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He is the Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster should advise the CO if a Scout does not reflect their values. If the CO has no problem, than there is no problem.

 

Example:

 

A Catholic Scoutmaster of a Catholic church discovers an older Scout has impregnated his girlfriend. Does he sign the Scout off for Scout Spirit ("...duty to God", "A Scout is Reverent")? Or, does the Scoutmaster advise the Scout that his actions do not reflect the values of the organization. In this case, what do you think the CO will say?

 

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Assuming that the Scout's girlfiend (and I have to say this is one of the more outrageous situations that this string has concocted)is the scout's age, he would be battling charges of statuatory rape. I doubt that advancing a rank in Boy Scouts would be high on his list of things to do.

 

I would highly recommend his removal by the CO for behavior that dishonored both organizations.

 

I agree a BOR can be used for other puposes, however for somrthing on the scale of removing membership, the parents should be involved. Since the BOR does not have autority to remove membership it would be inappropriate to have such a discussion at that time. BORs should be motivating not threatening or punishing.

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Bob,

 

What? No teenaged Scout ever got his teenaged girl friend pregnant? I agree that it's not common, but I've bet its happened more than a couple of times.

 

Statutory rape? Do you always have to muddy the waters with something? Let's assume the boy and girl are the same age.

 

Use the BOR for membership removal? You keep adding things that I never said. I simply said that the BOR should be suspended or postponed upon making such a discovery. The Chartering Organization should be advised before proceeding with the BOR. The values of the chartering organization do count.

 

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Wow Bob! I can't believe you caved! Whoa!

 

WAIT. ..I was just joking! :) I appreciate the fact that we can agree on something. I feel vindicated.

 

Now I can bring this discussion full circle. I want to take back something I said about 8 or 9 pages ago. In reference to men with tattoos, I said, "for the most part, I see it as a character flaw". I was wrong. I have thought about this lately. I realize there are many good reasons why one might want a tattoo. The most noble of which, I feel, is to show one's pride in having served one's country. Some want to express love for people close to them. I'm sure there are other reasons as well. My perspective prior to this was focused on the individuals striving to draw attention to themselves. This, I still perceive as a character flaw. However, to everyone else, I sincerely apologize if I offended you.

 

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Personally I don't see how an unobtrusive stud in a boy's ear does much harm. Character training is more important.

 

Lots of boys get a stud or two put in their ears, often with Mom organizing the whole thing. This is a plain fact.

 

A boy can be encouraged to be reliable, ready to take sensible initiative, punctual, honest, and yes, godly I'm not afraid of the word ; such qualities are hardly related to the tiny stud which routinely errupts through many a boy's ear-lobe.

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mommascout:

 

Thanks. Yes, it's no big deal.

 

BTW, on the other thread you said your son was 14: has he already had his ear(s) pierced?

 

It's just a little hole and so many boys have them.

 

Regards.

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Yes, he is 14 years old and has had his ear pierced ( only one hole) since age 10 or 11. It has not effected his character in any negative way. It's a simple fashion statement, nothing more. There are many days when he does not even wear the earring as it is not a priority in his life. As you said many boys and men today enjoy wearing an earring or two or three...

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Hmmmm - oddly interesting thread. One thing fascinating about it is that is has drawn a lot more attention that threads in which, for instance, new leaders are seeking program help :)

 

Many scouts I have known in the O.A., especially the dance team, have had their ears pierced to wear more authentic dance regalia. Does that strike anyone as anti-social?

 

I found the Catholic Church item interesting. Was it meant to imply that Protestant churches don't care if scouts impregnate their girl friends? Does anyone think that the way two teens DEAL with making a mistake like that is at least as important as making it in the first place? There are in fact honorable ways to handle unwanted pregnancies. Even for us Catholics :)

 

RE: statutory rape, in most states there has to be a significant (e.g. 7 years or more) age difference before it can be prosecuted.

 

I have raised 4 Eagle Scout sons. All have had some minor way to rebel, like hair, music, etc., and that is a normal and necessary part of growing up and finding out who you are. I never felt it was important as long as they stayed true to the important values - like honesty, fairness, decency, etc. I don't care if a young gentleman has his ear pierced or his hair orange (and I've had scouts with both) so long as he tells the truth, helps his community, respects his elders, and obeys the laws of the land. Focu on what's important.

 

I had my own ear pierced at age 26, well over 25 years ago, and I think I'm a pretty nice guy. At least that's what I hear all the time. Seems to me

that making a mountain out of this particular mole hill says more about personal insecurity than anything else. It takes courage to let other people be different without feeling the need to condemn them for it. A scout is brave.

 

My two cents.

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Sorry if I got the law thing wrong Bruce. Lawyering is not my thing. My point was that the boy had more pressing things on his plate than advancement. By the way I like your response better.

Bob

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mommascout:

 

Thanks.

 

As one who has rather conservative values really, I think that character and moral resilience are what really count. For example, Ephesians 3.16 speaks of being 'strengthened...in the inner man'. For boys to learn constructive outward behaviour, they need to be encouraged in inner qualities: in the end I don't think that such considerations can lead people lightly to the reject foundational Christian principles whihc have been so influencial.

 

As far as earrings are concerned, they are hardly central to the cultivation of inner qualities in a boy.

 

At the same time, as your 14-year old will probably testify, for a boy it can be a source of good, clean, innocent fun to be organized by a parent to have the lobe of an ear sterilized and marked up and a ring forced through. (Some boys like it so much that they have it done again!)

 

fella

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It is written into our troop handbook, "During scout related activities, scouts are asked not to wear jewelery. This includes rings, earrings, necklaces, and wallet chains. A wristwatch may be worn in most cases. Also, scouts are not to wear any type of clothing that advertises alcohol or tobacco products."

Our boys have not had a problem with this policy. We go along with the school handbook as much as we can when establishing our policies.

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