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Shriscov

Perception of interpreter strip

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I am about to be recognized for speaking Spanish with an interpreter strip and I've not seen it ever on a Scouter or Scout. I am just curious for anonymous input on what impression it makes.

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That's great that you speak another language and can wear the interpreter strip. I have not seen the strip on any scouts, but have seen it on many scouters.

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It tells folks that you can carry on a meaningful conversation in that language, that you can translate as needed for another person, and that you can read and write in that language.

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Interpreter strips for many Americans are hard things to earn, so you don't see many folks wear them. Plus many folks don't even know about them. I bought a Francaise(sp) strip for my wife who was an adjunct in French at one time.

 

BUT I've seen them worn by both youth and adults. I remember having to order 2 Cantonese strips for a new DL and her son.

 

Thinking about it I know several folks who would qualify for the Vietnamese strip, don't wear it.

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Ok this reminds me of a joke I heard when I was staffing a scout camp in the European Camp Staff Program.

 

What do you call someone who speaks two languiages....bilingual.

How about someone who speaks three languages.......trilingual.

What about someone who only speaks one language................................................................................................................................

 

 

 

 

.... an Englishman ;)

 

From the monolingual EAGLE92

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That is a good joke. I just wondered if there was some perception attached to the strip, since I know someone who qualifies that didn't get one.

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As a scout and Explorer, I wore the "Deutsch" strip, having taken German in high school through fifth year. I was semi-fluent at one time. I can still read German passably, but I no longer wear it, because my German is so rusty, I would just get quickly embarrassed. And most European kids speak English better than our kids do.

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Does the individual even know about it? Sometimes the question of whether a person gets an award or not is whethter is know about it, or if they get nominated. A great example would be a person I work with, who for several years was responsible for this major award banquet. Long story short, everyone thought sh had already received it when she had never been nominated for it.

 

We took care of that.

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Eagle92

I suppose you might call an American, someone who has never mastered English??

Ea.

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Eamonn, how many time do I have to tell you speaking English is illegal in many places in the USA?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***The official language is AMERICAN:)***

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E,

I just tell them how I've been told, and that one came form some Dutch scouts if memory serves. Although it could equally apply to Americans, as I noted in my sig at the end, Canadians (excepting the Quebecois), and Aussies.

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I never thought of the strip as an "award" to be given someone...if you're qualified, go buy one and wear it. I think most people don't wear it, because they don't know about it.

 

Boys and adults may wear this strip if they show their knowledge of a foreign language or the sign language for the hearing impaired by:

 

1.Carrying on a five-minute conversation in this language.

2.Translating a two-minute speech or address.

3.Writing a letter in the language (does not apply for sign language).

4.Translating 200 words from the written word.

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My daughter can read and write in a form "elvish". Tolkien who wrote " Lord of the Rings" was considered to be a linguist and made up the languages spoken by the characters in the " Lord of the Rings" If a scout was skilled in reading and writing in these languages, I wonder if he would qualify for this patch. ;0)(This message has been edited by crossramwedge)

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Well I have seen KLINGON interpreter strips, and yes there is a Klingon to English dictionary

 

http://www.amazon.com/Klingon-Dictionary-Star-Trek/dp/067174559X

 

Good friend of mine in HS and college was a Treckie, and spoke Klingon fluently. He even tried to get the college to approve Klingon as a foreign language to meet that credit.

 

The college was not amused.(This message has been edited by eagle92)

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Friend of mine bought me the Klingon Interpreter Strip as a joke, but I fear I am not nearly fluent enough to wear it. (taH pagh, taH be)

 

Brooklynese, on the other hand......

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