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red feather

campin, cookin, survival tidbits

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Similar post as in another forum. Looking for tips, recipes (utensiless) etc. Such as using metal shower curtain hangers on backpack to attach items to. Especially to dry clothing as you hike. Wrapping duct tape to frame of backpack as a convienent way to store it. Mud spuds, spit roasted eggs, etc. All welcome and appreciated. Thanks

YIS

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Survival kit: Waxed dental floss is great. Half a hacksaw blade will cut almost anything. Any sized aluminum foil. Rubber bands for everything. A arrowhead (broadhead), cutting and hunting. Vaseline covered cottonballs. 35mm Canisters for anything.

 

When backpacking, trash compactor bags outlast normal trashbags.

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Dutch Oven Cake

 

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 1/2 cups sugar

1/2 cup cocoa

2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

2/3 cup vegetable oil

2 tablespoons vinegar

1 tablespoon vanilla

2 cups cold coffe (strong)

1/4 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon cinamon

 

Put flour, 1 1/2 cups sugar, cocoa, soda and salt into a cold dutch oven. Stir with a fork to mix. Form 3 wells in the mixture, pour oil into one well, vinegar in one and vanilla in one. Pour cold coffe over all ingredients and stir with fork until well mixed. Do not beat. Combine remaining sugar and cinamon, sprinkle over batter. Bake at a moderate temp. until done (350 deg. F. appx 35 to 40 mins).

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In a ziplock "Freezer" bag combine 2-3 eggs worth of powdered egg, a dash or two of powdered milk, salt and pepper, and any other spices (Onion, garlic, etc) that you like. Carry dry. When it is breakfast time add the appropriate amount of water to re-constitute. Then, measure out enough water for one or two cups of hot chocolate. Bring water to boil and set bag with eggs in the water (don't let the water get into the eggs. Boil until the eggs are the consistancy you like. (a little tabasco or luisianna hotsauce is a great condiment). Use the boiled water for a cup or two of hot cocoa and you have a great trailworthy meal.

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By the way, Ziplocks are great for almost any meal that is "just add hot water. Make it in the bag, eat it from the bag and when it is gone...clean-up consists of turning the bag inside out and licking it clean. Great for oatmeal. I've even seen some folks tear out a corner of the bag and suck the food out. I prefer to re-use the bags. They are not so great for VERY wet foods like soup. But they do minute rice like nobodies business.

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I like to use the ziplock bag with the plastic thermal mug for cooking those freeze dried meals. Just put the bag inside the mug, add your ingredients and put the cover back on for a few minutes. Same clean up as Weekender.

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For Flint and Steel kits see...

 

http://www.trackofthewolf.com

 

Remember, with flint and steel the char cloth must be placed on top of the flint. Sparks fly up and across the flint, not downward and out. Hold the charcloth with your thumb, this way you've got something to aim at with the striker. Also, the thumb will deflect the sparks backwards and onto the cloth....

 

 

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For wide stream crossings where there's a bit of a risk for getting the pack and gear drenched consider using a coricle...mine, instead of being circular have the shape of a short bread loaf...to make,

use a level area and cut stakes to form an inner and outer ring about 8 to 12 inches deep. Fill with branches, weaving and crossing whenever possible to height of about 18 to 20 inches. Wrap with cord to secure, and remove the stakes. Lay a few spars across by pushing them through the fill for decking. Flip over onto a tarp, or the rain fly of a tent securing with cord. Done right you'll have a nice little boat to float your gear, or sometimes yourself across a span of water....

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I have found many uses for kite string. Strong, comes on easily stored holder. Useful for sewing, frapping rope, liteweight fish line, floss, etc. Also, carry small amount of contruction warning tape, last used on overnight when it was discovered that we were camping in a just opened hunting area. Tied to boys backpacks made them very visible, bells on packs helped also, hunters complained all the way out of the area.

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Speaking of bells

I heard of a guy who went to Colorado to go backpacking but was afraid of the possibility of running into bears. The game warden assured him that it was unlikely for him to have any trouble but said that if he ran into a brown bear he should stand as tall as he could and try to look ferocious. He said there were also a few grizzlies in the area and gave him some little bells to put on his shoes. He said the bears would hear the bells and leave the area. Well, what if a grizzly doesnt leave and I come face to face with one, the hiker asked. The warden told him just to lay down and play dead and the bear should go away. The other thing you need to know said the warden, is how to identify bear droppings. He said the brown bears droppings were medium sizedbigger than deer or coyote, but smaller than grizzly. The hiker said, but how do I identify Grizzly droppings? Oh, thats easy, said the warden, itll be a large pileand it normally has little bells in it.

 

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In the Adirondacks those "bear" bells are sometimes referred as dinner bells for bears. A bell is an unnatural sound in the woods and often lures a curious bear to take a look. If they do look, they might get a full meal wrapped in a backpack. I still like whistles, they can scare the heck out of a bear and help with lost scouters, scouts don't get lost, we just don't know where THEY are. Bells in the woods might say "Taco Bell" to the hungry bear.

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I can't say anything about the usefulness of whistles when you are lost since I've never been lost...I was bewildered once for 3 days...but never lost ;)

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Weekender, THANK YOU!!! After a long day your post was just what I needed and gave me a new scoutmaster minute.

 

When cooking a turkey on an overnight insert aluminum tent pegs into the body of the bird. This gives you strong attachment points to hang the bird while cooking and decreases the time it takes to cook it.

 

Keep them coming.

 

YIS

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Can't believe this all i can get from the wealth of knowledge out there. Come on give me what you have learned. It mey be old to you but may be new to me and those reading. Old dogs stil need to learn.

YIS

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