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  2. Liz

    Advice for a new CC

    I love your website! Is this a template that's available for purchase or did someone donate their time and talents to create it just for your Troop? We are looking at getting our website up and running shortly and man, if we don't have to re-invent the wheel, it would make me happy!
  3. I’m the CC of a brand-new Scouts BSA troop starting up. The SM and ASM are new to their roles, as am I. We have a founding group of about 5-6 Scouts to start, but as we’re the only girls’ troop serving a three-county district, we have the potential for very rapid growth over the next 2-3 years. —> What advice would you give to the SM to start off on the right foot and emphasize the patrol method? —> What can the troop committee do to support and encourage the patrol method? —> What practices can we put in place from the start that will help guide us to keep the patrol method at the forefront as we grow? Thanks!
  4. Today
  5. Calion

    How to start a new unit

    I'm aware that this is an ooooold post, but it's still useful. In that vein, I found the "Membership Committee Guide" (33080) online.
  6. ParkMan

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Thanks @RichardB I think many are on edge these days. As I'm sure you know, there is a lot of concern about erosion of program. I'm reaidng between the lines here and am guessing we overreacted to the term "overnighter". If "overnighter" refers to the of sleeping overnight and doesn't mean that it's single overnight - great. Personally - I don't think we need more definition, I'd just remove the term overnighter. Camping implies sleeping overnight in the woods. "overnighter" suggests one night. I'd offer the terms that make the most sense to volunteers are: .den camping pack camping council organized camping Now that I read this again, I realize that there is an effort to overnghter to distinguish from day camps. I don't think it's needed. If one said "pack camping", I think we all understand that implies spending the night.
  7. RichardB

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    @Eagle94-A1 was no change in policy. More effective communication would be my analysis. Et al, do you really want to have a definition of overnight in Pack Overnighters? Asking for a friend. Just saying, on one hand, this thread says national changes the rules, on the other a call for more definition. Which is it? RichardB
  8. WisconsinMomma

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    I just came home from a two night Pack overnighter at the council camp. We were in cabins. Council will tell us if this is not approved, but since we are at a council camp, I am sure that these things are A-OK. We want our council camp facilities to be used for Scouts, they are set up very well for Cubs and the kids have a great time.
  9. ParkMan

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    This is a big deal because it directly contributes to weaker Cub Scout programming. I served in a pack where 80% of our camping trips were two nights. Occasionally we'd have a one nighter for some reason or another, but it was rare. The reason to have a two night camping trip is that it allows for a single, full day at camp. A Cub Scout wakes up at the camp, get's ready at the camp, has breakfast at the camp, does a day of activities, and so on. When you turn that into a single overnighter, then it decreases the time available for the Scout to grow more comfortable in the outdoors. This is why council cuborees do just this. In my experience, an active Cub Scout program is a great way to prepare Scouts, parents, and potential leaders for an active Scouts BSA program. We had numerous parents who had never camped join us when their sons were Tigers. We'd find them a tent, they'd scare up some sleeping bags, and away we'd go. In the process, the parents also learned a lot about camping. So, by the time their son got to Scouts BSA they'd be very comfortable outdoors. It also challenged us as a pack to know how to prepare for a big trip. We'd had gear, plenty of cooking equipment, we knew how to run an all day program. We've been around for enough years that this was built up over time. So, when that two night camping trip came up in the fall, you can rest assured that it was very well planned and executed. In fact our Cub leaders often go on to be BALOO trainers themselves because they learn how to run a well oiled Cub Scout camping trip. Maybe the BSA is really worried about Cub Scout packs who don't know how to run a two night trip. If so, then apply the correct remedy. Have "BALOO 2" or have some kind of district camper certify the unit. It's not really a hard problem to solve here. Frankly - the BSA needs to stop responding to all of this stuff by dumbing down the program. Isn't that the lesson of the Improved Scouting Program of the 70s?
  10. While true (at least in terms of REPORTED sex offenders), why does this not mean that we need to have male and female leaders on ALL outings, regardless of the gender of the youth involved? All or nearly all of the lawsuits against the BSA for previous failures to protect youth from sexual predators is from abuse against male youth. Why do they deserve less protection than female youth? Is there any particular evidence that girls are in more danger than boys from sexual predators? We do know male victims report less often than females, but not necessarily that they are victimized less.
  11. WisconsinMomma

    Advice for a new CC

    Recognize, praise and thank your volunteers often. Try not to defuse any drama and get people working together as much as possible. And have fun.
  12. WisconsinMomma

    BSA amends female adult required with female youth

    Most sex offenders are male. There are female sex offenders too, but the majority of abusers are men. Scouting needs leaders, male and female. Two-deep leadership and Youth Protection are VERY important, and parents should have full visibility into the program any time / every time they want it. It takes a village to keep kids safe.
  13. qwazse

    Pack dilemma

    Some of our troops parents hung back as Pack committee members, so don't take that option of the table if it's weighing on you. This over-assertive leader is not CC material. She needs a mentor who can gently but firmly guide her in improved communication skills. But, your bottom line is you have a CO who doesn't realize how much the pack represents them. If they did, they would lean on an employee who they trust to be a little more assertive in the "hiring and firing" of volunteers. This is probably partly your doing because you had to scramble to find a roof. No matter. Every effort the CC makes to build a better relationship with the COR will have its return in terms of getting adults to work better together.
  14. Sentinel947

    BSA amends female adult required with female youth

    It doesn't really break mine. Any time there's a man among youth (male of female), there are going to be parents that are rightfully defensive about it. Those of you who have rubbed shoulders with foreign Scout groups have seen that young adults in their 20's-30's make up a big chunk of Scout leaders. Here in the States, a combination of moving away from home for college, lack of paid time off at the beginning of careers, and "all adult men around kids must be potential pedophiles" keeps Scouting in the US from tapping into a knowledgeable and needed group of volunteers. I'm not sure what the answer is for that. Statistically men are more dangerous than women. However, statistically many child abusers are family or related to the victim. Given my demographic and situation, I do my best to educate others and enforce YPT. Not only does it protect our youth, but it's critical to protect my reputation as well. If other people have innocent lapses with YPT, they will likely be given a pass. I cannot and will not count on that. What does break my heart: We had our council camporee last weekend. I took some of the Catholic Scouts to Mass at the camporee. On the way back to our campsite one of them asked which parish church I attend. All 4 of the youth and I attend the same parish church. Our former pastor was recently suspended by the diocese for breaking the Catholic Church's version of YPT. After that news broke he was accused and charged with abuse of a minor in the 1990's before he became a Priest. Thankfully they didn't ask too many questions, (I hope they had those conversations with their parents.) Parents are right to be defensive and protective of their kids. The last few decades have proved you can't really fully trust anybody with your kids; not your Scout leaders, not the Priest, not their teachers, not their coaches and not even your own family. Parents can't remove all the adults from their kids lives, but they do need to remain vigilant. So I'm not mad at parents for having that attitude. I'm not mad that parents view people like me with suspicion. I'm not going to swim uphill against the prevailing attitudes and suspicions of the culture.
  15. WisconsinMomma

    Pack dilemma

    This is tough. I left a cub leadership role last year because a newer leader was a perfectionist who did not appreciate that others are volunteering and who make mistakes. I retired and chose to let a younger group lead and now it is in their hands. Like you my youngest is going to Boy Scouts. If i had to do it again I would have had.l a private conversation with her about realistic expectations for a volunteer group with various personalities. I was worn out and decided to go. In our case, I had just given a lot of work for a camp weekend and then felt reamed out in front of the committtee by the new person because the next pack meeting started late. But no one was communicating that time concern on that day. It was too much. I had five years in leadership and I was not going to take harsh criticism after working so hard. People need to understand that Scouting takes the cooperation of many to make it work.
  16. I have two daughters and a son. I am very protective of all of them. I think this is where YPT in the BSA can serve another beneficial purpose. In the GSUSA, the rules about male involvement have all but removed fathers from the equation. My two daughters are Girl Scouts and I have never been welcomed in their Scouting experience. It so saddens me that even my wonderful, progressive wife who is a Girl Scout leader has so totally embraced the concept that Girl Scouting is about women guiding girls through Scouting. Yet, my son's Cub Scout Pack & Scouts BSA Troop for boys have an adult leadership team that is about 40% female. It has created a wonderful environment where countless mothers, fathers, and their sons can enjoy Scouting together. It's been such a wonderfully welcoming environment that we've often had female siblings tag along. So, because of how inclusive the BSA has been, I totally get why we now have girls in the program. I also understand why the GSUSA never will have boys in their program. Now that we have introduced female Scouts, the BSA has a wonderful opportunity to provide the same welcoming environment for female youth. I will admit that I do not know numbers - but I have to imagine that a group of adult males will be just as trustworthy taking a group of girls camping as they would with female adults present. Whether it's groups of boys or girls, most Scouting units are composed of parents. Yes, at the Scouts BSA level, there are more volunteers who are either young adults or adults who's parents have aged out. But, for the most part it's parents like me who want to Scout with their children. I would love to have the opportunity to Scout with my 10 year old daughter. So, when I saw the BSA rules that required female leaders, I was very disappointed. Because I've been a Cub Scout leader, I know that the Cub program is very family involved. You absolutely have lots of both mothers & fathers present. In Scouts BSA it will be the same thing. Just as we have 40% female adults in the troop leadership team today, so too would I expect that we'll have 40% males in a troop for girls without any new BSA rules So, I see these rules a something of the BSA falling into the same trap as the GSUSA. That men are dangerous and we need women there to keep girls safe. This is an unfortunate social construct that we keep teaching generation after generation. Here the BSA can leverage all the YPT training, backgrounds checks, COR oversight, and benefit of troops with established track records to let girls and their parents know that they will be just fine with adult men taking girls camping. I feel for you @Sentinel947. Breaks my heart too to see your post. For my part, I accept the YPT rules and do embrace them to the fullest. But, I really do wish the BSA would sit down with some experts and rethink this message that they are sending to girls, mothers, and their fathers.
  17. That's just heartbreaking to me. I understand where you're coming from entirely. But IMO, we need to practice two-deep leadership and other YPT rules like the law, because that will stop the few rotten apples from doing damage, and from there practice "A Scout is Trustworthy." Yes, I'd allow my daughter to attend events without female leaders present, as long as I had faith that YPT was consistently followed in the unit. I don't worry about unit leaders preying on my daughter partly because I know they are never ever alone with her.
  18. Sentinel947

    BSA amends female adult required with female youth

    Bingo. This right here is why I will have nothing to do with female Scouts BSA troops. As a single man in his 20's, I can only be viewed by parents as a potential predator in the making, and I have no desire to deal with that.
  19. To clarify the thread title: National did not amend that requirement. They appear to have waived in this case due to the specific circumstances involved. That’s not the same as a blanket change across the board.
  20. Yesterday
  21. qwazse

    How much water?

    Leave the trailer. Hitch up a buffalo!
  22. 27 Current and former Boy Scouts from Troop 1 Southborough along with 13 adult volunteers took a “Big Trip” to Iceland in late July of 2019. Following a long-standing tradition, the scouts of Troop 1 voted for this destination in several rounds in the Winter and Spring of 2018 to take this once-every-four-years trip. The Big Trip team of five senior scouts, Anthony Zalev, Alexander Forrest, Joseph Greene, Zane Walter, and Garrett Goodney and Scoutmaster Jim Greene spent the next 14 months planning the adventure that saw the Troop camp in five different campsites and visit over 20 destinations during their 8-day adventure. Forty people made the 8-day journey that consisted of almost 5,000 miles traveled by air, 1,000 miles traveled by bus, and 70 miles travelled by foot around the beautiful country of Iceland. Our 40 adventurers camped using 25 tents in 5 separate campsites. We had 3 restaurant meals and prepared 23 meals for ourselves. We brought 6 stoves and sets of cooking equipment, we purchased two canopies in Iceland along with most of our food and consumed 24 liters of propane, 2 liters of white gas, and 2 pounds of isobutane. Our itinerary consisted of 24 activities (8 of which required a fee) and we were able to do it all for the thrifty cost of roughly $1,600 per person. Being in a foreign land with its unique topology, foods, sparse population centers, unique language, currency, and on the metric system presented a number of challenges, but it made the adventure one truly worthy of the title “Big Trip”. News story and fantastic photos: http://www.mysouthborough.com/2019/10/11/troop-1-is-eager-to-talk-about-its-iceland-adventure/ Troop 1 trip daily log with photos (pdf) <---Great read. http://www.mysouthborough.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Iceland-Troop-1-2019-Big-Trip.pdf Well done.
  23. Oldscout448

    Survey

    Good to have an older brother on the forum! I celebrated my 45th anniversary last weekend. I expected to be at our fall ordeal, but it was moved to a later date. (See the 6 month thread) I hope to live long enough to get to the 50 year mark too, but at this point, I'm not certain that the Order will.
  24. desertrat77

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    It's challenging enough to get everyone's schedule lined up to go camping. On that rare occasion when the planets/work schedules/school commitments align, we may as well camp for 2 nights. At least that used to be the thought process. Plus there is something more substantial about camping for 2 nights versus 1. These points aside, I think the larger issue is that National either cannot or will not communicate clearly, be it with the field or within its own headquarters. And when it comes to publishing coherent, consistent policy, they are marginal at best.
  25. walk in the woods

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    That's fine, but how many potential members are walking away as a result? I don't know the answer but it's >0.
  26. Eagle94-A1

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Because National is constantly changing rules. Webelos can not camp at camporee, then they can, now they can't again. Tigers can shoot BB Guns, then they cannot, now they can again. And I can go on. In my neck of the woods, council cub events are 3 days, 2 nites except resident camp. If packs do their own, they model what is done at the council level: full weekend overniters.
  27. Eagle94-A1

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Actually they did indeed change the policy back to the pre-2010 policy. I vivdly remember the restriction not being listed in BSA literature as my oldest had just become a Webelos and could camp with troops at camporee. Since the policy was removed, circa 2011, district and council camporees have had Webelos camping. Last year when the policy was reinstated council/district decided to ignore the change since the rule change came out AFTER camporee info came out and some Webelos had paid for the event. This year, we are reluctantly complying and not allowing Webelos to camp. And as a result one Troop is no attending district camporee in order to camp with their Webelos in protest of the policy change.
  28. malraux

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Perhaps even sequentially back to back overnight events… near as I can tell, the bsa National has made no such ruling that only 1 night at a time is allowed, and if they do want that to be the rule, they should make it explicit.
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  • Posts

    • I love your website! Is this a template that's available for purchase or did someone donate their time and talents to create it just for your Troop? We are looking at getting our website up and running shortly and man, if we don't have to re-invent the wheel, it would make me happy!
    • I’m the CC of a brand-new Scouts BSA troop starting up. The SM and ASM are new to their roles, as am I. We have a founding group of about 5-6 Scouts to start, but as we’re the only girls’ troop serving a three-county district, we have the potential for very rapid growth over the next 2-3 years. —> What advice would you give to the SM to start off on the right foot and emphasize the patrol method? —> What can the troop committee do to support and encourage the patrol method? —> What practices can we put in place from the start that will help guide us to keep the patrol method at the forefront as we grow? Thanks!
    • I'm aware that this is an ooooold post, but it's still useful. In that vein, I found the "Membership Committee Guide" (33080) online.
    • Thanks @RichardB I think many are on edge these days.  As I'm sure you know, there is a lot of concern about erosion of program. I'm reaidng between the lines here and am guessing we overreacted to the term "overnighter".  If "overnighter" refers to the of sleeping overnight and doesn't mean that it's  single overnight - great. Personally - I don't think we need more definition, I'd just remove the term overnighter.  Camping implies sleeping overnight in the woods.  "overnighter" suggests one night.  I'd offer the terms that make the most sense to volunteers are: .den camping pack camping council organized camping Now that I read this again, I realize that there is an effort to overnghter to distinguish from day camps.  I don't think it's needed.  If one said "pack camping", I think we all understand that implies spending the night.
    • @Eagle94-A1 was no change in policy.   More effective communication would be my analysis.  Et al, do you really want to have a definition of overnight in Pack Overnighters?   Asking for a friend.  Just saying, on one hand, this thread says national changes the rules,  on the other a call for more definition.    Which is it? RichardB  
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