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cb2boys

Leader requirements?

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In our pack, we've noticed several of the leaders not living up to the commitments they have made...Example, coming to 1 Leader Mtg, then just asking CubMaster to "e-mail me if I miss anything", and not coming to anymore Leaders Mtgs....leaders not wearing CL A's to Pack Mtg (which we require), etc, etc, etc...

 

Does anyone have a "Leader guideline/requirements" they use to review with their leaders...we don't want to seem "strict", but on the other hand, they've stepped up to be a leader, and need to follow through to be the best they can be for their den/patrol.

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Ah, such a sticky subject. Someone has volunteered to be a leader, but isn't setting the best example.

 

Been there many years. Best I've been able to come up with is to show the example myself. Always in proper uniform, always on time, always make calls in advance if something comes up...like I said, set the example myself.

 

Mention nicely to your leaders that "we" are setting the example for "our" boys.

 

Mention too that all the boys that signed up to be cubscout/boyscouts deserve the best leaders (including said leader's own son).

 

But, always remember, these are volunteers. Their leadership to the boys is what is most important. Get that going first and worry about the proper uniforms later.

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Thanks for the info...will keep "reminding" them that WE are the examples...

 

where you from in SC? I grew up in Charlotte, NC, my oldest brother is an Eagle Scout out of Charlotte.

 

Thx!

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Ah ... the fine art of getting volunteers to devotely volunteer!

 

Been there ... and they have done that! Once upon a time, we had 15 dens and all den leaders (and asst den leaders) came. We had standing-room only. Then we made the mistake of taking minutes and emailing them! Leaders started to take for granted that they don't need to attend and still get up-to-date info from the Pack. We learned that in order to get them involved ... involve them!

 

1) We started to assign tasks to each den for the Pack meeting and they need to present their plan, tasks such as Pack meeting program plan or skit or song or clean up duties or ...

 

2) We do not send out minutes any more. If you weren't there, your den is volunteered for tasks or projects that you might not like! ;)

 

3) We do not hand out Pack's issued items at Pack meeting any more (such things like pinewood derby cars, tickets to B&G, etc.).

 

4) We do not allow one or two people run the meetings! We involve everyone who came. We solicit everyone's opinion.

 

5) We do send out invites to the meeting and sometimes call the ones who did not attend.

 

6) We do provide refreshment, coffee, etc.

 

7) We do involve all of them in the decision making.

 

8) We do insist that they attend themselves or send a representative.

 

9) We keep it to exactly 1 hour, that means that we do have an agenda and keep to it!

 

10) Finally, we recognize our leaders for things that they did for the Pack!

 

The leaders started to come back at least the majority of them!

 

Good luck!

 

1Hour

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The beginning of my username GWD stands for Greenwood, South Carolina.

 

Have 2 boys myself. Oldest now in college, an Eagle Scout that started in Tigers. Youngest is now a Star, also started in Tigers.

 

Been doing this scouting thing for quite a while!

 

Welcome to the forums.

 

 

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Thanks, gwd-scouter. That's the first time that anyone welcome me for over 3+ years on this forum. Oh, wait, you meant it for cb2boys. :) Yep ... welcome cb2boys!

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I agree that as leaders we need to set certain standards. But also I think that if things are not working out as expected, we need to consider why. Here are a few things I noticed when our pack faced similar concerns.

 

1. Are those expectations explicit? And are they supported by the group? You can have whatever expectations you want, but if others do not know about them (because they're only in your head) or if others do not buy in to them, they won't be met. Having a shared vision - which includes things like leader expectations is hard to develop but worth it in terms of actually getting results.

 

2. Are those expectations realistic? Have the leaders who aren't performing "up to snuff" in certain regards been given so much to do/focus on that some stuff is going to have to slide? Have they been to training? Or at least, are opportunities to get training abundant? Regarding the uniform, there is a cost factor involved so what, if anything, can the pack do to make sure that this isn't what's keeping some adults (and kids too!) from being fully uniformed?

 

3. Are your committee meetings "worth it?" After about a year, my husband simply refused to attend the monthly committee meetings any more although (at least I thought) he was otherwise a very committed den leader. He hated them because they were a complete waste of time; either gripe sessions or social hours, but either way, little of note was actually accomplished and they tended to go on forever. Can't say I blamed him as I often felt the same way. When I started running the meetings I tried hard to keep them short and to the point and attendance improved.

 

4. Can you afford to take steps that might result in losing otherwise-qualified leaders? Some people will simply never conform to your expectations about things like uniforming. You'll need to decide - as a group, not just you personally - whether it is worth losing an otherwise good leader over something like that. You may decide that uniforming is just that important to you and that's fine, as long as you have a very good replacement for the current leader who won't wear it.

 

As a person who has never bought into the uniform idea myself (in general, not just re: scouts), I can sympathize with those who don't want to wear it. It doesn't help that the adult scout uniforms are both expensive and ill-made, and it is unclear to many - especially at the cub pack level - why one ought to be expected to spend $100 for a lousy uniform.

 

Before anybody jumps on this, yes I do own and wear the full uniform. But it took a long time before I was a) willing to cough up the dough to buy it and b) really understood the value of wearing it even though I don't particularly care for it. And that change in attitude came through more exposure over time to the BSA program, to training (woodbadge in particular) that focused on the uniform method in ways other than "you should wear it because you should wear it" and through involvement with various units, some of which were full uniform and some of which were not.

 

As for a leader guideline, I think the best thing you can use is the existing Cub Leader Training material, including the Cub Leader Handbook. Why re-invent the wheel here?

 

Welcome to the group, cb2boys.

 

best,

Lisa'bob

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I have found that positive reinforcement works better than negative. How about keeping track of den performance (attendance at leader meetings, advancement, training status, uniforming, parent attendance at Pack meetings, etc) and at the end of the year, the "winning den" gets a free pizza party (or similar motivating reward). Just a stray thought...

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We have no written uniforming requirements for adult leaders other than what is recommended by the BSA. We do ask that adult leaders (CM & DL's) who work directly with the boys to at least wear a uniform shirt to all den and pack meetings. Uniform pants are optional. We don't require our cubs to wear uniform pants, so we don't put that requirement on the adults.

 

I agree with the previous posts. Setting the example wearing your uniform speaks volumes to the other volunteers. You don't have to say a word to convince them and if they stick with the program, they will get their uniforms in time. If not, no big deal; this is the Cub Scouts, not the military. Forcing someone to pay $70-100 to get outfitted in a uniform may cause you to lose them for good.

 

If money is truly the reason that the leader cannot get uniformed, then consider helping help him buy one. Of course, I would only do this if the leader was truly devoted and enthusiastic.

 

 

 

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