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moxieman

Lifeguard now required for Safety Afloat?!?

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Eagle92

 

Look I received my BSA Lifeguard certification in 1970, I even still have my patch, so I know how hard it was in the "good old days" while it was more difficult then then today the teens in my crew were LA County Lifeguards and their training was much more intense than the BSA training ever was. Having an ex Navy seal is also a big bonus, he has given advanced water rescue and CPR training to the entire crew, and IMHO most any of them would leave a BSA Lifeguard in the dust. So if I wear my old BSA Lifeguard patch on my swimming trunks does that still make me qualified, lol, just kidding.

 

OGE, That remark in quotes from my prior post was and still is a very commonly used phrase in many walks of life, in fact one of the people I first heard use it a while back was a catholic priest, Pax.

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Knowing the contempt you have for things Roman Catholic, I did not think you would ever defend yourself by comparing yourself to a priest

 

I would have thought a PhD from Harvard would have a much richer command of the English langauge and have the ability to communicate in a non-vulgar manner.

 

 

(This message has been edited by oldgreyeagle)

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BP,

 

Curious, what type of training did the LA County ones go through? Is that the program, sorry forget it's name but beleive it's based out of Hawaii, that deals with shark attacks, rescues with serious surf, etc.? One of the guards I worked with in college was from there and had that cert, which no one ever heard of before. From what she described, yep it is harder than BSA.

 

As for your lifeguarding skills, I'ld bet you a box oven cobbler of your choice that if things hit the fan, you would go into automode and make the rescue with little to no complications. I've seen that happen before .

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If a unit at our council camp in Michigan wants to go on a canoe trip off base they must have CPR, safety afloat and paddlecraft safety. Since the council is a separate corporation they indeed can add anything they want for getting a tour permit. this may be something that is required by their liability insurance or a state law that superceeds BSA rules.

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"Most Boy Scout-age youth that I know use far coarser language than that, alas."

 

I would hope they don't learn it from their Scoutmasters.

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OGE and Frank

 

Both of you have said much much worse in this forum over the years so don't give me your holier than thou attitudes because you both lack any real credibility. I put that statement in quotes for a reason, I was quoting someone else and I thought it fit in this instance. Now you both can go back to watching Leave it to Beaver and thinking of the good old days, lol. What a couple of hypocrites.

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Eagle92

 

You can go to the website, lacountylifeguards.org, and get a pretty good breakdown of the program. It is considered to be one of the toughest in the country.

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BP,

 

Thanks for the info. I've never heard of the American Lifeguarding Association or Global Lifeguards before but that doesn't mean anything. In reveiwing their syllabus, looks like the old YMCA course I use to teach. Glad they still teach multiple drownings, escapes and releases, etc. But the online stuff does concern me.

 

edited: too bad they don't have any contact person info for NC, wouldn't mind getting more info.(This message has been edited by Eagle92)

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National does not require a qualified lifeguard in the group for a routine boating activity, including a multi day float trip UNLESS there is a non swimmer in the group. Perhaps the person disapproving the tour permit had or obtained knowledge that one or more non swimmers were going on the event.

 

One of the prior posts pointed out that a council may have the right to impose more rigorous requirements than does national.

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eisely,

 

non-swimmers have relaxed requirements now. There is no longer a need for a lifeguard in the case of boating non-swimmers.

 

"For activity afloat, those not classified as a swimmer are limited to multiperson craft during outings or float trips on calm water with little likelihood of capsizing or falling overboard. They may operate a fixed-seat rowboat or pedal boat accompanied by a buddy who is a swimmer. They may ride in a canoe or other paddle craft with an adult swimmer skilled in that craft as a buddy. They may ride as part of a group on a motorboat or sailboat operated by a skilled adult."

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