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  2. Cambridgeskip

    What Have You Learned About Yourself

    That I'm claustrophobic! Went into an artificial caving complex with some scouts and there is nooooooo way I am ever doing that again. More generally that being outdoors is great therapy.
  3. Today
  4. ianwilkins

    What Have You Learned About Yourself

    When camping in the cold, I can drink tea for England.
  5. ParkMan

    Advice for a new wood badger

    Only because you'll be asking them
  6. 5thGenTexan

    Advice for a new wood badger

    Is it true if I go to WB people will stop telling me to go/asking if I have been?
  7. Treflienne

    Supporting the Patrol Method - as Unit Commissioner

    How I learned to wash dishes as a kid was camping with the Girl Scouts: the three dishpan method, third pot containing a bit of bleach. GS reinforced this when I took their leader training earlier this decade. Then I joined BSA, and bought the latest fieldbook being sold at the scout shop, and saw that it had (5th edition, p92) the bleach (or other sanitizer) in the second pot, not the third pot. It seemed a little odd, but I thought that I had better do things the BSA way now . . . So my troop did this on their first outing. Then I saw that the BSA handbook (14th edition p308) puts the sanitizer in the third pot. Makes much more sense, and I'd much rather the scouts do this. Trouble is, my scouts aren't convinced and having conflicting literature does not help. See, for example, Bryan on Scouting in 2017 https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2017/03/30/how-to-wash-dishes-at-campsite/ Do you a good reference to a public health department that mandates the sanitizer in the third and final pot? Or to you have any BSA literature repudiating the former sanitzer-in-second-not-third-pot practise? I'd like it to seem to my scouts more than just my arbitrary say-so in directing the scouts to follow one piece of scout literature versus another and put the sanitizer in the final rinse.
  8. Hey @The Latin Scot ! I am glad you are looking into being a UC. I think it is one of the best jobs in scouting for those of us who aren't needed in our own kids units. You have gotten some great advice so far. What I have seen of unit assignments is that there is a piece of advice passed through the commissioner corps that UC's should not be assigned to their "own" unit. Different DC's seem to take this differently. Sometimes it means not your son's troop, sometimes it means not the troop you grew up in. I am of the opinion that it helps to be a little separated but not too much. Try to look at yourself as a District scouter (enjoy those silver epaulets). I have always had 2 or 3 units. Sometimes I hike or camp with different ones. At district and council events, the corps has started camping together, complete with our a big commissioner flag and over the top camp food.
  9. TAHAWK

    Supporting the Patrol Method - as Unit Commissioner

    The SE was a decent guy. He had "taken one for the team" by closing a camp in a smaller council in Ohio - a camp that BSA wanted closed and probably needed closing due to lack of a waterfront and adequate space. His reward was to, largely, retire in place in our council with a higher salary. (To his credit, he did emphatically put a stop to registering mythical units , and membership, a constant problem in BSA councils and in ours in particular - we had 30% fictional membership when he took over, and he took the hit on the year-over-year "decline" to correct the books. But that seems to have been the last "hill" he was willing to storm.) Membership and financing continued to spiral downwards. Council now "serves" well under 5% of eligible youth. The replacement SE, told that many Scouters found training to be of low quality, decided the "solution" was less training, but leaving the same awful training leadership in place The emphasis of the couple in charge is on enlarging the "No" list, to the extent that we have fewer than a dozen "official" training staff in the entire council, so promised training is cancelled about as often as it happens. No "other' training in four years (Fortunately the councils around us have strong "other" training.) Promised Scouter training at summer camp canceled most weeks. Most past WB Course and NYLT course directors and several dozens of other experienced trainers are, with one exception, uniformly "NOs", so they staff in other councils, areas, region, at Philmont, and in Canada but not in their home council. So "less is more," and we are meeting that objective. This SE has set up "Service Areas" - like districts run by typical "professionals." 😡 "Roundtables" are 75% or more announcements or exhortations to give money/sell stuff/ patronize counsel profit-making activities, with predictable impact on attendance. ("Has your estate plan recognized your obligation to support scouting?") But what do we know? I am reminded of the debate at a National Jamboree between the "professional" "supporting" health and safety about safe dish-washing, the head volunteer Gold Hat having run off. The "professional" had a BA and, doubtless, Camp School training. On the other side was a fellow with a Phd in Microbiology. In later years, he was a top executive at the World Health Organization, specializing in E. coli. While in Switzerland, he was selected as a lecturer in biotechnology at the Haute Ecole Specialier. The Camp hospital was filling with E. coli dysentery cases. The Virginia Department of Health would come to threaten pulling the permit for the Jamboree over illegal dish-washing practices. But what did Doctor Horsfall know compared to a "professional."? We WOULD put the chlorine in the second, and final, hot rinse! In the end, B.S.A. capitulated to the Health Department's ultimatum and distributed third washtubs to all Jambo troops for the legally required final, tepid sanitizing rinse - although it took over fourteen years to change official B.S.A. practices. (Our two troops already had and were using the third tub and had no dysentery cases, mere volunteers us. Horsfall had presented at our Roundtables years before, being from our area, so we knew the proper practice and ignored the Handbook practice.) (Some printings of the 12th Ed. relapsed into error a few years ago, but it was corrected - all with no announcement. The 13th Ed. is incorrect. Like the incorrect illustration of the tripod lashing that has come and gone in BSA publications for almost sixty years, error has a high survival quotient [13th Ed. illustration is correct. 12th Ed. illustration is incorrect.].) We need all hands on deck for bare survival. That necessity is not uniformly recognized, much less who the "top hands" are. Until then, one can only prepare and hope for an opportunity to serve. Oh, and give money. No list No. 147.
  10. Here we go: From the form in 2018 From 2016: (2014 was the same) 2012- 2009- Javascript seems to have prevented the internet archive from catching further back than that but this is 10 years worth.
  11. 5thGenTexan

    What Have You Learned About Yourself

    We only had an overnight camp, but I was happy to hit the salad bar last night at dinner.
  12. Is it though? As i look at the various versions of the adult application online it doesn't seem like this is actually asking for much more than the application did. I wonder if this is more about catching all those adults who have been continuously registered for longer than the current practice. Seems like if you applied recently, they already have this authorization.
  13. Chadamus

    What Have You Learned About Yourself

    I'm addicted to the woods. When a week goes by and I'm not camping or hiking or just sitting around a campfire, I get antsy. I crave it. It's like a weird primal urge to get oudoors. Also, at summer camp I really enjoy a salad for lunch and dinner.
  14. desertrat77

    What Have You Learned About Yourself

    I've found I like simple camping the best. Less gear, gear that is elementary/low tech, food that simple fare but high quality. A real camp fire...for cooking..conversation...listen to the wind blowing through trees. Acceptable number of hissing, over-bright propane lanterns: zero. Etc.
  15. After being a leader what have you found out about yourself? District / Council campouts that are packed 8 am to 10 pm with program have shown me I do A LOT of "boredom eating" and sitting. Yesterday over the course of an entire day I walked ten miles only eating at the designated times. I don't need to nap, I don't need to scrounge for candy all day. Big revelation for me really.
  16. Yesterday
  17. walk in the woods

    BSA’s new Background Check Authorization Form

    True but the BSA is demanding a new and broader agreement than before so prudent folks will reevaluate the risk reward structure in light of the BSAs current political, financial, and legal environment.
  18. Thunderbird

    Court of Honor

    Battery operated "candles" might be an option, although they would pretty much need to be turned on at the beginning of the ceremony (the Scouts wouldn't have the fun part of lighting the candles). Another version I have seen is where each Scout has his or her own candle (like a votive candle). And as the Scout earns a new rank, the Scout moves his / her candle up a ladder (each ladder rung represents a rank). A very simple candle candelabra could be made out of a small log kind of like this:
  19. desertrat77

    First Campout...

    Congratulations! I completely understand re the kids and their amazement at the word "no." As a former JROTC instructor, I saw the same dynamic.
  20. 5thGenTexan

    First Campout...

    I lived and made it home. But there were kids this weekend that looked at me like I was crazy and it was their first time EVER. When I used the word "No".
  21. Liz

    Court of Honor

    At my older kids' Troop, they lit 12 candles as they explained each point of the Scout Law, and then a 3-tiered candle for the Scout Oath. I always thought that was kinda cool but I don't know what the girls will think of it. We might not be able to do candles in the school where we usually meet, but we can schedule the COH for one of the times we are meeting at an alternate location (sometimes the school isn't available and we meet at the park or in a conference room at the Council office). We only have 6 Scouts so far, although we are gearing up to at least triple our size with the graduating Webelos girls from the various packs and that's if only a fraction of the eligible girls cross over - we are the only troop for girls in town that is accepting new members. I like the idea of a slide show in the long run. Right now I'm not sure where we'd find the equipment. Maybe the Council office will have some if we use that location. I'll talk to the SPL about it and see what she'd like to do. Thanks for all the awesome suggestions.
  22. Yeah, I've been really torn as to whether to keep this Scouts BSA–specific, or to have it more agnostic. What do you think? I don't really want to make a specific guide for each unit type (nevermind that I know almost nothing about Venturing or Exploring), but I felt that to leave out some of the Troop specific stuff would be to make it less useful to those who are probably the most likely to be using it—those trying to start girl Troops. Excellent idea. I'm not sure what this would look like.
  23. Thunderbird

    Court of Honor

    I think they no longer sell the Troop Resources Book (or maybe they sell it under a different name) at Scout shops. It looks like they put at least some of it online at: BSA Troop Program Resources https://troopresources.scouting.org Troop Courts of Honor https://troopresources.scouting.org/troop-courts-of-honor/ There are a bunch of scripts online. One word of caution: a lot of scripts have old / outdated information in them (for example: some scripts still have the "First Class-First Year" concept in them, but FCFY no longer matches up with the current Scout Handbook. JMO, I think it would be better to just say that Scouts advance at their own pace and not include a timeframe.) I agree with @Eagle94-A1 , have the SPL assign a Scout to do research and maybe also be the Scout in charge of the court of honor. This Scout could use this as an opportunity to complete Communication MB requirement #8. You could assign an adults to serve as coach (Advancement Chair, Communication MBC, ASM, or whoever you think is appropriate). Some things the Scout / PLC might want to consider: Do they want refreshments? If so, what kind? Before / after the COH? Do they want a slide show? If so, what kind? (pictures of what the troop has done since the last COH or over the past year. Or slideshows of what the badges / ranks look like.) Do they want a ceremony involving candles? (I have seen a few different ceremonies with candles. Sometimes a candle represents each rank, or each point of the Scout Law, or one candle for each Scout as the Scout moves up in ranks. Lots of variations here if this is something they want to do.) How long do they want the COH to last?
  24. That’s not unique to this new agreement though.
  25. walk in the woods

    BSA’s new Background Check Authorization Form

    Problem is, that check gets you on the IV list. Then, when those lists get subpoenaed in the next round of law suits, there your name is to be drug through the dirt, even if the check was wrong.
  26. hikeoholic

    One of my new favourite scout photos

    The adventures with the challenging adverse conditions are the ones they will always talk about years from now.
  27. HashTagScouts

    Court of Honor

    The script versions they can google can be helpful in writing their own, but they would probably want to see some in action, so I might suggest watching some on Youtube first. Many are only about 30-40 minutes long, though they can probably FFWD through and not have to see the award presentation for every scout. A couple to get them started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HR741O7xn2o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DiXymm0Dg0I
  28. Eagle94-A1

    Court of Honor

    Have your SPL assign one of her Scouts to do research. there are a ton of scripts out there. Also there were some ideas int eh Troop Resources Book if memory serves.
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  • Posts

    • That I'm claustrophobic! Went into an artificial caving complex with some scouts and there is nooooooo way I am ever doing that again. More generally that being outdoors is great therapy.
    • When camping in the cold, I can drink tea for England.
    • Only because you'll be asking them
    • Is it true if I go to WB people will stop telling me to go/asking if I have been? 
    • How I learned to wash dishes as a kid was camping with the Girl Scouts: the three dishpan method, third pot containing a bit of bleach.  GS reinforced this when I took their leader training earlier this decade. Then I joined BSA, and bought the latest fieldbook being sold at the scout shop, and saw that it had (5th edition, p92) the bleach (or other sanitizer) in the second pot, not the third pot. It seemed a little odd, but I thought that I had better do things the BSA way now . . .  So my troop did this on their first outing. Then I saw that the BSA handbook (14th edition p308) puts the sanitizer in the third pot.  Makes much more sense, and I'd much rather the scouts do this.  Trouble is, my scouts aren't convinced and having conflicting literature does not help.  See, for example, Bryan on Scouting in 2017 https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2017/03/30/how-to-wash-dishes-at-campsite/ Do you a good reference to a public health department that mandates the sanitizer in the third and final pot?  Or to you have any BSA literature repudiating the former sanitzer-in-second-not-third-pot practise?  I'd like it to seem to my scouts more than just my arbitrary say-so in directing the scouts to follow one piece of scout literature versus another and put the sanitizer in the final rinse.
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