved?

It's easy to get the parents interest with an exciting program. Everyone loves a good show. What you want is to get them active. For that, you need to start small. Ask parents to help out on a small level. Help plan this or work an hour at that. Remember, if they didn't volunteer (initially) so you don't want to try to put the whole program in their lap.

 

How do you create excitement with the leaders about scouting?

When I first came on board in my Pack, one of my DLs was presented to me as "difficult". She hardly steps up to volunteer and when she does, the CC had to constantly follow up to make sure it is done. From my perspective being a DL seems like a job to her. This year I started implementing and promoting things to enhance the program. Den Flags, Cubmaster awards to be given to dens for certain accomplishments, skits, songs, and ceremonies at Pack meetings (apparently pre-CM Jerry Pack meetings tended to be a bit dry). Well, this particular DL isn't necessarily the poster child for Scout Leadership but she now attends all committee meetings, takes a greater role in the program and gets excited about the program. And she isn't difficult at all. "Make it fun, they will come"

 

What do you do to create comrodery with the adults leaders?

I will chime in with others on this one. A leader night out has been successful in the units I have been in. The fishing trips are a great example but make sure the event is enticing to everyone. Go to a ballgame, or other event. District Dinners, while offically a scouting event often turn into a non-scouting event after all of the ruffles and flourishes are completed, depending on your district. We would often schedule our own pack dinner at a local resturant (mexican food, margaritas, and leaders in need of stress relief are a good combination!) You won't get every one to attend. And maybe the first one may have minimal attendance. But good times attract good crowds.(This message has been edited by Cubmaster Jerry)

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