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Karen_216

Roasting Marshmallows

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Cub Scouts not being allowed to cook outside would make Wolf Rank requirement 8e - "With an adult, help to plan, prepare, and cook an outdoor meal." very had to complete.

 

Perhaps the G2SS is referencing Non-adult supervised outdoor cooking? If not, then BSA needs to revisit either the Wolf Rank requirement or the G2SS needs to be tweaked for clarity on this point. At our council's Resident Camp Wolf/Bear/Webelos boys all cook outside (campsite cooking on Wedenesday evening is a highlight). One of the camp activities for Wolves and Bears is called "Akela's Kitchen" which is also about outdoor cooking.

 

That said - toasting marshmellows hardly seems like cooking, so I wouldn't see why a Cub Scout couldn't toast marshmellows.

 

YiS

Michelle

 

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Ok, the diagram says Tigers, Wolves and Bears can't cook outdoors, but Webelos can.

 

Actually, I was hoping to see a more detailed reference on what "outdoor cooking" means, exactly. Does that mean an open fire or a stove, or either? If the "cooking" involves putting a baggie of eggs into a pot of boiling water on a propane stove, is that still prohibited? Does "cooking" also mean that they can't help in the preparation (i.e. set up their own foil packs, if they are then put on the fire by an adult)?

 

Also, I think they could be a little more specific than "outdoor". So is it ok for cubs to cook over an open fire if it is in a fireplace inside a cabin or someone's house? It's not "outdoors", right?

 

In any case, we have let the boys roast marshmallows, with adult/parental supervision, and the ok of their parents.

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The G2SS states only webelos are allowed to cook. i don;'t consider this cooking but wanted to double check. We only have a few boys at a time roasting. I know one of the parent's is nervous becasue she seemed to think the pit was too large!! But we had no problems last year.(her boy is one of the running around type). we strickly enforce the campfire rules. We have very long sticks we used (several feet).

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Karen

you have misunderstood the topic I believe. There is nothing in the policies of the Guide to Safe Scouting that prohibits cubs from cooking.

 

In fact cub cooking is not in the G2SS at all really. It is in a separate document attached to the on-line G2SS called the "Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities"

 

in the opening paragraph the BSa says "Age and rank-appropriate guidelines have been developed based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity of Boy Scouts of America youth members."

 

These are program recommendations to help you as aleader choose activities best suited for the youth you lead at their level of age and development. These are not in and of themselves policies although some do have other policies attached to the activity.

 

As a den leader with well behaved cubs who could understand the need for appropriate behavior when weilding flaming marshmellows yo would be fine to do that.

 

Would I let a pack of cubs near a bonfire with sharp obects and flaming snacks? Not a chance. You need to look at each of these activities and at the abilities of the group you are leading and make good choices. The purpose of the Activity Guidelines is to aid you in that decision making.

 

BW

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You beat me to it BW ;) The online guide is just that a "guide".

 

"The BSA recognizes that youth in various parts of the country develop at different rates. These guidelines are designed to demonstrate the mainstream of youth capabilities.

 

For instance, Cub Scouts may be involved in winter camping in Alaska, where cold-weather activities are part of the culture. On the West Coast and Gulf Coast, surfing may be appropriate for Boy Scouts. In the Northeast, youth begin playing street and ice hockey at an early age.

 

Because of the varying development rates among youth, these activity guidelines are flexible and should not be perceived as requirements or rules. They address the mainstream of youth abilities while allowing for exceptions for Scouting units and groups based on the consideration and judgment of unit, district, and council committees and boards."

 

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Wow folks!! We are talking about "roasting marshmallows" here !

 

If you gotta be referencing the G2SS to decide if that's "safe" for boys Cub Scout age then you need to be seriously re-considering whether you yourself have the proper amount of maturity and judgement to be a Scouter.

 

I sound harsh, but there's no excuse for that question ! Your time would be 'better spent' (HAHA) analyzing the risks associated with working on the Bowling Beltloop.

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If you gotta be referencing the G2SS to decide if that's "safe" for boys Cub Scout age then you need to be seriously re-considering whether you yourself have the proper amount of maturity and judgement to be a Scouter.

I'm new to this forum but I have to chime in here. I'm seriously wondering the very same about your level of maturity and judgement. I'm hoping the OP isn't new to Scouts because you gave a very poor first impression, both of Scouts AND this forum. I certainly hope you treat your scouts, leaders, and parents with a bit more respect than you just showed someone you don't know, who came to this forum to ask a question, however stupid you think the question may be.

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There are many things open to interpretation.

Nessmuck, then why did you read it and respond? I guess you missed the lesson on if you cant' say something nice, say nothing at all. I certainly hope you are not a teacher as you would tell your students "that's a stupid question" and leave them running from the room crying. Probably your cubs too.

Many questions have been raised on this forum and I thought i was joining to get one on one mature dialog and a modicum of respect but you never can tell who's going to "lambast" you for making an inquiry.Sorry it wasn't up to your standard of appropriate questions.

BTY -- it was just not myself asking this but a whole PANEL of people asking was behind the question as it was raised in committee by a parent. I said I dont' consider this cooking and it's not dangerous. But look at it differently-- perhaps I have a pack of special needs children. You don't know.

I've encountered many people and situations in my life but never been made to feel as disrescted as you have done. CONGRATULATIONS on a mature response.

 

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Nessmuk made a great point. Common sense & good planning should be the staple. The G2SS is reference material, nothing more.

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Any valid, reasonable points Nessmuk may have kinda get lost in the condescenion of his words. Without tone of voice, body language and facial expression words are everything....and his were unkind, unfriendly and inconsiderate at the least (3 points of Scout law)

 

Asking questions is how we learn and move from being a green leader to a lifelong Scouter. When your question is met with such derisivness there is a certain "why bother" that can set in.

 

IMHO

 

YiS

Michelle

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