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Brewmeister

Best sleeping pad for old geezers?

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Lots of recommendations regarding hammocks, but those aren't going to work in your average tent, unless I'm missing something.

 

???

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Brew....your getting advise from folks with a lot of years of experience. I struggled on the ground for years until I took a nap in hammock at summer camp.....I immediately ordered on and refuse to be a grounddweller again.

 

Gunny....the entire sleep system is lighter for backpacking, hammock, tarp, and sleeping bag or quilt.. my entire sleep system weighs less than the SM tent. Hot summer nights it is much cooler with air circulating around you. Afternoon naps at summer camp are much more comfortable. you are not victimized by water flowing into your tent during rain storms. no condensation on the inside of the tent. No dealing with roots or rocks or uneven ground.

 

 

The Blackbird also has a food box on the end of the hammock so you sleep diagonally in the hammock and there is no tension on your legs or back.....I looked at Hennesy when I bought my warbonnet, but didn't like the velcro bottom entry, a problem for under quilts and winter camping, they have since changed the design and offer a side zip.(This message has been edited by Basementdweller)

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Brew,

 

Basically what we are talking about is using a hammock along with a tarp. No tent required. When my oldest son became a Scout, and I started going on outings, I got tired of dragging out the cabin tent and cot (my previous choice). It took too long to set up, and was overkill. So I got my cheapo 2 person tent (from my single days) and a pad. Had a miserable night sleep. Next campout, I made a hammock from 4 yds of nylon, and used a cheapo poly tarp. Best night I had sleeping outdoors in years (better than a cot even). Now I have a 12x12 tarp over my homemade hammock and sleep even better. The only downside is when the camp location doesn't have convenient trees. Then I have to go to ground.

 

For more information go to:

http://www.tothewoods.net/

http://www.hammockforums.net

 

 

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I'm not ignoring the advice, just trying to figure out the logistics.

 

I think I'd have to try out a setup before taking the plunge into hammocking.

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If you do have to take a hammock to ground, all you really need is two trekking poles and some extra cordage (550 cord, etc.) Easy to make a tent out of it if necessary.

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Brew,

 

You can get a usable hammock online for about $20 (or using JustJeff's directions can make a DIY for about the same price). Get some lashing straps from Harbor Freight, a 10x8 blue tarp, a blue walmart pad(or your current sleeping pad) (if temp below 60 degrees) and some line. That's enough for an experiment.

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Brew,

 

Looking back at the thread, I realize that a lot of hammockers are evangelists, spreading the word of the gospel of the hammock. We are enthusiastic about it, because it works so well for us.

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Doing my part to spread the gospel of hammocking. Best night's sleep I have ever had. Discovering the hammock started my quest to lighten my backpack weight (or did my quest start with the hammock? Hum, not sure which came first, like the chicken and the egg...). Regardless, what was a 15 lbs of backpack, sleeping bag and pads and tent, is now down to just over 6 lbs, and I sleep soooo much better. Long live the trees!

 

The original poster asked about pads. My son and I have been researching this for him. He has decided to go with the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite (small). It is 2.5" thick, insulated and weighs in at 8 oz. This is for Philmont (which does not allow hammocks--blasphemers!), and it looks like it will work out very well for him. The small only goes down to just below his knees, so he adds a cut section of WalMart blue foam pad for his feet. Outside of the tent, this 16" square pad makes a great insulated seat on a rock, log or ground. Add 1.8 oz for the foam pad.

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My preferred sleeping pad is my Stearns & Foster, but if I need something mobile, Winnebago works.

 

Sorry...couldn't resist.

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Another happy NeoAir user. As a side sleeper you definitely want a pad over 2". There are those much cheaper than a Neo but also much heavier and bulkier. I'd be willing to try hammocking but most of my preferred camping is above treeline.

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The thing I hate about trying to sleep in a hammock is that I barely sleep and I feel in the morning like I've been folded into a pretzel. I need to be able to straighten myself out, and I'm not able to get comfortable folded into a hammock.

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drmbear,

I haven't tried it myself yet, but my understanding is that the problem you mention is a result of a traditional hammock.

Most of the ones people here are talking about are diagonal or offset sleeping systems where you wind up sleeping much flatter and not so much like a banana.

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drmbear,

 

Go to one of the Hammock sites for more info. Best way for most of us is to sleep diagonally in a hammock. It is almost flat then.

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