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  1. Today
  2. If you or your unit are going to take scouts into the backcountry, seriously consider taking this course: https://www.nols.edu/en/about/risk-services/training-courses/wilderness-risk-management-with-nols-and-rei/. This is the perfect compliment to a wilderness first aid course because it teaches how to avoid unnecessary risks beforehand as well as what to do after you've stabilized your patient. I'm a council IOLS Instructor, ASM, and a grad of WB, Powder Horn, and Kodiak. I'm also an Eagle Scout and former NOLS Senior Course Leader who taught this material for 13 years. This course is well suited for scouters and is better than any the BSA provides for this subject mater. You will not get this info at IOLS, WB, PTC, Powder Horn, Kodiak, Scouter U., or the National Camp School. PM me if you have questions.
  3. What Malraux said. RTC would earn the Commish Arrow, etc. I have not heard of a Scouter Training Award for RTC or RTCStaff either.
  4. willray

    Adult led and youth led

    It's the ones that seem to be trying really hard not to lead, but that seem incapable of not attracting a following, that I find fascinating. It would absolutely be a real beast of an analysis to tease out the "learned from osmosis" stuff from innate ability, but that would be half the fun.
  5. It looks like roundtable got moved into the commissioner category and thus the general commissioner awards apply. But that's above my pay grade so I don't know.
  6. ParkMan

    Adult led and youth led

    I'm sure that both nature & nurture play a role. However, I tihnk that in even more cases it simply comes seeing countless examples of leadership by their parents. That's why often the children of good leaders themselves become good leaders. Kids see their parents doing it an just do the same.
  7. Yesterday
  8. Kudu

    Adult led and youth led

    Seems worthy of a new thread, "Natural Leaders."
  9. willray

    Adult led and youth led

    I am curious, whether in your experience you feel that this leadership skill seems to "run in families". While I can't put a percentage on it, it occurs to me that I know a few kids whose fathers appear to be natural leaders, and even if the kids try rather hard not to be leaders, they still end up with a patrol/patrol-like group following them around. (kids here, because these aren't all scouts). On the other hand, I know a few kids whose parents are dreadful leaders, and it sure seems like no amount of coaching is ever going to raise them to anything better than mediocre at leadership. My day job, or at least a part of it, involves trying to tease the genetic "nature vs nurture" out of similar questions, and this one had never occurred to me to think about trying to analyze.
  10. 69RoadRunner

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    That sounds like a challenge. 😋 We have another gear check on Saturday. The parents have been slow following my suggestions. Then we'll do a full gear hike of a couple of miles and practice with the stoves and setting up our dining fly. Last night at our regular meeting, we showed several of the Philmont videos to the entire troop. I'd sent them out to the crew, but I suspect few watched them. We have a trail that runs through our neighborhood. No fires or camping are allowed along it, but it has a stream. No significant hills. We'll be OK if not ideal.
  11. Kudu

    Adult led and youth led

    My initial inclination is to encourage Free Range Kids to organize around the original fortnight edition of Scouting for Boys. As in the days before Troops were common, a Lone Patrol would seek out, as needed, adults in the community with expertise in the outdoor skills they wish to master. Perhaps a church, school club, hiking group, outdoor store clinic, local chapter of Let Grow, former BSA volunteers, etc. (I'd be interested in additional suggestions). Adult Led / Youth Led then becomes: Youth Led adults whose services can be terminated as needed. Some day I'd like to see a spin-off thread on the research behind @Eagledad's observation that only about 3% of the population are "Natural Leaders." In my experience Barry's figure is exactly right. In a Troop of 32 Scouts, typically I trust only one or two to take a Patrol out into the field with no adult supervision. And, like @qwazse, I do sometimes meet these 3 in 100 "Alec in Wilderland" kids, with a Patrol-size following. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXHCiIQtqoQ&t=11s Yours at 300 feet, Kudu Kudu.Net
  12. willray

    Camping MB and long-term camp

    Ah, I guess I was thinking "high adventure" in terms of most of what our troop does, rather than "high adventure takeout"... We occasionally do Seabase, but do a lot more "Hit a National Park/some navigable waterway/etc with backpacks and head for the backcountry sites". In reality, of course, it's something that would almost never come up, but I'd think I'd feel a bit strange telling a scout "Sorry Tom, you and Tim went on all the same trips, but Tim bailed on each of them after the 2nd day, so he's going to earn this MB. If you wanted to earn it, you shouldn't have camped so much".
  13. qwazse

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    Don't knock neighborhood hikes! Especially if they include preparing a meal in a local park. It really is # of hikes over length of hikes. When the blisters came in my crew, it was at mile 1. I'm not saying limit town hikes to just a mile. But most of the challenge is getting everyone past that first mile. When a contingent can do that, then the stream crossing skills and other things can proceed with all present. I suspect that your crew will be the least of your ranger's worries.
  14. qwazse

    Camping MB and long-term camp

    Never say never. BSA HA bases have the meals packed in advance. Very little forethought required. Seabase: no campfires. Philmont: depends on the weather. World Jamboree's tents are going to be in a crate in a field waiting for us. If a boy chooses his HA's so that meals are ready-packed, his tent is folded, and half his gear is provided, I would feel that he's missing the letter and spirit of the requirements. In a sense the weekend "PLOP" camp-outs around his area may require a whole different set of skills and provide opportunities big-ticket scouting could never offer. It's a funny badge that way. It's not about the numbers, yet it is about the numbers. I would never feel sorry for the 20+ HA guy. He's had lots of fun. He just doesn't earn the merit badge. I've never understood why this is a problem.
  15. MikeS72

    First Women

    Tipisa 326 inducted its first female youth members back during the first weekend in February (with the CSE in attendance). This past weekend two of those new members were elected as the first female officers in the lodge.
  16. MikeS

    First Women

    Passaconaway Lodge here in NH just got its first female youth 'Arrowman' this past weekend at the Spring Ordeal/Fellowship Weekend.
  17. cm289

    “Centennial” uniform sourcing

    Haha- I do have the belt. I took the pic when the wind was blowing about 30mph, using my hand to keep tunic from flapping. I had been in a parade rest stance.
  18. RememberSchiff

    “Centennial” uniform sourcing

    Did you get a belt? I'm guessing your right hand (not shown) is holding up your pants?
  19. jr56

    Hornaday Award????

    Everything is decided by a special Hornaday award committee at Austin, TX that meets twice a year. My son submitted his application packet in Oct, immediately after the committee met in Sept. He had to wait until the following March for the committee to meet again, and render their decision.
  20. Eagledad

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    I found that most boys aren't willing to do the kind of backpacking that will get them in shape. The altitude alone will slow them down no matter their shape. But, I've never had a scout dropout because he was out of shape. They can handle most trails. It's their feet that cause most of the physical problems on the trail. I recommend at least one, and two if you can, 5 mile hikes with full gear. That will give everyone enough miles to respect the weight of the pack and learn about foot (feet?) comfort. One of our younger scouts after one such hike decided the large jar of hair jell wasn't a good idea. And if the scouts are going to develop a blister, the 5 mile hike is the place to do it. If you can, find a long downhill slope. The downhill slope will determine if the boots fit properly because the feet will be force into the toe. A comfortable boot on flat ground can become too small on a downhill slope and stress and bruise the toes. Adults will find out quickly is their knees are healthy or require hiking poles. Also, the 5 mile hike is the better place to adjust the packs to each person. The weight needs to be carried on the hip belt with the shoulder straps slightly loose. But, often the vertical adjustments aren't set correctly after purchase (or the scout went through a growing spurt), so the straps need to be readjusted. For the vertical backpack setup, the shoulder strap attachment point should be about level with the top of the shoulder with all the weight sitting on the hip belt. As the scouts settle in and get used to their pack, they may need some readjustment, but it shouldn't be much. Good luck and have a great time. Barry
  21. As our District’s (maybe even the Council’s) resident history buff/uniform nerd, I thought I’d share a source for those of you interested in creating a reproduction 1910s-era uniform. WhatPriceGlory.com sells an olive drab US Army M1912 Summer Cotton tunic and breeches that are nearly identical to what early scouters wore. They also have the puttees and leggings, as well as campaign hats and wool version of the M1912 and M1917 uniforms. The button holes on the cotton tunic are designed for metal ring backed buttons, so it’s no big deal to swap out the supplied USA buttons for metal BSA buttons I’ve acquired through the years. I’ve got the BSA collar brass, but no troop number brass, so I’ll be crafting a felt patch to add to the sleeve. Looking for the tan version? No problem, check out ManTheLine.com, although their prices are significantly more expensive. I’m still searching for a 1920s version of the uniform (safari jacket style), but until then- happy repro Scouting!
  22. Eagle94-A1

    Recommendations for canister stove

    The Chinese knock off is what I am worried about. I am willing to wait and save up for good equipment. I don't like to keep buying something over and over. One reason why I am upset abut the stove. This will #3. Normal backpacking. I am not familiar with that brand, but worth looking into with 84% 4+ stars Yes I know that liquid alcohol fuels are not recommended, and "Equipment that is handcrafted, homemade....Examples include alcohol-burning “can” stoves...." are prohibited. That is why I bought one alcohol stove and received a 2nd one for a Christmas present. Both are manufactured by companies. Although I have made 2 alcohol stoves, I do not bring them to Scouts BSA camp outs.
  23. jjlash

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    The thing I seem to forget and am therefore destined to relearn on every trek is that the Scouts have different priorities than the adults. We want them to be physically prepared because we fear that we are not. We want them to learn the map/compass skills so we are not embarrassed when ranger asks them to orient the map. We want them to practice hanging bear bags so it doesnt take 2 hours for the first few nights. They dont care about any of those things - they are young and athletic and will not feel the pain, they dont mind learning the map skills again, they seem to enjoy the fellowship of trying to get the food hung. Let them struggle. To bring on storming. So they can work through the issues. And be stronger for it.
  24. Also - so that it has been said....You do know that alcohol stoves are specifically addressed in the G2SS, right?
  25. 69RoadRunner

    Recommendations for canister stove

    Is this for normal backpacking or Philmont style, patrol backpacking with giant pots? If you're not using giant pots, you can't beat this for price: https://smile.amazon.com/Etekcity-Ultralight-Portable-Backpacking-Ignition/dp/B00B4FY8YO/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=3RKUKII1Q13BO&keywords=etekcity+ultralight+portable+outdoor+backpacking+camping+stoves&qid=1558550280&s=gateway&sprefix=etekcity+ultralight%2Caps%2C177&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1
  26. DuctTape

    Recommendations for canister stove

    The "pocket rocket" type can be found cheaply. They are quite light, and easy to screw on to the canister. There are many name-brands like Primus, MSR which cost $20 - $100. The off-brand chinese knock-offs are less than $20. You get what you pay for.
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  • Posts

    • If you or your unit are going to take scouts into the backcountry, seriously consider taking this course: https://www.nols.edu/en/about/risk-services/training-courses/wilderness-risk-management-with-nols-and-rei/. This is the perfect compliment to a wilderness first aid course because it teaches how to avoid unnecessary risks beforehand as well as what to do after you've stabilized your patient. I'm a council IOLS Instructor, ASM, and a grad of WB, Powder Horn, and Kodiak. I'm also an  Eagle Scout and former NOLS Senior Course Leader who taught this material for 13 years. This course is well suited for scouters and is better than any the BSA provides for this subject mater.  You will not get this info at IOLS, WB, PTC, Powder Horn,  Kodiak, Scouter U., or the National Camp School.  PM me if you have questions.
    • What Malraux said.   RTC would earn the Commish Arrow, etc.   I have not heard of a Scouter Training Award for RTC or RTCStaff either.     
    • It's the ones that seem to be trying really hard not to lead, but that seem incapable of not attracting a following, that I find fascinating.  It would absolutely be a real beast of an analysis to tease out the "learned from osmosis" stuff from innate ability, but that would be half the fun.
    • It looks like roundtable got moved into the commissioner category and thus the general commissioner awards apply. But that's above my pay grade so I don't know.
    • I'm sure that both nature & nurture play a role.  However, I tihnk that in even more cases it simply comes seeing countless examples of leadership by their parents.  That's why often the children of good leaders themselves become good leaders.  Kids see their parents doing it an just do the same.  
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