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Council Relations

Discuss issues relating to Scout Councils, districts and working with professionals

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  1. Puget Sound Camps closing

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  3. Switching councils

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  4. James E. West Fellowship 1 2 3 4

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Maybe, but is there anything scouting can use for developing character that wouldn't be offensive to somebody. Even reverent is offensive to some here. At some point the Oath and Law will be changed and the pledge of allegiance discouraged.  Barry
    • You are crossing two different subjects, my example of uniform of the 1940s, 1970s and 2020 has nothing to do with a my opinion of using Native American lore in the program.  Barry
    • I agree in that I think the use of Indian lore teaches our scouts many things in many directions.  It also raises awareness of the native american cultures.  ... BUT ... when it's used as a weapon against us, it's time to ditch it.  We will have lost something special, but we lose far more in perception and membership if we keep it.
    • A lesson for every young person in scouts and beyond is how to think.  Not what to think, but how to take in information and evaluate it using critical thinking.  Logic, reasoning, careful scrutinizing and weighing a host of factors is a good habit and a lifelong skill.  The older I get, the more I don’t like or agree with some of the conclusions and am forced to reevaluate.  Sometimes I arrive at a new understanding, sometimes I’m not convinced.  But it’s a skill well worth making sure scouts, at least, Have as a basis for coming to well reasoned conclusions and choices. How they choose to apply and reconcile them to their powerful drivers them is another matter entirely. 
    • I think you've hit the nail on the head. Your experience is based on what you did in the 70s. There are a lot of people trying to make scouting work for families in the 2020s and the uniform is an issue as is the wearing of Native American regalia. I think you interpret a desire to be more relevant as being disrespectful, but that's not what it is.   To me, making uniforms more economical and practical for current scouts is essential, and dropping practices that make most Millennial age families cringe is a no brainer. The military updates uniforms constantly based on better fabrics, fit, etc., with no lack of respect for tradition. Native American regalia has always been an interesting feature of scouts but it has little to do with its core. A chunk of the early handbooks were dedicated to horsemanship. Those skills were essential then but no longer because no one leads cavalry charges anymore. BP was a dedicated horseman and cavalryman and he often wore jodhpurs. At some point, though, he quit wearing them because... well... times changed.    
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