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WildernesStudent

Any pointers for canoeing?

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Ok, so maybe it wasn't 20 degrees (more like 30) but it sure felt cold! Infact, I am still cold this morning (and probably getting sick too...who knows what was actually in that water)BTW I figured out what end of the canoe is the front (I would like to brag that it was my own recent aquired knowledge but the fact was the emblem of the company was on the one end)Also, it looks like I may have found someone to give me a couple lessons (I don't think they know what they're getting into) Also, i'm planning on taking a WFA course our school offers (for our Outdoor ed majors) think of me while I'm running around the woods trying to look like I know what I'm doing lol ;) My friends have dropped the idea of a flat river and now want to canoe down the Chatahoochee...I don't think can actually do that in a canoe but they're under the impression that it is personal opinon.

 

Anyone actually been on that river??

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I've never been on the Chattahoochee River, but here's what the National Park Service says about boating on the river. Be safe, and have fun:

 

The 48 miles of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area is available for raft, canoe, kayak, motor boat and other small boat use year round. Jet skis are not permitted at any time. The river remains a cool temperature year-round, rarely getting warmer than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The river within the park is open for boating from 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset. Night boating is not permitted in the park.

 

The river offers excellent opportunities for leisurely paddling a raft, canoe or kayak to observe wildlife and wildflowers, do some fishing, or simple relaxing recreation.

 

On days when Buford Dam is not releasing water, the river below the dam is calm "flat water" with an occasional class I/II shoals or rapids. Currents can be strong around submerged rocks and jagged tree snags that are found in the river. Rubber-soled shoes are a must for tackling slippery rocks and the occasional broken glass bottle.

 

The river is accessible by boat North of Morgan Falls Dam at Bowmans Island, Abbotts Bridge, Medlock Bridge, Jones Bridge, Island Ford, and Chattahoochee River Park along Bull Sluice Lake.

 

South of Morgan Falls Dam the river is accessible by boat at Morgan Falls Park, Johnson Ferry, Powers Island and Paces Mill.

 

Even if you don't have your own boat to use, there is equipment available for rental. The Chattahoochee NRA does not rent boats directly, however there are several vendors licensed to rent canoes, kayaks, rafts, and tubes for day use on the river.

 

 

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WildernessStudent, if you are looking for information about specific rivers, I suggest taking a look at the American Whitewater website. They have a information of just about every river in the country that can be paddled, including current conditions, suggested put-in and take-out points, and sometimes maps.

 

http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River_view_

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My advice...come to Virginia in June. Put in on the James River at Bent Creek. Float 9 miles to James River State Park. Wear life jackets. Most places even the shortest boy can stand up when canoe tips...not if. Rapids don't even rate as a Class 1. Beaches to stop for lunch and swimming. Great place to learn canoeing skills. Don't drink the water since cows along the bank use it as a latrine. Fish for trout along the way.

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trout on the middle James???

 

smallmouth, rock bass, blue gills, pickerel, catfish,even long nose gar...but trout???? (don't think so...unless some one drops them in)

 

great river.... but trout are up in the hills.

 

Anarchist

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Hmm, so I thought I'd let you all know what's going down.

 

We're going white water rafting next month (hopefully it will be about ten degrees warmer)

We are attempting the class 3 and 4 rapids so no canoe

and we are going with our oc club and a professional guide (it's very relieving giving all the responsibility over to someone else let them make the mistakes and I can sit back and look completley innocent)

 

Now, we are still planning to go again this summer, I know a couple people wanted to start out with class 5 rapids (which is next to class 6 which are the ones with the skull on the signs....a little to close for me but hay I am wilderness adventure woman...i can do anything!! ;) at least this will give us some experience, and if I don't fall out of the raft I will consider it a good sign (that is a very big if)

 

so, think about me in the coming weeks. I'll have to tell you guys about it when I get back (that is if I come back and I am being completely serious...some how having a guide just makes everything seem more dangerous...well look, I just woke up to reality!). Who knows, maybe one of ya'll will be out there while I am. :)

(This message has been edited by WildernesStudent)

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Our unit usually does a whitewater trip every other year and always with a professional outfitter. Whitewater trips really do get your blood pumping and it's always one of our best attended events.

 

I always love the part when the guide gives the newbies, the "This ain't no Disneyland park ride, so do what I tell you to do when I tell you to do it!" speech.

 

SA

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Be safe, and have fun. Make sure to wear a wetsuit for protection against the cold water during the run. If you'll be on the Chattahoochee, water temperature will be around 50 degrees Farenheit in April.

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Yeah, sorry, a wetsuit is not something I just have in the back of my closet and i'm not to keen on buying one for a couple of trips. What else could I wear instead...def. not cotton right? What shoes should I wear?

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Scoutingagain is absolutely correct. Most reputable outfitters will rent you a wetsuit which will protect you should you fall into 50 degree water for about 1 hour.

 

Have fun. We did a 23-mile whitewater run down the Gallatin River in Montana a few years ago on some Class IV and V rapids. Temperature was about 50 - 55 degrees F. It was a most excellent trip, and the scenery was to die for.

 

For shoes, just wear anything with non-slippery soles that will dry out quickly.

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I'm sure that you will be telling people to:

 

Sit down, you're rocking the boat

 

 

(something I picked up from reading another thread)

 

or

 

don't flip the boat over and keep it upright. :)(This message has been edited by OldGrayOwl)

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What happens if I don't wear a wetsuit?

 

Oh, and another question. Someone informed me that if one does happen to fall into the water they're supposed to go down the river feet first so that they can push off of rocks...now I have a bad knee, if I attempt to do that my knee will dislocate itself and then I will only have one leg to work with... (not a very nice thought)but in all honesty how high are the chances of someone falling in the water for very long...i mean aren't the guides there to get you out immediatly? Lol, I suppose it is a slightly stupid question...

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If you don't fall into the river, nothing will happen if you don't wear a wetsuit. If, however, you do fall into 50 degree F. water without a wetsuit for more than about 60 seconds, you may drown because you will be so cold that you may not be able to swim to safety.

 

When you fall in the river, the reason you are supposed to go down river feet first is so that you can navigate the river and avoid hitting your head on the rocks or other debris and become unconscious--not good when you are trying to save yourself. Better to have a dislocated knee than be rendered unconscious while trying to survive a raging river.

 

The chances of falling into a river for very long will depend on several things including the class of rapids you are traversing and your guide's ability to successfully navigate the whitewater in a raft. The guide's main job is to help steer the raft down the river safely and hopefully get everyone out alive in order to do it again at another time (repeat business).

 

If you fall out of the raft, don't think that the guide will leave all the other passengers just to fish you out of the water. You are pretty much on your own, so make sure you know how to survive on your own in 50 degree water until you can get safely ashore.

 

If you don't believe me, verify this for yourself by noticing all the "hold harmless" clauses in the waivers your group must sign before your outfitter/guide will let you on the river.

 

As I've said several times now, be safe first, and have fun always.

 

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