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OldGreyEagle

So, What would you do? or have done?

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I gotta agree with Mike. There is a good possibility the wallet never made it to the meeting. Did this Scout drive to the meeting? Did he look in the vehicle? Is it still on his dresser?

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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Yes, the wallet made it to the meeting. The Scout is the new Venture Patrol Leader, and he came early for training with the other new youth leaders. His parents are very strict, and he has to have the wallet (with his permit) in his possession at all times. I called all Scouts in his Patrol the day after, and asked if they may have accidently picked up the wallet, if so, call me (SM) and I'll return it to the Scout, problem resolved. No accusations were made, just general conversation about how important that the wallet be found. It's been 48 hours and no calls (I wasn't expecting any). The PLC meets next week. We'll discuss the situation and how it can be avoided in the future. Meeeanwhile, the adult leaders will be more proactive in its supervision of the meeting area.

 

Thanks,,,,

anderson

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Anderson, you have done everything that I would have done and I'm not sure what more you can do except keep asking. I'd also make it a point to be very observent as some people with loose morals tend to have loose lips and eventually spill the truth.

 

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Mike,

 

Thanks. I figured I've gone as far as possible. I'm usually hard on myself in these situations, but also don't want to drive it in the ground. Patience is the word. You're right about the loose lips sinks ships. I just hate it for the young man who lost his license, and was concerned that the inactive parents would blame the Troop. They didn't. They understood and placed the responsibility with their son. He's a good Scout, but I'm interested as to who doesn't show up at the next meeting.

 

Thanks again,

Anderson

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Back to the original problem about lights-out...

 

Bob White -- I loved your example of using the chain of command! You identified the problem, then brought it to the attention of the boy leadership chain. Part of leadership is setting the example and enforcing the rules. Of course it's easier for us to deal with the problem directly, but nobody learns anything and we will be the ones that continue to be required to step in. For problems other than safety, we should insist the chain of command deal with the situation (even if we sometimes hold the ultimate hammer, like your telephone calls).

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Just my 2 cents worth-

 

I don't like the idea of using clean up or latrine duty for punishiment - because it's hard enough to get the boys to willingly do these jobs anyway, without the stigma of them being "punishment" jobs.

 

I agree that a scout should do latrines when it is his turn, because it has to be done and as part of the community, everyone does their part. Today your part might be latrines - tomorrow, it might be cooking, or fire duty.

 

I do like the idea of getting the SPL and the PL in on quieting the boys - there's nothing better than peer pressure! (And why should I have to be out getting my feet damp and being bug eaten?)

 

however, we have, if the boys absolutely will not settle down, separated them and put them in different tents.

 

in fact, we have a rule at summer camp that you have to trade tentmates midweek. this has a double benefit of making sure the boys keep their stuff together, and getting them to know other members of the troop, instead of staying only with their best buddy.

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OGE,

For the part of a shy scout and the ceremony, I offer this. Practices and rehearsals conducted during the pre-opening or last meeting's after-meeting portion may help with the uneasiness of getting in front of a group. A troop guide or informal leader may be able to work with the scout where an adult may be intimidating. Just being part of a winning team, whether playing or not, builds esteem and confidence. Maybe if he was asked which part he would like would help, this way he is not avoiding responsibility of participating but easing into the spotlight. Maybe a win-win situation.

For the noisy tent partners. Maybe their patrol would select a site farther away from the rest, within a reasonable distance that would not allow for their nocturnal spirit to disrupt others. I think that if they couldn't quiet down maybe a move of their tent after the upteenth time to quiet down would fix this. Not a fun thing to do at late night and usually get desired results. Keep the days activities busy so they are tuckered out towards night. Those small nightly campfires burning into embers (a caveman's TV) can hypnotize them into retiring early.

I think that corrective action should pertain to the infringement (e.g. skips out on clean up, they get two clean ups; Using nature instead of latrine, maybe the latrine needs to be beautified or decorated (spider webs and pine needles) so it is not unpleasant. A rotating duty roster can help getting the chores done, and supplement the the roster with those extra helpers.

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