Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
sctmom

That retention thing again

Recommended Posts

We started a Venture Crew at a National Guard Armory last year. I have not seen the scouts so excited since they were new to cubs. The Venture co-ed program is the fastest growing youth movement in the country (that I have heard of). New adventure and they really feal that they are running the show.

 

As for Eagle Scout, we have had 3 since we started Ventureing (Venture Scouts can receive credit towards Eagle while working on their Ranger Award). They like receiving double credit, not available in our scout troop.

 

More than half of the military personel here have had some scouting experience and many of the leaders are Eagle Scouts. To our Venture Crew - Eagle Scout is more than just a trophy for their college resume.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High adventure is the usual answer to older Scouts that are bored with their Troop's standard trips. If these older Scouts are 16 or 17 years of age, an interview with the Scoutmaster can get them a position as a Junior Assistant Scoutmaster. These duties are anything an adult Assistant Scoutmaster does, and that can include just about anything based on the needs of that specific Troop's program, and what this Scout would like to do. That's just one possibility for a Scout who doesn't want to leave the program but doesn't care to do high adventure. There's much more.....

 

Anderson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earning Eagle still matters at those institutions that still matter. I just helped one on my Eagles fill out his applications for acceptance to the Virginia Military Institute and an application for an Army ROTC scholarship. On both applications there were separate sections for Eagle Scout and other Boy Scout data. There were no special discrete sections for sports or student government, etc. All of that stuff was lumped together in a "tell us what you were invloved in in high school" section. But Eagle Scout had it's own section on the application. So obviously it matters to them. I would not feel disappointed by those colleges who no longer consider attaining Eagle Scout a good thing....I just wouldn't give them my business. Obviously they have lowered their standards. Don't apply there. Have nothing to do with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are these boys advancing (being channeled) into leadership roles or positions that reflect their knowledge and experience? Particularly those that have attained the rank of Eagle. Or are they still just one of the rest of the gang? Keeping these boys in a challenging role is an important part of their wanting to continue in Scouting. Whether it's as a Troop Guide, Jr. Asst. Scoutmaster, etc. or simply a recognized mentor for young Scouts, put them into a role that challenges them to take the next step in leadership and allows them to continue accomplishments of value to the troop and themselves.

 

As for Eagles "gaining advantages" so to speak. I regularly interview candidates for fire and emergency medical positions. Having achieved the rank of Eagle usually gains them a point or two on the interview right off the top. I know that these folks should already have at least the very basics for the position even with no prior emergency service experience and they should have an aptitude for learning a wide range of skills. The potential plum is in how they answer the question "Are you still involved in Scouting?" A "Yes" gains them a significant advantage. This is the type of person I'm looking for. (Same goes for Girl Scouts)

 

There is the "Trail to Eagle" and then there is the "Eagle Trail". 2% complete the Trail to Eagle. Fewer yet complete the Eagle Trail. That only begins upon award of the Eagle badge. Those that continue on the Eagle Trail demonstrate a deep understanding of the true spirit of Scouting. When I network (geez I hate that word) with other organizational and business leaders I never hesitate to remind them that these people are the potential golden nuggets that have the capacity to lead their organizations to a higher level and not to let them slip away without at least a good hard look during an interview process. Fortunately, I have yet to be let down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×