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cardinal50

Adults wearing uniforms to boost ego?

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I didn't leave it off. What I mean is the limit is 5 but the only way you could fit 5 is if they were all training medals. You can only fit 3 if you wear Eagle, Silver, Ranger, Religious Emblem, etc. due to their larger size.

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deacon,

Aren't the CS leader medals suspended on a ribbon, and therfore don't count towards the five rule as they are worn around the neck? Or have they come out with new CS training medals that are worn over the pocket now?

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The old DLTA and DLCTA were small chest medals like the Scouter's Key. They replaced them in 1988 with the neck medals but those were discontinued in 2001. Now there are only the knots. Neck medals would not count against the chest medal limit but then how many neck medals should one wear without looking ridiculous? I would think two.

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I'm new to the forum & having just read through this thread, I have a couple of questions. As was stated earlier, BSA is a uniformed organization, therefore aren't those adults who are registered entitled to wear the uniform? Also, are not all positions held by adults, whether or not they are in direct contact with the boys important? If not, try running a committee with only a SM & a couple of ASMs. Not alot gets done. Keep in mind that some members may not be able to work with the boys (i.e. able to go on campouts, teach MBs, etc)but their behind the scenes work allows the program to continue. Without these individuals the Troop would flounder quickly. Some members on a committee can put in alot of hours, are they not just as entitled to wear the uniform as someone who is out in front? After all the uniform is worn to support the boys and the program.

 

As far as knots, temp patches, etc., if you've earned them, you have the right to wear them, as long as you wear them correctly! Remember, the uniform represents Scouting and what it stands for, not a display for patches. To me, this is the real issue, that we as Scouters set an example for the boys by wearing the uniform correctly, with the proper patches in their proper places. If we don't wear it right, then how can we expect the boys to do the same.

 

I also feel that the Centennial Circle should be worn by everyone. The best youth organization for boys has reached a milestone of 100 years and we should celebrate it. Doing so with a patch on our uniform is not excess, egotistical, or bling but rather a sense of pride.

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neon,

Welcome to the boards, and congrats on an Eagle on the way!

 

Only problem I discovered with the Ring emblem, besides essentially sewing it twice (i.e. inside and outside loop), is that you are only suppose to wear it for one year. At least that is what the SCOUTSTUFF facebook page is sawing.

 

What I find funny is that when you look up the emblem on scoutstuff.org, it gives you Badge Magic instructions. Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that leave a permanent stain on the uniform? Sorry after my one time use of Badge Bond in the 1990s, the stuff in a can ;( , I said I'll stick to sewing.

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I don't get this train of thought, that we have to be so modest. If you have a uniform wear it. I'd like to see more adults wearing their uniform because it sends the message to the boys. If you've earned awards wear them. If you enjoy earning and then showing off your awards more power to you. Do your best while earning them. Have fun with scouting, it's contagious.

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Deacon,

I must respectfully disagree as i believe the current BSA policy for CS, BS, and Venturing leaders is best; being able to wear all of them IF you want.

 

I admit I got a few unis with all the stuff on, and I got a few with nothing on, including my three most precious awards of Eagle, AOL, and Youth Rel. The knots do represent dedication to scouting, i.e. the various training and service awards, and achievement, the youth awards and a few adult ones.

 

When I became a TCDL, my uniform had all my knots on it, and it was a reassurance to the parents that here was someone who cared about Scouting and the kids, and knew what he was doing (if they only knew that was only two was from the CS program as a youth ;) )

 

The knots and other patches have been used to start conversations and motivate scouts. I've had some great opportunities in Scouting, and I would love for those I work with to have those same opportunities. Telling my 'scouting tales" is something that I love to do, esp. with Webelos getting ready to cross over, beacsue it shows them that with scouting, the possibilities are truly boundless.

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I agree, if the BSA didn't want us to wear anything on the uniform, why do they keep creating more awards that are represented by knots?

Like Andy said on his website, the quote by Casey Stengle

"If you've done it, it ain't bragging"

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I think that the BSA has twice as many knots as it really needs right now. We have a $1000 knot that could just as easily have been a buckle, bolo tie, or some other shiny doo-dad. We have numerous knots for unit organizing, a knot just for buying a life membership in NESA, and don't EVEN get me started on the number of Cub knots floating around out there.

 

If you want to get these uniforms cleaned up, use fewer knots. Use a silver Eagle device for NESA membership, give the big donors a nice bolo tie, use a single organizing knot, again with suitable devices, and streamline the Cub Scout leader recognitions. I don't think that leader recognition would suffer one iota as a result.

 

While we're on the topic of knots, why is there a knot for Silver World when registered BSA members aren't eligible for the award?

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LOL! You mean we get told information incorrectly? LOL!

I asked my DE about that 100 year ring. He in turn contacted ( whoever) at council who called whoever at National and ........anyways,I was told that it is an officail unifrom part and it stays on as long as you want. You do not have to take it off after the 2010 year is over.

 

 

As far as patches and awards/medals/ knots being ego boosting...well, that depends on the individual. All of you know that too!

 

 

See, I took BALOO and wear that patch proudly. No, not a class on a PhD level, but still , it was a class I took because I want to do what I can to have a great program for the boys in our pack. I am proud to have taken that class.

 

Then I EARNED my trained patch. Again, I took the necessary classes to get it. I want to make sure that I at least meet the minimum standard. Not going to stop at that minimum, but it's a starting point.

 

Now, the difference is why you took the class to get those patches: If you took the class in order to be able to use and impliment that info, and in doing so, create a better program...then wear all you want!

 

If you ONLY took the class so you'd have a patch to show of just for the sake of having the patch...well, I'm not impressed. But the funny thing is..most (adults) who might wear the patch just for the bling factor, probably are not in the presence of the boys most of the tike anyway.

 

Just saying, from my point of view....it take a good amount of time and shuffling your schedule , driving here or there, changing your plans , and alot of late suppers to take most of the training and attend meetings in my distric/council.

 

 

There probably ought to be a knot just for doing all that! :)

 

Just kidding! :p

 

 

 

 

 

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The knots and other patches have been used to start conversations...

about ME

 

and motivate scouts...

by showing them how cool I am. (that must be motivating for boys...)

 

Telling my 'scouting tales" is something that I love to do,...

because they're all about ME

 

Yah, I don't mean to be picking on Eagle92, eh? :) And I trust he'll take it in da tongue-in-cheek way it's intended. It's just that whenever I hear those explanations, that's what I think of and see in my head, because I've watched it so many times. Nah, not every adult is like that, and I expect Eagle92 isn't. Besides, such adults are still fine people who do good scoutin'. But most often adults put dewdads on their uniform for attention, and they get attention, which gives 'em a chance to talk about themselves and their awards and their scouting experiences.

 

It's OK. I'd just suggest instead of talking to boys about our adult uniform, that we hush up and spend our time listening to their tales, and interests, and most recent adventure. Maybe ask 'em about their uniform, if they've got somethin' personalized on it, or about an unusual badge they've earned.

 

I just think it's much more productive scoutin' time than talking about ourselves. When we really listen to the lads, we often find they aren't motivated by the same things we are. Their great adventures aren't goin' to be the same as ours were. But if we listen closely and support the boys' goals and dreams with our interest, it works a special magic. That's where things are truly boundless.

 

Beavah

(wonderin' if this will make it through these fancy portable wireless repeater jobbers...)

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Beav,

No problems. You did get me thinking though, and that is a good thing. Yep I talk a lot about scouting and my experiences. I've been very fortunate and have had a bunch. I try my best to be like BP at Brownsea; telling stories of his adventures to inspire youth. This past year I've dealt with one of the most inquisitive age groups: Tigers. I want them to grow physically, mentally, and morally. They want excitement and adventure, yes even at this age. I try to use my stories to inspire them, telling them that there is so much more out there to do, but things go one step at a time.

 

 

But maybe I am over doing it?

 

EDITED: Need to add that you are 100% in that I need to support what they want to do.(This message has been edited by Eagle92)

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Me: Hey, Mr. Scoutmaster, what's that purple and white knot?

SM: That's my International Service Award.

Me: Cool! Tell me about your experiences earning that one?

SM: It all started when I got to lead boys to an international camporee in Mexico-- scouts from 7 different nations were there!

Me: That's cool! I had no idea we had that so close to us!

 

---

 

A knot started this conversation, and we were able to send 3 troops to an international event on our side of the Mexican border this past year. It was amazing and the boys had a great time (despite a few hiccups of course).

 

What's wrong with sharing stories of our involvement? It can serve to inspire others!

 

If you don't like knots, then don't wear them. I wear a Tiger Cub Den leader knot on my venturing uniform. It's the only knot I wear on it. It serves to remind ME that everything I have learned and get to share started with a den of boys no older than 7 years old. The journey we took TOGETHER is a constant reminder to me that we're all about the boys.

 

You don't know what those knots personally mean to someone unless you ask. If it's about ego, then let them handle that with their Id. If it's not, something can be learned.

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