Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Xyzzy

Flag optional on uniform?

Recommended Posts

Belayer_StLouis is correct. I did some research

http://www.usflag.org/uscode36.html

http://www.flagsbay.com/flag/brief-history-of-the-united-states-flag-code/

The statute numbering seems to have changed some but here is the summary

 

Congress passed Public Law 77-826; chapter 806 the U.S. Flag in Dec 22, 1942. It has be amended three times since. In 1976, Section 176 which deals with Respect to Flag, part (j) was amended.

 

"However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen, and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart."

 

So prior to 1976, the US flag could not have been worn on a scout uniform.

Why did this change? Not sure - draw attention to bicentennial year, U.S. astronaut spacesuits had a U.S. flag, raise spirits after Vietnam, Watergate, Gas Shortage, ??? Now why the flag patch is not placed on the left sleeve so as to be closer to the heart, I do not know either.

 

Xyzzy

Sounds like you are teaching your son to be leader. If we didn't question the rules, we would all still be doing the Bellamy salute for the Pledge of Allegiance. Oh, thank you service and the comfort that you gave to our servicemen and their families, that's a hard detail. You had some other points/questions, good ones:

1. Wearing the flag is disrespectful. I agree, what a flood gate that change opened. I wonder if one wears a scout uniform at night, does one shine a light on one's right sleeve?

2. Maybe family, God, country?

3. How many countries wear their flag? I suggest we send you to the next World Jamboree in Sweden and report back. I do know that Australia wears a flag patch not on their sleeve but next to the purple World Brotherhood patch above the left pocket (close to heart). I think France does not wear a flag patch but a country symbol patch. Sorry not much help on that one.

4. Why did BSA change?

5. An uncluttered uniform - you would have liked the 50's and 60's, well at least the uniform we wore back then. Our uniform was even "green" and isn't that a good thing these days.

 

We repeat the Pledge and Scout Oath/Law ad infinitum but marriage vows once. Repetition is a teaching device, maybe it will improve the chances that they think about the words. I ask my scouts to say the words slowly in the hopes that they will consider the words. Maybe.

 

Teaching your son to ask questions is good, teaching him to find answers is better.

 

 

"That is not "blindly going along" with something. That is following the rules of the organization you belong to." Was that line from Dr. Strangelove?

 

My two cents

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the replies. The information about the older uniforms is interesting. I know the old days were not as perfect as they seem in the Norman Rockwell paintings, but I know in my mind that I associate the old days with those images.

 

 

 

Posted by OldGreyEagle:

 

"On the other hand, if you want to draw attention to yourself and how you feel and what you have done, this is a perfect way to do it, but be honest, you want a celebration of yourself pure and simple."

 

 

 

I'm not sure how to reply to that statement. Certainly, my goal is to not draw attention to myself. I waited weeks before posting this question in the hopes that I could find the answer myself. In my scouting duties I want to be transparent. I want to be remembered at "that guy" who guided scouts towards making ethical and moral decisions in their life, and I want those scouts to know that the thought process and decision they made was their own. I do this by listening and facilitating and not by saying that we do things just because we are supposed to. Everything has a reason. Every decision has consequences. Not making a decision is making a decision. That kind of stuff.

 

Proper uniforming is important to me. I am proud to be a scouter. I had always wanted to be a scout as a youth but was never afforded that opportunity. Wearing the uniform is an honor for me, and I wear it to every scouting function I attend. I can only hope that my uniforming practice rubs off on some of the scouts and scouters i associate with who think wearing the uniform is dorky or too expensive or too much of a hassle. I have seen scouts staple patches on their uniform. How can I convince that scout to sew it on properly? Jumping all over him about it isn't proper. Having his mother sew it for him doesn't teach him to be independent. Paying a sewing service to sew a patch isn't thrifty. A needle and some thread doesn't cost but a few dollars. A whip stitch is easily learned. Yes, it takes time, but anything worth doing is worth doing right. Now if I'm not willing to sew my own patches how can I expect to lead by example? So I sew them myself. Is this extreme? I don't know. Is it corny? Perhaps.

 

If not wearing the flag is wrong, I will change my practice. I'll email or call the national office for further clarification. I was told in a private email that there is a memo from 2001 that states that no scout nor scouter should be mandated or told that the flag emblem is a required item which must be worn. Maybe this is the documentation I am looking for.

 

Is this minor issue worth all this angst? It is for me. The little details add up over time. The intention of the rule is just as important to me as the rule itself. Perhaps there is a valuable lesson to be learned in all this. Perhaps I am totally wrong. If so, I will learn from this and the experience will enable me to become a better mentor. Just following a rule is taking the easy way out. Understanding why we follow a rule and then following it is, in my opinion, what we should be striving for.

 

Even though I have a pretty decent medical background, for years I did not wear a seat belt, even after it became the law. So my son wonders to me one day why I don't wear it. I could have started wearing it and told him I wear it because it is the law. Instead, I started wearing it and explained how a seat belt works and how it can save your life in a crash. I think that he might be more willing to wear his seat belt understanding the "why" than "just because". The funny thing is the reason I didn't wear my seat belt up until then was because I viewed it as a hassle. It was for a few weeks, but now it is second nature. I guess an old dog can learn new tricks.

 

I spent many years without a moral or ethical compass. I have made numerous bad decisions. I feel it is very important to teach my son to learn from the mistakes I have made. Sometimes I fail him, and he makes a mistake that I should have been able to teach him to avoid, and he learns the hard way. Maybe learning the hard way is sometimes more effective? It hurts me to see him make these mistakes but I understand this is a part of growing up. I didn't receive a manual when he was born, so I am using my scouting manuals instead. I learned early on that just yelling at him, while successful for a few minutes, doesn't really change anything. Reasoning with him has been a real breakthrough and I thank scouting for teaching me to how do this.

 

Every day is a new opportunity to improve myself. I look back at the things I thought and wrote just a few years ago and I don't recognize that person any more. Will I do the same in a few years looking back at today? I sure hope so. Life sure would be boring if there was nothing to look forward to, and personal growth and learning sure is exciting.

 

Then again, perhaps the purpose of my life is to serve as a warning for others.

 

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do I say the Pledge of Allegiance whenever the opportunity presents itself? This is a story I share with our Scouts, especially when they might not be as respectful as they should. I remind our Scouts to remember Mike Christian.

 

The Story of Mike Christian,Vietnam POW

The American Flag symbolizes the hope and inspiration that is the essence of everyone and everything in the US. There is another story that epitomizes the emotion and pride every American feels for the flag, and underscores the importance of the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

The Vietnam War . . . 1971, prisoners of war were moved from isolation into large rooms at the Hanoi Hilton. One of those prisoners was Mike Christian. Mike came from a small town near Selma, Alabama. He didn't wear a pair of shoes until he was thirteen. At seventeen he enlisted in the Navy, later to earn a commission and become a Naval flying officer, and was shot down and captured in 1967.

 

The uniforms the Americans wore were the Vietnamese pajamas, only they were blue, and rubber sandals made of automobile tires.

 

Mike contrived a bamboo needle for himself and collecting some cloth of red and white, he sewed an American Flag on the inside of his shirt. And it was the practice of the prisoners that every afternoon before they got their ration of soup, they would hang Mike's shirt on the wall and recite the Pledge of Allegiance. Now, repeating the Pledge of Allegiance may not be the most important part of the average American day, but for those men in that stark prison cell, it was the most important and meaningful event of their day.

 

One day, the Vietnamese searched the cell and discovered Mike's shirt with the flag sewn inside, removed it and him, and for the "benefit" of the other prisoners beat Mike Christian severely for the next couple hours.

 

Then they opened the door and threw him back inside. Mike was not in good shape and the others tried to comfort and take care of him as best they could.

 

The cell had a concrete slab on which the men slept and a naked light bulb in each corner of the room. After things had quieted down for the evening, in the corner of the room, sitting beneath that dimly lit bulb with a piece of white cloth, a piece of red cloth, another blue shirt and his bamboo needle, was Mike Christian. His eyes almost swollen shut from the beating, he was fashioning another American flag.

 

Mike Christian was not making that flag because it made him feel better. He was making that flag because he knew how important it was for his fellow prisoners to be able to pledge allegiance to our Flag and to our country.

 

For Mike Christian, maintaining that Flag was the right thing to do.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so, I'm new to these forum things.... And not sure if I will continue to read them either seeing as how some of these people here are not here for all the right reasons. And I would have to also question their dedication to the organization. However, The Boy Scouts of America is an organization that is not mandatory to belong to here in the United States. So to be a member you need to meet certain criteria, just as any organization had rules for being a member. If you do not meet these criteria, or you do not believe in what they stand for you can not join and should not want to join. I have been a Scout for 20 years. Being a Scout is not a Right, it is a privilege. And if you talk about not wanting to wear a Flag of The United States of America, for which you should be proud to have the privilege to wear, then maybe your should not be in this organization. I know if I had anything to do with it you most likely would not be. Moreover if you want to wear a Flag of another country on your uniform, Move to That Country, this is the Boy Scouts of AMERICA. You should only be so Proud to wear the flag of your country and everything it stands for. I have said enough. I hope. And I was sorry to read all of this non-sense on here. This whole forum is rather controversial if you ask me. Nothing stated here is meant to hurt anyones feelings, but maybe should stir some thoughts.

 

Good Day

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forums, hamer82! We hope you'll stick around and share your experiences as a 20-year Scouter. To be sure, some of the discussion threads toss around controversial ideas (especally in the issues and politics forum). However, this is a also place to be helpful to lots of folks who are new to scouting. I've been involved in scouting since 1954 and I'm still learning things from these forums. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The flag is provided on the uniform. You are right in many facts. The old uniforms did not have it on there. Why did we change it. Why did the Army go to wearing the flag with the Army Combat Uniform.

 

There is always going to be change in this world. There is always gonna be people who complain.

 

I am sorry, I believe in one thing, if there is a standard for the uniform, then there should be a standard across the board without alterations. Example, FLAG OR NO FLAG. THAT IS THAT.

 

Of course the combat veteran (Yes I was a Medic Too) I would like to see the flag on the uniform. All of my Cubs look the same.

 

As for the Pledge of Allegience. There are requirements for the ranks that require the Cub Scouts to understand the Pledge and take part in a Flag ceremony. I have my Wolf Cub giving the "I AM YOUR FLAG" presentation. WE need to make sure that OUR children understand these thing. The Schools cannot teach everything.

 

That is my opinion. Not those of my Cubs or the BSA. Agree with me or disagree, that is your RIGHT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having been a Cub Scout from 1971-1973 and a Scout from 1973 to 1980, I recall that the American flag was added to the Cub Scout uniform the year after I graduated to Scouting. I recall younger boys in my school wearing it above one of the pockets on the front of the shirt. When I joined Scouting, at first the only badge on the right sleeve was the red and black patrol medallion. When I bought additional shirts to go to the Jamboree in 1977, I had to have the American Flag patch above the Patrol medallion. I think the Scout Handbooks make it clear; starting the the special bicentennial edition of the eighth edition (with the Csatari painting "All Out for Scouting" on the cover), the flag is there on the right shoulder as proper wear. The ninth edition, which I had to use the last year of Scouting, also shows clearly that the American Flag patch was required wear.

 

I think the 1978 version of the uniform inspection sheet allowed Scouts who had pre-flag uniforms to be "grandfathered" in without penalty.

 

I was also on camp staff, so I had multiple uniforms for work. Since my mother had given up on keeping up with the sewing, it was left for me to do it by hand. I remember the extremely heavy plastic backing on those flags made it near impossible to attach it, but I did. My guess was that since the flag is universal for all scouts, that someone came up with the idea of attaching them at the factory. For which I must say, I am grateful, as it is one less badge to sew on.

 

By the way, I attended the World Jamboree this past year, and most Scout organizations wear their flag proudly somewhere. I don't see any problem in having a flag patch on the uniform (it is not the same as a flag and is not subject to the same disposal rules).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just had to add my 2 cents. I was a proud scout in the mid 70's. My uniform had the Flag patch on it. I was proud to wear it not just as a symbol of patriotism but because my dad wore one on his uniform (Firefighter) he was also a vietnam veteran. (Airforce). I am now a Firefighter and wear a flag pin on my shirt. My basebal hat comes with a small flag on it as does my sweatshirt. I have an american flag on the back of my helmet. I wear these flags proudly not just to show my patriotism but to show support for those around the world that are protecting my freedom from threat both foriegn and domestic. My Brotherinlaw being one of them. So I feel it is important for the scouts to wear the flag and be made aware of its importance beyond the generic patriotism.

 

A more important question should be why the flag on a BSA uniform is being flow the wrong way.please read the following.

 

What is the proper way to wear a flag patch on one's shoulder sleeve?

 

Left Flag

Right or "reversed field" flag

 

 

General David Petraeus To wear our country's flag properly, the field of stars is worn closest to your heart. Further, when worn on the sleeve of a military uniform, the flag should appear to be advancing and not retreating. Thus, if your patch is to be worn on your LEFT sleeve, use a left flag (normal). For patches worn on your RIGHT sleeve, use a "right" or "reversed field" flag.

 

Since the Flag Rules do not specifically address the positioning of the patch, a decision is left to the discretion of the organization prescribing the wear. Some elect to use the "left" flag on both sleeves. [Note: many states and cities have ordinances pertaining to the use of the flag; you may wish to contact the Attorney General of your state or the City Attorney's office regarding this matter.] If you are planning to wear only one patch, it is recommended that you wear a "left" flag on your left sleeve.

 

Military guidelines specify that in support of joint or multi-national operations (as in Iraq), the "right" flag is worn on the right sleeve (see picture), 1/4" below the shoulder seam or 1/8" below any required unit patches. (Class A uniform excepted.)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea what your point is or even if you have one. DoD rules apply to the DoD, BSA rules apply to the BSA. Oddly and thankfully, the DoD does not make the rules or laws for civilians.

 

The Army could chose to wear purple and orange polka dotted flags but that would make it neither right nor proper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The flag as being "optional" is now a moot point as the new uniforms have a permanate almost plastic flag adhearedto the shirt. I like an embrodered patch. This seems to feel fake (or cheap) to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The flag as being "optional" is now a moot point as the new uniforms have a permanate almost plastic flag adhearedto the shirt. I like an embrodered patch. This seems to feel fake (or cheap) to me."

 

That's because your patriotism is now imported.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An important distinction that should be made that I think many are missing - their is no flag on the BSA uniform. There is a flag emblem - a big difference. As such, it is not treated the same as the US Flag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is also important to note that the flag in any form, whether it be a flag, patch, or postal stamp, THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE, THEY ARE ALL TO BE TREATED THE SAME. Well, at least in the U.S. Flag Code ("FC")it says so. What we do in our own lives has no bearing on the the FC. The first use of the flag in means other than as a flag was with the US Post Office who had major concerns about cancelling the stamp of the US flag, and/or people throwing the stamps in the garbage after use. We have long since become insensitive to such issues and are basically immune to any flag respect in our nation to the use of the flag. Even those who are supposed to be aware of the FC, very few actually are. I watch flag ceremonies performed all over by assumedly knowledgable groups such as BSA and I have no idea where they find the information they make up.

 

Stating the flag patch is different than the flag is one such "rule" I've never heard before.

 

The FC is on-line, easily found and is available to every US citizen. It would be beneficial if scout leaders would teach the FC rather than questionable local traditions and customs.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"That's because your patriotism is now imported."

 

All together now!

 

Arise! All who refuse to be slaves!

Let our flesh and blood become our new Great Wall!

As the Chinese nation faces its greatest peril,

All forcefully expend their last cries.

Arise! Arise! Arise!

Our million hearts beat as one,

Brave the enemy's fire, March on!

Brave the enemy's fire, March on!

March on! March on! On!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is also important to note that the flag in any form, whether it be a flag, patch, or postal stamp, THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE, THEY ARE ALL TO BE TREATED THE SAME. Well, at least in the U.S. Flag Code ("FC")it says so.

 

Please enlighten me on this subject. I have found many web sites that state similar claims (usually referencing section 3) but I can't find it in the flag code myself. Maybe I'm just dense?

 

United States Code Title 4 Chapter 1 The Flag

1. Flag; stripes and stars on

The flag of the United States shall be thirteen horizontal stripes, alternate red and white; and the union of the flag shall be forty-eight stars [Note that sec. 2 which follows provides for additional stars. Today the flag has fifty stars representing the fifty states Webmaster], white in a blue field

 

2. Same; additional stars

On the admission of a new State into the Union one star shall be added to the union of the flag; and such addition shall take effect on the fourth day of July then next succeeding such admission

 

3. Use of flag for advertising purposes; mutilation of flag

Any person who, within the District of Columbia, in any manner, for exhibition or display, shall place or cause to be placed any word, figure, mark, picture, design, drawing, or any advertisement of any nature upon any flag, standard, colors, or ensign of the United States of America; or shall expose or cause to be exposed to public view any such flag, standard, colors, or ensign upon which shall have been printed, painted, or otherwise placed, or to which shall be attached, appended, affixed, or annexed any word, figure, mark, picture, design, or drawing, or any advertisement of any nature; or who, within the District of Columbia, shall manufacture, sell, expose for sale, or to public view, or give away or have in possession for sale, or to be given away or for use for any purpose, any article or substance being an article of merchandise, or a receptacle for merchandise or article or thing for carrying or transporting merchandise, upon which shall have been printed, painted, attached, or otherwise placed a representation of any such flag, standard, colors, or ensign, to advertise, call attention to, decorate, mark, or distinguish the article or substance on which so placed shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine not exceeding $100 or by imprisonment for not more than thirty days, or both, in the discretion of the court. The words "flag, standard, colors, or ensign", as used herein, shall include any flag, standard, colors, ensign, or any picture or representation of either, or of any part or parts of either, made of any substance or represented on any substance, of any size evidently purporting to be either of said flag, standard, colors, or ensign of the United States of America or a picture or a representation of either, upon which shall be shown the colors, the stars and the stripes, in any number of either thereof, or of any part or parts of either, by which the average person seeing the same without deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag, colors, standard, or ensign of the United States of America.

 

4. Pledge of allegiance to the flag; manner of delivery

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.", should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute. [see Congressional Notes re use of "under God."]

 

5. Display and use of flag by civilians; codification of rules and customs; definition

The following codification of existing rules and customs pertaining to the display and use of the flag of the United States of America be, and it is hereby, established for the use of such civilians or civilian groups or organizations as may not be required to conform with regulations promulgated by one or more executive departments of the Government of the United States. The flag of the United States for the purpose of this chapter shall be defined according to title 4, United States Code, Chapter 1, Section 1 and Section 2 and Executive Order 10834 issued pursuant thereto.

 

6. Time and occasions for display

It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed twenty-four hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.

The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously.

The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.

The flag should be displayed on all days, especially on

New Year's Day, January 1

Inauguration Day, January 20

Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, third Monday in January

Lincoln's Birthday, February 12

Washington's Birthday, third Monday in February

Easter Sunday (variable)

Mother's Day, second Sunday in May

Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May

Memorial Day (half-staff until noon), the last Monday in May

Flag Day, June 14

Father's Day, third Sunday in June

Independence Day, July 4

Labor Day, first Monday in September

Constitution Day, September 17

Columbus Day, second Monday in October

Navy Day, October 27

Veterans Day, November 11

Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November

Christmas Day, December 25

and such other days as may be proclaimed by the President of the United States

the birthdays of States (date of admission)

and on State holidays.

 

The flag should be displayed daily on or near the main administration building of every public institution.

The flag should be displayed in or near every polling place on election days.

The flag should be displayed during school days in or near every schoolhouse.

7. Position and manner of display

The flag, when carried in a procession with another flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is, the flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of the center of that line.

 

The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade except from a staff, or as provided in subsection (i) of this section.

The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the flag is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the chassis or clamped to the right fender.

No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of America, except during church services conducted by naval chaplains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy. No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any other national or international flag equal, above, or in a position of superior prominence or honor to, or in place of, the flag of the United States at any place within the United States or any Territory or possession thereof: Provided, That nothing in this section shall make unlawful the continuance of the practice heretofore followed of displaying the flag of the United Nations in a position of superior prominence or honor, and other national flags in positions of equal prominence or honor, with that of the flag of the United States at the headquarters of the United Nations.

The flag of the United States of America, when it is displayed with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should be on the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should be in front of the staff of the other flag.

The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped and displayed from staffs.

When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of societies are flown on the same halyard with the flag of the United States, the latter should always be at the peak. When the flags are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United States should be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag or pennant may be placed above the flag of the United States or to the United States flag's right.

When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation in time of peace.

When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, balcony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff. When the flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building.

When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window, the flag should be displayed in the same way, with the union or blue field to the left of the observer in the street.

When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street.

When used on a speaker's platform, the flag, if displayed flat, should be displayed above and behind the speaker. When displayed from a staff in a church or public auditorium, the flag of the United States of America should hold the position of superior prominence, in advance of the audience, and in the position of honor at the clergyman's or speaker's right as he faces the audience. Any other flag so displayed should be placed on the left of the clergyman or speaker or to the right of the audience.

The flag should form a distinctive feature of the ceremony of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never be used as the covering for the statue or monument.

The flag, when flown at half-staff, should be first hoisted to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day. On Memorial Day the flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon only, then raised to the top of the staff. By order of the President, the flag shall be flown at half-staff upon the death of principal figures of the United States Government and the Governor of a State, territory, or possession, as a mark of respect to their memory. In the event of the death of other officials or foreign dignitaries, the flag is to be displayed at half-staff according to Presidential instructions or orders, or in accordance with recognized customs or practices not inconsistent with law. In the event of the death of a present or former official of the government of any State, territory, or possession of the United States, or the death of a member of the Armed Forces from any State, territory, or possession who dies while serving on active duty, the Governor of that State, territory, or possession may proclaim that the National flag shall be flown at half-staff, and the same authority is provided to the Mayor of the District of Columbia with respect to present or former officials of the District of Columbia and members of the Armed Forces from the District of Columbia. The flag shall be flown at half-staff 30 days from the death of the President or a former President; 10 days from the day of death of the Vice President, the Chief Justice or a retired Chief Justice of the United States, or the Speaker of the House of Representatives; from the day of death until interment of an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, a Secretary of an executive or military department, a former Vice President, or the Governor of a State, territory, or possession; and on the day of death and the following day for a Member of Congress. The flag shall be flown at half-staff on Peace Officers Memorial Day, unless that day is also Armed Forces Day. As used in this subsection

the term "half-staff" means the position of the flag when it is one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff;

the term "executive or military department" means any agency listed under sections 101 and 102 of title 5, United States Code; and

the term "Member of Congress" means a Senator, a Representative, a Delegate, or the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico.

When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. The flag should not be lowered into the grave or allowed to touch the ground.

When the flag is suspended across a corridor or lobby in a building with only one main entrance, it should be suspended vertically with the union of the flag to the observer's left upon entering. If the building has more than one main entrance, the flag should be suspended vertically near the center of the corridor or lobby with the union to the north, when entrances are to the east and west or to the east when entrances are to the north and south. If there are entrances in more than two directions, the union should be to the east.

8. Respect for flag

No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor.

 

The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.

The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.

The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping the front of the platform, and for decoration in general.

The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way.

The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.

The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature.

The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.

The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown.

No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen, and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.

The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning

9. Conduct during hoisting, lowering or passing of flag

During the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the flag or when the flag is passing in a parade or in review, all persons present in uniform should render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute. All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Citizens of other countries present should stand at attention. All such conduct toward the flag in a moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes.

 

10. Modification of rules and customs by President

Any rule or custom pertaining to the display of the flag of the United States of America, set forth herein, may be altered, modified, or repealed, or additional rules with respect thereto may be prescribed, by the Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, whenever he deems it to be appropriate or desirable; and any such alteration or additional rule shall be set forth in a proclamation

 

United States Code Title 36

301. National anthem; Star-Spangled Banner

The composition consisting of the words and music known as The Star-Spangled Banner is designated the national anthem of the United States of America.

 

Conduct during playing During rendition of the national anthem

when the flag is displayed

all present except those in uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart;

men not in uniform should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold the headdress at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; and

individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note; and

when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.

302. National motto

"In God we trust" is the national motto.

 

303. National floral emblem

The flower commonly known as the rose is the national floral emblem.

 

304. National march

The composition by John Philip Sousa entitled "The Stars and Stripes Forever" is the national march.

 

901. Service flag and service lapel button

Individuals Entitled To Display Service Flag. A service flag approved by the Secretary of Defense may be displayed in a window of the place of residence of individuals who are members of the immediate family of an individual serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged.

Individuals Entitled To Display Service Lapel Button. A service lapel button approved by the Secretary may be worn by members of the immediate family of an individual serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged.

License To Manufacture and Sell Service Flags and Service Lapel Buttons. Any person may apply to the Secretary for a license to manufacture and sell the approved service flag, or the approved service lapel button, or both. Any person that manufactures a service flag or service lapel button without having first obtained a license, or otherwise violates this section is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of not more than $1,000.

Regulations. The Secretary may prescribe regulations necessary to carry out this section.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...