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  2. Jameson76

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Didn't you mean - Twenty-seven 8-by-10 color glossy pictures with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one explaining what each one was, to be used as a Guide to Safe Scouting – even including some aerial photography.
  3. walk in the woods

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    I for one would very much like the G2SS be a one-pager that says, use common sense, talk to your parents, follow the oath and law. But, it doesn't. It's however many hundred pages with inclusions by reference, appendicies, and pictures with circles and arrows. Since that's what we have to work with, we'd like them to be clear and consistent. Here on this board you have what I'm going to assume is an honest question asked by a typical scouter. The responses to that question are showing some confusion with the wording of the various documents and web pages and local practices. Nobody wants more documentation, but a simple answer would be awful nice. Does overnighter mean just one night? It's a yes or no question. So, how bout you add some value and answer it.
  4. walk in the woods

    Country Meats

    This is our experience as well. People were going to buy the Christmas wreaths anyway, and now they get to support scouting along the way. Everybody wins.
  5. Today
  6. MikeS72

    "pitch a fit" induction

    Sound advice, although the situation being referred to took place 14 years ago. 😀
  7. Thunderbird

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Most of the time, just setting them out to air dry for a couple days is good enough. For tech fabrics, I wash in the washing machine using a detergent called HEX Performance. Then I put in the dryer using the no heat / air dry setting with a tennis ball or two to fluff it up again. Afterwards, can hang it up for a couple days to make sure it is completely dry before putting it away.
  8. I first attended WB in 1982, SE-293. I then attended WB for 21st Century, and is was very different from the last course. I have also participated in many courses and they were all a little different. I am going to attend the Summit course in Jan 2020 as a participant and I'm sure that it will be quite different from the first 2 courses that I attended. No matter if you took the Explorer Leader course at Schiff or the newest of the new course at the Summit, they all provide an enjoyable and informative training opportunity.
  9. Mrjeff

    "pitch a fit" induction

    This is certenly a sensitive situation. Perhaps this sh ould be brought to the attention of the Lodge Advisor who could look into the facts surrounding this induction. Then the Lodge Advisor can pass it on to the Lodge Chief who can present it to the LEC and let them decide. That way Scoutmasters, committees, and unit members who have a specific interest will be removed from any decision that is made. I suggest that whenever there is a conflict involving the OA, the Lodge Chief and his LEC be informed and allowed to take what action deemed appropriate.
  10. Jameson76

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Sometimes the large industrial washers and dryers do a good job. I have washed some of my synthetic bags that way. Did a down one hand wash and tumbled at the laundry
  11. qwazse

    Advice for a new CC

    That's actually fairly typical traffic for any new website. Folks out their are really bored. Actually, with the slew of World Scouts Jamboree participants passing through DC, you'd pop up on a lot of their searches. But, here's hoping that some of those are scouts whose parents are relocating to your fine city for a time and they want to stay active. The Italian exchange student who joined my crew was thrilled when she heard that she could continue scouting with my crew. It wasn't a perfect fit for her, but I think it bridged a couple of gaps.
  12. qwazse

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Roughly the same, but no fragrances/fresheners. I will leave them out a couple of days if the weather is nice. I will put my tech fabrics in a washer. Dry on low. My son's down bag: the tub, then dry on high briefly. I throw in a tennis ball to fluff it. My synthetic fleece blankets seem to go through the wash cycle well. Wool requires a little more care, but they don't smell-up as quickly either. That's probably because I don't pull them out unless I'm bracing for bitter cold.
  13. mrkstvns

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    There are other things that can be "overnighters" but that I don't consider to be camping. My son's pack did some "overnighters" like a night in the Zoo, or a sleep aboard on the USS Lexington. These are fun things for the boys to do, but they're not in the woods, don't involve setting up tents, don't involve cooking their meals, and similar things that really define "camping". Just saying...
  14. I try not to wash my sleeping bag very often because it's kind of a pain, and it always seems to feel a bit lumpy afterwards. Still, there are plenty of times where a good wash and dry is the only thing to do, short of buying a new one. GENERALLY... After each campout, I open it up, spray it with Febreze and hang it over the rail of my deck to air out. WHEN IT GETS TO SMELLY/WET/SWEATY/DIRTY... I hand-wash it in a tub using laundry soap, then I lay it out on the deck to dry. Usually, I wash it in the morning and leave it out all day in the sun. I NEVER... Wash it in a washing machine and I never dry it in a clothes dryer. I don't take it to a cleaners. What do you do to keep the sleeping bag clean and fresh and lasting as long as possible?
  15. Pale Horse

    Country Meats

    You're right, it's a donation to support Scouting. We're fine with that; we know it, and our customers know it. Nobody is "lying", if they want cheap popcorn, they know it can be bought inside the supermarket we're selling in front of. Yet for some reason, his Pack still sells thousands of dollars outside supermarkets. My son isn't trying to run a business. We're out funding our adventure in the most efficient manner possible, so we can get back to doing Scout stuff.
  16. Cburkhardt

    Advice for a new CC

    The results of the Troop coffee fundraiser are in, and we netted $7,600 to surpass our goal of $4,000. We probably have another $500 to come in from some stragglers. On top of this we received $6,000 from some institutional sources, so we have what we need to greatly subsidize the costs of our under-resourced families and their girls in our 30-Scout Troop. We will use some for some equipment purchases and make a Friends of Scouting contribution to our local council (something like $1,500). The rest we will save to begin building our long-term fund for stability. Thanks to everyone for the many good suggestions. We used every one of them. Note to Liz: There is no girl-specific Web Site template out there at this point. We wrote ours from scratch after we figured out how we would operate. Then we did our best to determine what an 11-13 year old girl and her parents would want to know about that implementation and wrote to that specific interest in our very-urban environment. We talk directly to that girl except for my “Scoutmaster’s Letter” to the parents — but even that is very specific to our urban all-girl implementation. I will say the writing of the site turned out to be the way we ended up understanding our challenges and deciding how the Troop would launch and operate. The site has been a huge hit. Our new parents love it because it is beginner-friendly and explains the basics without using any Scouting lingo or abbreviations. While not relevant to our use of our site, it is interesting to note that it has been viewed by 2.2K discrete visitors since going active on October 1, 2018, including viewers from 40 countries. Maybe this is just a typical result for troop web sites — I just don’t know.
  17. In my experience there are several factors as to why young adults do not stick around. College is indeed a big one. One issue I faced when I was under 25 was that other adults refused to view me as a fellow adult with the same knowledge, abilities, and skills that they had. As a 21 year old OA chapter advisor, that was a big issue with others on the district committee I sat with. I was either told I don't know what i'm talking about, or ignored all together. I had to use my allies on the committees to get my ideas across fro the benefit of the Scouts. Worse case was the SM who wanted me to alter the troop's OA election results. He actually followed me into the parking lot, cursing me out and saying I had no idea what I was doing in the OA. But the #1 factor I see now affects the 18-20 year olds, and we need to keep them active. The problem is thatr National no longer counts them as adults in regards to YP guidelines. I remember the stink that happened when National tried to implement the policy immediately, and troops started complaining to the councils and HA bases because they would have to cancel trips because they were relying on the 18-20 y.o. ASMs as the 2nd adult. If the young adults do not believe National trusts them as adults, why should they stick around?
  18. Jameson76

    New troop. New opportunity. Advice?

    Read Green Bar Bill Hillcourt's books. That will help
  19. There are older brothers of our scouts, with great skills that they learned in scouting, that I would like to tap to help with our Scouts BSA girls -- were they not away from home attending college. There are also older cousins, male and female, in their twenties, with Eagle Scout and Venturing backgrounds, that I would love to tap to help out -- except that they live out of state. We live in a town which people leave at age 18. And to which people move at around age thirtyish, already married, and either with preschool children, or thinking about soon having children.
  20. Treflienne

    Advice for a new CC

    The www.ScoutsBsaDcGirls.org website is great! Our troop ended up going with using the services provided by bsahosting.org Our committee member who was looking into this liked that the website came with email lists for the troop with a reasonable privacy policy that did not involve selling our data. They have a template troop website that a troop can customize.
  21. shortridge

    New troop. New opportunity. Advice?

    To clarify: We have no existing traditions, no old guard, no ingrained practices. This is effectively a clean slate to start from, posing a unique and interesting opportunity.
  22. Yesterday
  23. elitts

    Real estate donation

    One of the issues that will be relevant is the payment of property taxes. If the property isn't held for exempt purposes, the annual taxes will have to come out of someone's pocket. It would probably be worth speaking with a tax lawyer to figure out how to get around that part, then decide where to go from there.
  24. Liz

    Country Meats

    We don't live in an area that has a strong cultural support of Scouts. There are individuals who will pay/buy anything of course; but as a rule we wouldn't have a chance of having a single Scout selling $1,000 worth of popcorn. We definitely have that opportunity with the candy and meat sticks we sell instead. I lived in a different Council when my older kids were in Scouts. In particular, we lived in an area that had a stronger support of Scouting than the general area the Council covered. We participated in popcorn sales but didn't earn enough to make a dent in our yearly fundraising goals. My kids would go door to door and collect maybe $60 in outright donations if they were lucky and maybe one person would order some popcorn, necessitating another trip out to deliver it. They'd go door to door in the same neighborhood a couple months later taking orders for Christmas Wreaths and bring in a ton of money. For a couple of years, we started selling a local eco-friendly coupon book alongside the popcorn fundraiser. The kids did MUCH better when they could walk up to the door and say "Would you like to buy some popcorn or would you prefer this $20 coupon book?" We went through cases of those coupon books. The only people who bought popcorn were the occasional Scouting family who kind of considered it a tradition to buy the Scout popcorn. As in, maybe one or two people in the neighborhood in any given year. This wasn't a case of them automatically buying the cheapest option to support Scouts. This was a case of actually offering something of value that people were interested in, or at least willing to buy. Planning a trip on Amtrak within the next year? Going to buy a case of organic flour at Bob's Red Mill? Get your money back by using just this one coupon! I agree that popcorn sales are really a "thank you for your donation" more than a product sale. And if you don't live in a place where people are really wanting to make donations to BSA, it doesn't go over real well. I'm so glad the Council we are in now doesn't bother with it.
  25. Author Dr. Henry Hamrick’s relationship with Bud Schiele was established in the late 1950s and 60s at the Piedmont Boy Scout Camp on Lake Lanier near Tryon. Schiele was the chief scout executive for the Piedmont Council and directed the camp during those years. Hamrick made his first trip to Lake Lanier when he was 9 years old, and after spending a few summers there as a camper, he returned for several more as a counselor. It added up to eight consecutive years of his life that he would never forget, as he helped scouts earn merit badges by teaching skills such as swimming, lifesaving and woodworking. Schiele, a native of Philadelphia, was a self-styled naturalist and botanist who amassed an impressive collection of wildlife, rocks and minerals in the decades after he moved to Gastonia in 1924. He was 67 years old in 1961 when he used that trove to found the Gaston County Museum of Natural History, which was renamed in his honor four years later. Its opening was a culmination of a lifetime devoted to studying, cataloging and preserving nature. “A lot of my book focuses on how he came to Gastonia, how he got started, the odds he faced, and how he recruited a lot of leaders in churches and businesses to support scouting,” said Hamrick. Dr. Henry Hamrick’s book also delves into the important role that Lily Hobbs Schiele had in supporting and enhancing her husband’s endeavors, particularly with respect to honoring Native American cultures. “I think people will find that Mr. Schiele was a true leader, an organizer, and a man of great principal, and that he truly believed the Boy Scout movement was something that would help the youth of the country to become better adults,” said Hamrick. “And Mrs. Schiele was right there and on board with all of that.” “Boy Scouting in the North Carolina Foothills, 1909-1958” spans 140 pages and should be available later this month or in November. It is being distributed by Itasca Books, and interested readers can obtain a copy by calling the company at 1-800-901-3480. More at source: https://www.gastongazette.com/news/20191013/new-book-pays-tribute-to-bud-schiele-legacy-of-scouting
  26. elitts

    Country Meats

    Let me re-write that for you more accurately. Our Pack of 38 Cubs will sell $65k in popcorn solicit $65,000 in donations. My son is on pace to sell $8k in popcorn collect $8,000 in donations, and will barely crack top 10 in our council of 60,000 scouts. Do people reach those levels selling meat sticks? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The core of the problem people have with popcorn is that calling it a "product sale" is so disingenuous it's practically lying. The popcorn is SO overpriced that it's no longer a product sale, it's merely a conversation opening for scouts to solicit a donation. In fact, if a troop approached most councils with a different yet equivalently priced product, it wouldn't meet the requirements for an appropriate fundraiser.
  27. Liz

    Advice for a new CC

    I love your website! Is this a template that's available for purchase or did someone donate their time and talents to create it just for your Troop? We are looking at getting our website up and running shortly and man, if we don't have to re-invent the wheel, it would make me happy!
  28. I’m the CC of a brand-new Scouts BSA troop starting up. The SM and ASM are new to their roles, as am I. We have a founding group of about 5-6 Scouts to start, but as we’re the only girls’ troop serving a three-county district, we have the potential for very rapid growth over the next 2-3 years. —> What advice would you give to the SM to start off on the right foot and emphasize the patrol method? —> What can the troop committee do to support and encourage the patrol method? —> What practices can we put in place from the start that will help guide us to keep the patrol method at the forefront as we grow? Thanks!
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