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red feather

campin, cookin, survival tidbits

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Weekender mentioned waterproofing canvas. I have never tried or heard of using Thompson's. I have a 12x12 canvas wall and floor tent. For the walls I use a waterproofing made specifically for canvas which comes in a gallon container with a pump type sprayer. For the ceiling and floor I use mink oil. A bit on the expensive side but keeps it dry as a bone.

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Hawk,

 

The mink oil sounds interesting...I've used it on leather but never canvas. I know with a tent the size of yours wieght is not an issue but mine is a backpacking canvas tent a little under 6 lbs (I think) it seems the mink oil would increase the weight significantly...what do you think?

 

Weekender

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Yes, I would agree with you it will add more weight than traditional types of waterproofing sprays. It's a trade off you'll have determine. When I use mine for backpacking, I mean backbreaking trips, the 6oz. added to 80lbs. is nothing. If you decide to give it a try, I've found that leaving the canvas in the sun long enough to warm up helps the oil penetrate better. It seems to keep the canvas more pliable also. Good Luck.

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Red Feather potassium permanganate should be recognised in your chemist / drug store(?). One of the attractive things about it is that with any moisture it will stain everything purple and you only need a small amount too. Scouts love the 'risk' of getting stained!

 

Any of the iodine solutions often found in first aid kits will do the same job in purifying water. Not as good as boiling which is safer than any chemical treatment available. Just don't use so much of the iodine / p permanganate / purification tablets that the water becomes unpalatable. With the first two choices the water will always change colour and taste - all depends on how worried you are I guess.

 

As for stating fire with PP you will find that lots of downwards pressure with your thumb in the dish of the spoon and then drag it quickly but only a short distance and the PP will ignite. The sugar will then burn and produce a big long lasting ember that you can pick up in the spoon and carry over to the prepared fire. It works best on an unsanded peice of flat board / lumber (?) Mix the sugar and PP together a bit before starting. As for fire by friction it comes easy to some and others must battle with it. Most scouts pick it up within 5 minutes and under 6 trys.

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My son and I both have those silver, bullet-shaped stainless steel insulated bottles for hot/cold drinks that are popular in Asia. I've got a .75 liter one, he has a .3 liter one. If we know it's going to be a cold night, we boil up water, fill the bottle (making sure the stoppers are tight), and it goes in the bottom of our sleeping bag, next to our feet, inside a sock. The bottle releases enough heat to help keep the bag/feet warmer, and in the morning when you wake up, it's still hot enough to make a drink with.

 

KS

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Direction finding at night without a compass:

 

Tough to use stars in Korea -- lights wash most out, especially the North star if you're looking toward Seoul for it as we are.

 

An alternative method: You need two sticks, preferably of uneven lengths, and a clear view of either the moon or a planet. Push the sticks in the ground about three feet apart, so the tips of the sticks and the moon/planet are all lined up together when you get down behind the low stick and look past the high stick, to the moon/planet...as if you were aiming the sights of a rifle at the moon/planet.

 

Wait about 15 minutes, then sight along the sticks again being careful not to disturb them. Where is the moon/planet?

 

- If it's higher than the original "aim point", you're facing east.

 

- If it's lower than the original "aim point", you're facing west.

 

- If it's to the left of the original "aim point", you're facing north.

 

- If it's to the right of the original "aim point", you're facing south.

 

These are approximate, of course, and will be less accurate the closer you are to one of the poles.

 

KS

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On the subject of waterproofing canvas I'm now nearing the end of my current project, the making of a "ration bag" out of two canvas tote bags found at Wally World. The bag has been dyed a dark brown using a walnut dye, and coated with a fairly thick application of boiled linseed oil which will require about a week to dry becoming quite waterproof afterwards. However, to ensure absolute water proofness, the seams will be coated with beeswax...

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If any troops still actually cook over wood fires: have the scouts coat the OUTSIDE of their cook pots with liquid dish soap, being careful not to get any on the inside (unless you like sudsy beans and lots of latrine time!). When it comes time for cleanup, the scouts will think you're a genius when the black stuff on the pots merely washes off without scrubbing with a Brillo pad! When I was a young scout, it was unheard of not to "soap your pots" before cooking, of course, we didn't have propane back then.

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Welcome all to 2003! With a new year, time for more and new ideas and tidbits. Bring them on so all can learn and enjoy from the knowledge.

 

Did you know that the typical green can holds 2 cups of water?

 

Experiened scouters and new please post what you have learned through the school of hard knocks or the school of how about that.

 

yis

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Okay, I'll try one more time. Recent threads generate over a hundred responses in just a few days. A new one BSA is dying talks about the perception of scouts and scouting. I want to continue this thread to show that there is a parts of scouting that have value and one of them is campin, cookin, etc. skills that the scouts learn.

 

I noticed that I said a typical green can holds two cups of water. Oops, a typical green bean can... Just enough for most dehydrated meals.

 

KS keep em coming. Many things learned in the back 40 is very good. I remember using c-ration peanut butter with bug juice as a fuel source to heat food.

 

I was able to use my learned scouting skills to create a foil dinner in Europe while driving convoy duty on the engine of my duece and a half.

 

 

Any tin can suggestions?I have had good luck with tin can ovens. And have used a hanger to create a handle that clips onto a tin can to use as a coffee cup.

 

 

When using rope to hang a tarp or to create an emergency shelter that come down to the tarp, tie a string to that rope to create a drip line. this prevents most of the moisture reaching the tarp.

 

To get a good spark from the scouting fire starter use a small section of hacksaw. Creates a shower of sparks.

 

Join in and show what we can do.

 

yis

 

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a cyalume lantren can be made from bamboo, or pvc for directional lighting. Drill out one end, and make a slit along the length to whatever length and width is desired (3/4" x 5" as an example). This will make reading, or checking the map at night easier without the glare.. to keep the cyalume from falling out use a cork for the bamboo, or a cap for the pvc....

 

 

 

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For those with Venture crews being introduced to blackpowder shooting/hunting, it's a frustration and a safety concern to have the gun dry fire because the lubed patch has dampen the powder. A simple technique to prevent this is to add a bit of dry farina, cream of wheat, or cornmeal between the powder and the lubed patch...as for the amount needed you'll need to guesstimate for the gun you're using, for my .62 I'm guessing that the 1 1/2 teaspoons of cornmeal used gives about a 1/4 inch of seperation between the charge and the patch.....

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The squat plastic koolaid or similar powdered drinks container makes a excellent first aid kit or survival container. These are the ones that are half to 3/4 the size of a small coffee can. These containers are waterproof and unless packed too full will float. They are also usually a bright color and easy to spot. The ones I use have white tops that take permament marker information very well.

 

yis

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I know, I know, dead horse and all BUT, heard a story recently from a Guardsman that when tents were delivered without the 'proper' rope tensioners the tents were not being put up. Being a Scout leader he showed the troops how the BSA does it and the tents went up.

 

These little nuggets are important. Pass on the wisdom, experiences, embarrasing moments, whatever we can. We learn from each other and each has skills that all cannot have.

 

Recently the term 'stealth' readers were mentioned, come on guys and gals give. The boys are all you have to lose. Join and give.

 

Such as a Monkey fist with a one inch leader into a loop provides a good weight to throw a rope to raise a bear bag. Using bright or even a light stick can prevent the comment...where did it go?...look out!! (of course the bear bag rope was tied on with a sheep shank with a half hitch to ensure attachement to the monkey fist)

 

yis

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