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MountainMan

Who makes the best tent & sleeping bag for back packing?

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Who makes the best tent for back packing?

 

Tent

3 season, 2 person light weight High Adventure for Back Packing.

 

Speeping Bag

3 Season (maybe 15 degrees) I am not certain concerning the temp.

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MM,

 

Check out Sierra Designs Gamma tent. It is one of there lowest cost tents, but is packed with features. My son has one and loves it. I've used it and liked it too. It is a "two man" tent. It has good height and weight. It also sports a full rainfly. It runs around $150 which is a steal compared to many backpacking tents from other name brand companies. If you look arounf on the internet or check e-bay, you might pick it up even cheaper. I don't think you would be disappointed with it.

 

Sleeping bag? Not sure, I'm in the market myself. My son has a Sierra Designs Flex bag. It is a mummy bag with a nice innovation. The internal baffles are made from an elastic fabric that gives about 6 inches of stretch for people who shift positions and don't like the confinement of a mummy bag. It is designed for people who sleep on their sides or tummy instead of just on their back. It also has what they call a ngith cap hood. It is roomy enough that you can pull your arms up under your head and still keep them covered. If it is really cold, the hood can be cinched down around your head like a traditional mummy hood. They make both a synthetic and down version and are good down to about 15 degrees I believe. The synthetic can run around $200. I found my son's at www.hiltonstentcity.com for $139.00.

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Yes it does and all seams are factory sealed.....for real. We have not had to seal any seams like we did with my Coleman.

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This is a question with at least as many answers as there are people in the forum! My suggestion is for you to do some research, make a list of the features that you want to see in your equipment, decide how much money you want to spendand then go look at some gear. Remember that you will not need a 0 degree sleeping bag if you will be camping in July and August.

 

If you're looking for a tent with "name recognition" that says WOW! You can get a Bibler or Hilleberg.

 

Good Luck.

 

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I use a tarp when I'm backpacking - total weight less than 24 oz. the particular one I'm using now does not have a bottom which doesn't bother me. I have a Sierra Design sleeping bag rated to 15 degrees which I use primarily for "car camping" and either use a fleece sleeping bag (Target - $10) or a Lafuma summer bag good to about 45 degrees.

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Don't the mosquitos eat you alive?

 

Around here, if you aren't either inside or coated with DEET by sundown, you are mosquito bait - which also brings the risk of West Nile Virus.

 

I remember when I camped in the Boundary Waters in northern MN that mosquitos would come out instantly at the same time each night (around sundown). My tent-mate and I were careful to watch the time and be ready to dive into the tents when the mosquitos showed up. A couple that was along with routinely would ignore the time and not be ready. Every night we enjoy the same scene of these people running around trying to put stuff away before finally diving into their tent.

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Mountainman, take a look at the thread on Backpacking Tent, there are some recommendation for the tents. I put my review on two, Mountaineering Mystique 2 ($140 regular price, $56 on a manufacturer pro-purchase discount ... I think that I even got a link to the manufacturer in that thread) and REI 1/2 Dome 2 ($159). I have used the Mystique four times now, twice in nice weather, once in light snow, and once in a down pour. It stood up fairly well in all three weather conditions without leaks. It has two side doors with fairly nice size vestibules on each side. As I have pointed out, the Mystique doesn't have a "base" where I can pick up the whole tent and shake loose the dirt and water. It is a very good tent nevertheless. It weighs in about 5 lb - 2oz.

 

I recently bought the REI's 1/2 Dome 2 for my oldest on his b-day (got it when it was on sale $109 two months ago). There are two scoutmasters in our troop who have this tent for the past 2 years and have not had any problem with them. This tent is spacious and has two large vestibules on each side. The tent is spacious enough that one of the scoutmasters use his small cot in it. You can pick up the 1/2 Dome 2 up by its poles and shake loose the dirt. Both tents' poles are made with aircraft aluminum and the seams are factory sealed; however, it would be good to put another coat of sealant (in any tent) prior to use.

 

My son and I both have Coleman's Exponent mummy bag (hollofil) one rated for 0 (his) and one rated for 15, weigh about almost 2 lbs each. They kept us fairly toasty in a couple of 20 degree nights. But together the tent and the sleeping bag already take up 7 precious lbs! But during hot season, a simple blanket is what we bring (reducing the weigh from 2 lbs to about 15 oz.)!

 

Bath tube bottom? I don't know the term. You must have referred to a tube-tent http://www.thru-hiker.com/reviews.asp?subcat=3&cid=60 . That's light-weight backpacking. Down here in East Texas territory, we need all the meshing and cover we can get to fend off some of the mosquitoes.

 

 

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OneHour,

 

He meant bath tub floor. It is where the floor (hopefully a single piece of fabric) curves up and attaches to the tent walls several inches above ground level. It keeps those pesky seams with all their needle holes from being at ground level and leaking from ground water. Of course, the one problem with a bath tub floor is when the roof leaks and you end up with several inches of water being held in the bottom of the tent! :)

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Actually Tarp does not quite explain what it is. Go to http://www.tarptent.com the model that I use is the Squall. Mosquitos are not a problem due to the noseeum netting. No Daddy Longlegs are are a different issue, they personally don't bother me.

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ScouterPaul,

 

That's one 'purdy neat' tent, at 24 oz and 42" height ... that's going light weight! All that tarp for $180 ... I guess there is a price to pay for going lightweight!

 

1Hour(This message has been edited by OneHour)

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OneHour - What's purdy to one person isn't to the other. I've had mine for several years and paid a lot less than 180.00. If you pay attention to the website you would find plans to build your own (A Scout is Thrifty) which I did for my first version. I liked it so well that I gave it to a friend and bought my current version. And yes you are correct about lightweight gear costing money - it seems that the lighter it weighs the more it cost. I also believe in paying for quality.

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ScouterPaul, it is a very neat little tent. When my youngest hits the backpacking age (he's 5 right now), I'll probably look into this . My three boys and I will contemplate on some longer backpacking trips. Right now, my oldest and I are starting to break into this backpacking experience and are enjoying it thoroughly (minus the backache :) )! Thanks,

 

1Hour

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