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Does your troop wear neckerchiefs?

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Having just crossedover with my son into a very old troop (1937), I found out they did not have but one official troop neckerchief (they were home made, who knows how long ago) left, and because of that had stopped issueing them for many of the newer scouts. I was given the green light from our DE to go back and use the square, more original style, but getting them made might have to wait until some of the outgoing leaders are gone. I'm no little guy myself, and the idea of making a few larger version, to have a machine embroidered patch put on it, is motivation enough for me. The ones they still do have looked wonderful at the crossover, but the new scouts had to give them back after the ceremony. My son was so good about wearing his thru all 5 years of cubs with his collar tucked under, so the neckerchief looked more traditional. I don't want him to get out of that habit, so no time to lose.

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Kahits,

I certainly agree with you. Neckerchiefs worn over a turned-under collar are the traditional look for the BSA. They also give the scouts a neat appearance and instill pride. We have gathered a large collection of the old national issue full-squares from sources such as flea markets and e-bay auctions. A big full-sauare is presented to each member of the troop when he earns his Scout badge with the understanding that the scarf is on loan from the troop until he attains the rank of First-class. At that point the neckerchief is his for life. The Scouts are proud to wear the troop colors, use the full-square for first-aid and other uses ala "Scouting With a Neckerchief" and have an incentive to advance in rank. Good luck with your son's troop.

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So strange.

Just as @ozemu from Australia says, it's the same in Croatia.

For us scarf is the most important part of the uniform, and every scout wears it proudly.

For example, on summer camps, during the day, when we wear only T-shirts, almost everbody wear their neckerchiefs, even they don't need to.

We just like it this way. Wearing worn-out clothes and the scarf around the neck is being "tough scout".

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KLodi,

Thank you for giving us a needed perspective on the world-wide Scouting movement. The scarf identifies us to people all over the world. We should wear our neckerchiefs proudly as our heritage from the past and our link with Scouts around the globe.

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Just to show what am I talking about, see the banner on our Group's web

 

http://www.sk-marjan.hr/marjan/

 

Neckerchiefs are always on.

 

The site is in Croatian, so you won't understand anything, but if you're looking for some photos, try under IZBORNIK/Ljetopis(This message has been edited by Klodi)

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I also agree that it is the MOST important part of the uniform. When a boy makes Eagle, if he has never worn a neckerchief is it right that he should he be presented one at his Eagle COH?(This message has been edited by Herms)

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Klodi

 

I also see form the pictures a scout using semaphore flags - another skill US Scouts have lost. Is this skill common practice in Europe?

 

YIS

ron

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Well, for the rest of Europe I don't know, but in Croatia it is a common practice. It's among the most respected scout skills and a regular part of scout competitions.

 

We have two types of competitions:

- Scout Olympics for age 11-14, and

- Orienteering races for 15 up.

Teams are patrols.

 

Scout Olympics consists of:

- Semaphore signaling (30 letters on 50 m distance - speed & accuracy)

- First Aid

- Making a shelter and cooking a meal

- Setting fire

- Tying knots

- Short orienteering race

- Setting up a tent as quickly as possible (and in a correct manner)

 

In an Orienteering Race you got to:

- find control points on the map (6-8 of them), using various constructing methods

- find them in the nature using map and compass, the whole hike is usually around 20 km long

- make several topographic drawings (sketches, profile)

- send a message with semaphore

- send a message with Morse code

- make a shelter

- cook a meal

- First aid

and there are several other less interesting tasks.

 

These competitions in Croatia became a kind of sport (popular only among the scouts, indeed), so we even have the Croatian Scout League, a series of competitions all around country, with the final winner at the end of the scouting year.

 

I hope it's clear now why kids all practice those skills and try to do their best.

Even we, old scouters, do some practice occasionally and attend some competitions.

It's fun.

And yep, 30 letters semaphore we still make in 48 seconds :-).

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My old troop was sponsored by the First United Methodist Church, and our neckerchief was custom made. It had the a black cross, with the flames next to it just like the Methodist Flag. It was printed on Dark Green fabric. I always thought it looked very distinctive. It was never as good a troop 88 from Potosi Wisconcin, I think. They had two 8 balls sitting side by side. I forget the color of the fabric. I always liked the custom made ones, becouse they could identfy special things about the unit. Where they were lacated, and who sponsored them.

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Hmmmm, this is an interesting topic, when I was a Scout Master my troop was required to wear neckerchiefs. I have to thi nk this over.

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My troop use to wear them in the early eighties until the shirt change. We had no choice in the old v-neck yoke style shirts. I think I may have a couple of the square neckerchiefs around in scouting box.

 

My troop rarely wore our chosen neckerchief. We usually wore one from one of the camps we went to. The camps in my old council each had their own neckerchief and patch design for the Winter Camping season and another for Summer Camp. They usually had the dates and a different animal on them and varied the basic color. Of course the Philmont crew picked up Philmont ones to show off when we returned home.

 

We usually wore our neckerchiefs or Bolo ties only for special events (BOR, COH, etc).

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In my youth, the neckerchief was always worn as part of the uniform. We had a unique, homemade troop neckerchief.

 

The troop I now serve has chosen not to wear neckerchiefs. Except when they must wear them. In short, we are schizophrenic.

 

The troop has a chosen neckerchief design, and one is given to all new Scouts. But they have chosen not to wear them to troop meetings, while traveling to and from outings, or to summer camp. "Class A's" are defined as not including the neckerchief. The excuse is "the boys lose them." However, the neckerchief is required for Scoutmaster Conferences, Board of Reviews, and Courts of Honor.

 

When I became an ASM and donned my short-sleeved Scouter uniform, I learned in my research that a neckerchief was not required by adults with short-sleeved shirts. So I arrived at our next Court of Honor without a neckerchief. The ex-Scoutmaster, who still served as ASM, promptly asked why I wasn't wearing a neckerchief. So I went an got one. And I decided that I would wear a neckerchief to all troop meetings from then on. Then, when a Scout is ready for a SM conference or BOR, but has forgotten his neckerchief, and all his friends are without theirs too, guess who is able to loan him one?(This message has been edited by Eagle76)(This message has been edited by Eagle76)

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