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tagguy

Ideas for eagle project?

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There are lots of one-size-fits-all projects out there - building community nature trails, organizing food drives, adding on to a homeless shelter - but in my experience, the best way to go about a service project is to suggest that your Scouts take a very, very close look at your community, and find out what its needs are.

 

What are the small things on your mayor's or school superintendent's personal wish list? A bike lockup outside the public library? More school bus shelters for kids in bad weather? Talk with local service clubs and historical societies, librarians and police chiefs. Find out what makes the hands on your community's proverbial clock stop ticking once in a while, and figure out what you can do to help.

 

Just my two bits.

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Here's one that no eagle candidate seems think of: A community box where the community can deposit their old flags that they need to retire!

 

A nice "log house" type of a storage box (decoratively made) with a lid that is locked with a combo lock, on top would be an explanation for the need to retire the flag, and a deposit slot (several boxes would be better). This box would be placed at the local school, community center, supermarket, or etc. Of course, permission needs to be sought. The eagle candidate would arrange for the local cub scout packs, boy scout troops, or girl scout troops to check the box every month or quarterly and retire any flag that was deposited (rotating the assignment would be good). The eagle candidate would arrange for non-expiring "free" advertisement on local paper, community newsletter, postings at various places, etc.

 

Just a thought.

 

Outside of this, for other eagle project ideas, have your son and/or his eagle candidate friends to check with your local police department, fire department, social work department, community service group, church group, habitat for human, schools (especially charter schools or low income area schools), community parks, state parks, etc. for needs and/or projects.

 

Good luck!

 

1Hour

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The best ideas for an Eagle Project come from the Candidate themselves! Don't provide ideas and don't hand out cookie cutter projects!

 

Rather, sit down with your Life Scouts and see what else they are involved in? What are they passionate about? What is something they can do that they will be proud of for the rest of their lives? What is unique to their community? What is needed in their community? Help them brainstorm ideas and possibilities.

 

Allow the Candidate to come up with a few ideas.

Allow the Candidate to figure out who to contact to get approval for their project.

Allow the Candidate to find people with the skills they need to complete their project.

Allow the Candidate to face hurdles and overcome them.

Allow the Candidate to show their leadership skills.

 

I'm very passionate about this after having many chats with various Eagle Scouts. You can tell the ones that are proud of their projects and did all the work versus those that were told that the Park Commission had a couple of Eagle Projects they needed done.

 

Challenge your Scouts to demonstrate the skills that Scouting has taught them!

 

 

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I would find out what the Life Scout's interests are, and let him come up with a project on his own. For example. For example I knew one scout who was really into conservation and the environment, he did a reforestation project that lasted 8 weeks. Another scout had an interest in history, he collected oral histories of our veterans and turned the recordings to the state archives. Another guy had an elderly grandparent who was loosing their sight. So he recorded the bible on audiotapes and turned them in to the retirement home. You get the idea.

 

Any project is an experience, but if time is not a consideration, let him come up with their own ideas as you may be surprised.

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Props to those who support the candidate finding his own project. Encourage Scouts to look for opportunities to help others. Suggest they go talk to people in their church, school and community and seek their suggestions on things that need to be done, or problems that need solving. This is important growth development for the candidate, to see things that need to be done and come up with a solution and a plan to address it.

 

"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, Teach him to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."

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Start with the Scout.

 

What are his hobbies and interests? How can those be tranlated into a significant service project where the Scout must show leadership. Help him find his way :)

 

I know a young man, now a university sophomore in journalism. For his ELSP he did the Library of Congress Veteran's Oral History Project. He coordinated cameras for digital video tapings. He had Scouts operating the cameras. He trained Scouts to do the interviews. He trained adults to review the interviews and do some follow-up, if need or desire be. He had other Scouts edit and manipulate the raw data onto CDs, which the supported agency (our chartered partner, a VFW post), the veteran, and the Library of Congress received.

 

At this point, he was an 8th grader. From that, he was able to do four years of HS newspaper, and went on to a century-old J-School.

 

Help the young man find something he himself is interested in.

 

Don't be afraid of a "cerebral" project.

 

Talk with your District Advancement Chair if you have any doubts about how well the project might fly.(This message has been edited by John-in-KC)

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I don't encounter this problem much. Once in a while a boy will have trouble getting started but I basically follow Bob White's advice. Then, once the flow of ideas has overwhelmed his ability to choose, I help him by asking him which ones provide the greatest service, offer the best opportunity for him to demonstrate leadership, and are doable. We are surrounded by all sorts of parks with limited funding for improvements, etc. and schools, and we are in the Bible belt so...pick your church. Our problem is usually which project idea to pick...and how to keep Dad from trying to take it over (had this problem back in cubs with pinewood derby too).

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"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach him to fish and you give his wife a free weekend."

 

Seriously, the biggest problem I've seen is the Scout designing a project that involves others. Not a few I've heard suggested are basically one boy affairs. It has to be pointed out that the project's purpose is not only doing the good turn but demonstrating leadership in it's planning and completion. Hence the need to include "help" in plan.

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Keep talking to him. Emphasize the leadership part ... challenge him to make his project bigger in scope, so that it needs other people, who he must lead!

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