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gblotter

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Posts posted by gblotter


  1. 47 minutes ago, Hedgehog said:

    Trust me, 11 to 14 year old girls don’t want to be around 11 to 14 year old boys.

    I'm curious to know how your 11-14 year old girls will feel about attending a co-ed summer camp with boy troops (because co-ed BSA summer camps will be the reality). Speaking only for our 11-14 year old boys, the idea of co-ed summer camp is anathema to them. They would rather skip summer camp altogether and do our own wilderness camp instead.

    • Upvote 1

  2. 17 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

    It is those family members who passed while I was Scouting whom I wish I spent more time.

    I get it.

    I know other dedicated Scouters who willingly sacrifice unbelievable hours for the good of Scouting (i.e. they lead training weekends, they staff Camporee events, they mentor OA Lodges, they renovate dilapidated camp properties). I confess that my Scoutmaster motivations are more selfish (I want to facilitate a great Scouting experience for my son). When my son was unable to attend our troop campout last weekend, I wanted to transfer my duties to other adults/dads (but I ended up going anyway). I guess that makes me a "conditional Scouter" of a different variety.

     

    52 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

    I wonder if scouting is like work, in the end one wishes more time was spent with family?

    If you are asking yourself the question, you probably already know the answer.


  3. 5 minutes ago, MattR said:

    That's what boys want. It's not the boys that push for eagle, it's the parents, the scouters, the council and the BSA. People are worried that the addition of girls is going to wreck scouting for boys but the emphasis on schoolwork and advancement is what's doing it. Eagle has become the koolaid.

    I will not dispute your experience, but that has not been the experience for my son. My son definitely drank the Eagle KoolAid, and he will be the first to tell you that achieving the rank of Eagle Scout has been the highlight of his life so far. But in no way has advancement wrecked his Scouting experience. Yes - he has earned 57 merit badges, but he also has 50+ nights of camping and 150+ miles of hiking beneath his feet. Who says Eagle and adventure need to be mutually exclusive?


  4. 4 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

    This thought has been on my mind lately.  I wonder if scouting is like work, in the end one wishes more time was spent with family?

    I am the Scoutmaster of my son's troop, so Scouting time has been mostly family time.

    Many of us understand how consuming Scouting can become. I completely detached from my Scoutmaster persona during a recent two-week family vacation. It gave me a pleasant vision into what my life will be like after the LDS exit on 12/31/19. There is indeed life after Scouting.


  5. 5 minutes ago, Gwaihir said:

    So quit.  throw in the towel.  the fight is lost. 

    The fight is over with BSA, but it is not lost. My efforts will continue full force with our church youth program that is well-equipped in the realm of developing boys into responsible men, capable providers, strong fathers, and loyal husbands. In that environment, one may still assert that men and women are actually different, with each filling essential and complementary roles in life (how outrageous is that?).


  6. 11 minutes ago, Gwaihir said:

    Sorry, but we men need to stand up

    Let me know how that goes for you. Consider those on this relatively tame forum who dare to decry girls entering BSA (unScoutlike is the kindest of those characterizations).

    Are you ready to be assailed as sexist, chauvinistic, and patriarchal? You had better check your male privilege at the door. The only reason that article could be published at all is because the author is female.


  7. On 6/14/2018 at 1:05 PM, Eagledad said:

    Thanks, @Eagledad. I stumbled on this article before you posted the link on this forum. I cried when reading it because truly we are losing our boys and nobody cares. Not even BSA cares anymore. My son faces this on a daily basis in a school environment dominated by female teachers and female administrators. He is graded according to female methods of learning and disciplined according to female standards of behavior. Scouting has been his refuge - a safe space for boys to just be boys. That is now sacrificed on the altar of inclusiveness.

     

    On 6/14/2018 at 1:05 PM, Eagledad said:

    I know that as much as girls needed a program like the Boy Scout program, boys need it a lot worse.

    With troops of 12-13 year-old boys and 12-13 year-old girls in the same summer camp environment, tell me which will be called out for being disruptive and distracting, and which will be praised for being focused and attentive?

     

    On 6/14/2018 at 1:05 PM, Eagledad said:

    I get that the BSA has moved on and there is no going back, but just maybe a few here will be swayed to consider the needs of the boy

    There is no going back. So our boys will retreat to their last remaining dominions: sports teams for those who are athletically inclined, and the dropout society of the video game culture for the rest. Sad beyond belief. This social petri dish is putrid.


  8. All Scouting is local, and none of these decisions need change the experience for any of our Scouts ... unless they attend a summer camp, or a merit badge university, or a Camporee, or a Cub Scout Day Camp, or an OA Induction, or NYLT, or any other event sponsored at the District, Council, or National level. So the proposed solution is to draw inward, focus on the troop (la la la la la - I can't hear you Surbaugh), and insulate ourselves with as little involvement as possible with the larger Scouting world around us. What a sad commentary on the organization formerly known as the Boy Scouts.


  9. Any youth program (Scouting or otherwise) will reflect the dedication of the leaders who act as "fishers of men". You'll always find some who are extremely committed, and you'll always find others who just "wing it".

    I know of some stellar LDS troops, and I'm sure there will be wards who implement the new youth program in stellar fashion.

    I also know of some pathetic LDS troops, and I'm sure there will be wards who implement the new youth program in pathetic fashion.

    But overall, I am hopeful that the new youth program will meet the needs and fill the voids where Scouting came up short. Even in wards with great Scouting programs, there were inevitably some who did not get caught in the net.


  10. 6 hours ago, Jameson76 said:

    LDS decision is the LDS decision.  Possibly some LDS scouts will continue in non-LDS units but I am not versed in LDS family culture

    For our LDS troop of 30 Scouts, I know of only two boys who are considering joining a non-LDS unit in 2020. Less than 10 percent - I think you will see that as a common statistic.


  11. My father-in-law attended the annual meeting in Texas. Kool-Aid flowed in abundance.

    Everyone - yes, EVERYONE thinks girls in BSA is the greatest idea ever. The only reason anyone thinks badly of BSA is because the press has been plotting against them. Nothing needs to be fixed except the negative messages being portrayed by the media.

    Family, family, family. Get on the train or get run over. The demise of century-old traditions - swept away with smiles and marketing speak.

    Two high-ranking LDS leaders were there and spoke of the long and difficult decision to sever ties with BSA. It was not their choice - it was the will of God. Tears were shed.

    Not a word was mentioned about huge debts and looming balloon payments. What could possibly go wrong?

    • Sad 1
    • Upvote 2

  12. 3 hours ago, Chadamus said:

    What will keep you going?

    I am not speaking for @The Latin Scot ...

    I was ready to quit in February 2019, but my love for these boys will keep me going over the next 18 months. I have helped each of our Scouts craft an advancement plan, but it is their responsibility to execute on that plan. As Scoutmaster, I am in a support role to help them complete a journey started. Their motivation will be my motivation, but without question I will be done with BSA on 12/31/19.


  13. @The Latin Scot It’s a strange time for us LDS Scouters, with such a range of emotions.

    I’ve been involved in Scouting for most of my life as a boy and now an adult leader. Thomas S. Monson (recent LDS President and Silver Buffalo) famously said: “Decisions determine destiny”. BSA has shown us that decisions can also detour destiny.

    I’ve never been divorced, but I wonder if there are steps of acceptance and withdrawal that may apply here as we transition and move on.

    I’m glad we will have the next 18 months to work through this (both personally and organizationally). Especially for the most dedicated of LDS Scouters, there will be a lot to work through.

    • Upvote 2

  14. 5 hours ago, NJCubScouter said:

    I think that may have been the norm in the past, but we do them "on demand."

    There is nothing hard and fast about our scheduling. We are sensitive to individual needs. The main benefit of scheduling BOR every three months is that it lights a fire under the boys to work toward that date. Otherwise procrastination takes over.


  15. 21 minutes ago, NJCubScouter said:

    FireStone asked that in this discussion, we PUT ASIDE the doom and gloom.  I see later posts here where the doom and gloom has not remained off to the side, but is front-and-center.

    Amazing how that happens so easily with these online forums. @NJCubScouter You are absolutely correct, and I am the most guilty offender in this regard.

    I apologize for detouring off into the gloom-and-doom weeds with some of my comments.

    I think the dark storm clouds have probably dropped most of their rain by now, anyway. Do I see some sun breaking through?

     

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