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Diver66

T-Shirt regulating

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I believe that this is a general policy for most coundil camps. Not that all councils are so strictly worded, but most do have it. Our own council words it as "If camp t-shirt is not worn, a Scouting related t-shirt should be worn." Our own troop chooses to set a policy of full-uniform or troop t-shirt with with uniform shorts at camps. Our pack is more leanient, using the council guideline that full Uniform, camp, or scouting related (unit, old camp or such) related t-shirt should be worn.

 

Most likely the "National policy" statement comes from someone's interpretation of National's actual policy that Councils and Units are not to have advertisements or commercial endorsements on Scouting material. Specifically websites and publications, but I am sure that National would also include clothing, etc. You will find that many people, especially council volunteers, like to use that "National policy" phrase. While not wearing anything with advertising to camp is not a National policy, the local councils are free to set up more restrictive rules and guidelines, just as your unit is.(This message has been edited by pack212scouter)

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The policy cited is exactly what the national policy is for those attending the National Scout Jamboree. Tshirt's must be scout related, like troop, camp, camporee type or a plain color shirt.

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We tell them to do this as a matter of course some of them have lots of shirts from staffing day camps and buying camp shirts. A lot of the older ones just buy a 5 pack of white undershirts and throw them away after a days wear. I am beginning to see the sense of this. T shirts from favorite bands or other things can be costly and hard to replace if lunch is on you in the dining hall. Summer camp is not the place to show off your best duds.

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"A lot of the older ones just buy a 5 pack of white undershirts and throw them away after a days wear. I am beginning to see the sense of this."

 

The wasteful habits exhibited in this country are abominable. I think I'll go read "The Rise & Fall of the Roman Empire" to see where we're headed.

 

A Scout is thrifty.

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I would think the reason for having the policy stated that way is that it would make what is and what is not acceptable black and white. Using terms like "appropriate" only leaves too much up for interpertation and makes it easier to communciate the expectations and enforce.

 

It would seem to me there must have been problems with what had been worn at the camp and maybe previous attempts to communicate what was appropriate fell on deaf ears. Especially if some troops made sure the "rule" was followed only to come to camp to see other troops disregarding the rule.

 

Seems to me the easiest way to control the situation.

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"Seems to me the easiest way to control the situation."

This might be very true?

But....

As an organization that spends so much time on trying to get youth to make ethical choices, is the easiest way to control the situation the best way?

Ea.

 

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Another ridiculous policy focusing energy on the wrong issues.

 

Having son in his first year of Boy Scouting, I can tell you flat out he doesnt have a week's worth of BSA t-shirts and I'm not buying him that many up front at the outrageous pricing the BSA charges for their stuff. If they force me, I will make sure and deduct the cost from my next years FOS donation.

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Another ridiculous policy focusing energy on the wrong issues.

 

Having son in his first year of Boy Scouting, I can tell you flat out he doesnt have a week's worth of BSA t-shirts and I'm not buying him that many up front at the outrageous pricing the BSA charges for their stuff. If they force me, I will make sure and deduct the cost from my next years FOS donation.

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Another ridiculous policy focusing energy on the wrong issues.

 

Having son in his first year of Boy Scouting, I can tell you flat out he doesnt have a week's worth of BSA t-shirts and I'm not buying him that many up front at the outrageous pricing the BSA charges for their stuff. If they force me, I will make sure and deduct the cost from my next years FOS donation.(This message has been edited by erickelly65)

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"I was informed at our troop meeting that a Scout can only wear Scout t-shirts or plain (no writing on them) at camp. They can not wear anything that has advertising on it, I understand vulgar or offensive t-shirts."

 

"Another ridiculous policy focusing energy on the wrong issues."

 

What "policy" are you referring to?? We already established that stuff heard at a troop meeting does not constitute BSA policy. Where did you get the idea that anybody was going to force you to buy a week's worth of BSA t-shirts? Surely you're not arguing for the right to wear obscene t-shirts?

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erickelly65,

I don't think it's so ridiculous. Like the uniform in the first, it removes distinction by social status or class. PLUS, who wants to replace a name brand shirt when Johnny messes it up at camp. With the red clay "soil" here in the South, it is almost impossible to remove the dirt stains from clothing.

 

I don't like the image set forth by someone wearing a Dale Earnheart jr shirt advertising Budweiser. How about Mark Martin and Viagra? Just wear a plain shirt or scout oriented shirt.

 

I've gone to the scout shop and bought previous year's camp shirt on sale, usually $4 or $5 each.

 

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FScouter

"We" havent established anything. At this point, we dont for sure know whether this was in fact bad info from a volunteer,a unit policy, a camp policy, a council policy etc. Nor do we know if it isnt policy anywhere either.

 

In fact, this isnt policy for my Council, I was speaking to the initial post from Diver66. However, it wouldn't be a suprise if some of the leadership in my council pushed for such an approach.

 

You asked where I got the idea someone would force me to buy BSA shirts. Well if it was, in fact, a policy (Be it at the Unit, Council or National level), to keep within policy it would make sense that I would need to provide my son with a week's worth of BSA appropriate attire. We dont have enough BSA wear at home ergo I would need to buy it.(This message has been edited by erickelly65)(This message has been edited by erickelly65)

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Gonzo1

I say ridiculous in the sense that in the order of priorities it shouldnt be on the radar screen. (At this point we dont know that it is in fact a policy anywhere)

 

I do agree with you on the uniform being an equalizer but at what cost. I am involved in a district with many low-income scouts and them putting together even a single complete uniform is a stretch.

 

As for inappropriate messages on shirts, I agree there should be a standard but prohibiting all non-bsa wear isnt the best answer in my opinion.

(This message has been edited by erickelly65)

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"I agree there should be a standard but prohibiting all non-bsa wear isnt the best answer in my opinion."

 

Ageed. That would not be a good answer. I cannot even fathom any camp or council prohibiting all non-BSA clothing. Fortunately, there is no such BSA prohibition. I doubt any camp or council anywhere in the country has a non-BSA prohibition, and it has not even been presented as an suggestion anywhere is this topic.

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I alway wore my summer camp t-shirts to school - both in Jr. High and High School - never had anyone have an issue with that. Why, then, should a camp have a problem with a lad wearing a school related t-shirt - sports team, band, theater, etc. - to camp?

 

I'm reminded that the first point of the Scout Law is "A Scout is Trustworthy". What does such a policy say to Scouts and their parents about being trustworthy if camps aren't willing to trust that Scouts (and their parents) won't bring inappropriate t-shirts to camp unless told not too?

 

Jamboree is a different animal in this discussion - the t-shirt policy at Jamboree is all about image and marketing for an event that is A) open to visitors pretty much all the time, and B) has a lot of media around. Not the same environment as a local council summer camp at all.

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