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Council Relations

Discuss issues relating to Scout Councils, districts and working with professionals

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Europeans truly regarded the inhabitants of the New World as scarcely better than wild animals - if that, entitled to own nothing.  our diseases slaughtered indiginous peoples.  I wonder what the Kalapuya thought of the peoples they drove out of the area  or the slaves that they "owned." They must have regarded them as fellow beings as they allowed for intermarriage and adoption.   Thus, their form of slavery seems to have been far, far less oppressive than American chattel slavery. https://libraryguides.lanecc.edu/kalapuya; Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown, A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992): at p. 10. After 1829, the Klickitat Tribe invaded the Kalapuya lands and conquered much of it. "The numerically lessened Kalapuyans were by 1840 a trivial annoyance to settlers who took their lands and employed them as laborers but did not preserve for them any of their traditional homelands for their villages or for their resources needs. By 1851 there was no land in the Willamette Valley unclaimed by American settlers, who also called for the removal or genocide of all Indian peoples."  https://ndnhistoryresearch.com/tribal-regions/kalapuyan-ethnohistory/   Also of interest:  https://www.willametteheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/What-Price-Eden-PDF.pdf    
    • Al Lambert's retirement was just announced along with some consolidation. Too bad this type of info isn't given out via Scoutingwire or something.    “To: National Executive Board, Scout Executives, all National Council Employees The recent reduction in force has affected all levels of the BSA. We are disappointed to formally announce that the Assistant Chief Scout Executive - National Director of Outdoor Adventures position has been eliminated. Because of that action, Al Lambert has decided to retire and his last day will be December 31, 2020. Going forward, John Mosby will give leadership to international programs, Order of the Arrow, the National Jamboree team, and the Outdoor Program and Properties Group. Patrick Sterrett will give leadership to the four High Adventure Base Directors.   Al’s iconic tenure with the BSA is best described by the words loyal and brave as found in our Scout Law. Al was passionately loyal to his staff, volunteer teams, and the principles of the BSA. He exhibited bravery when confronted with challenges that most would avoid. He accepted the challenges across his career and rallied his teams time and time again to do things they did not think they were capable of.   His loyalty to the BSA and its people resulted in numerous promotions of his team members with several ascending to become Scout executives. Many turned to Al in their toughest and most defining moments. He believes that our movement is built on relationships, volunteer and professional alike, and he worked hard to support all who he worked with.   Al’s distinguished and remarkable 40 year BSA career started in 1980 as an Exploring executive in the Chicago Area Council in Chicago, Illinois. He continued as field director for the East Valley Area Council in Forest Hills, Pennsylvania. In June of 1990, he was selected as Scout executive of the Mason Dixon Council in Hagerstown, Maryland, and then became deputy Scout executive of the National Capital Area Council in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1998, he was chosen as Scout executive of the Daniel Webster Council in Manchester, New Hampshire, and in November of 2004, he returned to become the Scout executive of the National Capital Area Council. In February of 2010, he became the Central Region Director. In his role as Central Region Director, he was tirelessly out and about with council teams engaging with unit serving executives and councils across the region. In 2016, the Central Region held an amazing All Hands that focused on empowering new executives and connecting them to our movement. In 2017, Al was selected as the Assistant Chief Scout Executive for Outdoor Adventures. In his role as ACSE, he was known to many as the “Director of Fun” – focusing on the promise of fun and adventure in Scouting programs – from the World Jamboree to amazing high adventure programs.   Al has been married to his high school sweetheart, Patricia, for 40 years. They have two daughters, two sons-in-law (one of which is a Scout executive), and five adventurous grandchildren.   We ask you to extend your very best wishes to Al and Pat as they transition to this next phase of their lives in beautiful New Hampshire...”
    • The Cub Scout program doesn't directly utilize the OA. If you are going to be supporting your pack as a leader, save the OA until your scout joins the older group. In the mean time if you're interested in getting to know your area lodge and chapter, ask any OA member (look for the OA flap on their uniform), or call your council for contact info. I'm sure your local chapter and lodge have web sites as well, for current info. See you on the trail, sst3rd
    • Because his kids aren’t allowed in classes yet, my son is learning how to make creative videos to give his 10th graders assignments. He is doing Harry Potter characters this month. He was telling me how much fun he is having being creative. I told him now he understands why I had so much fun being a Cub Master. Cub Scout age kids don’t care about politics, political correctness and so forth. They just like a stories of adventure, fun, and humor. I made a new one each meeting. I invited the parents of different ethnics, races and cultures to help plan them. I made sure the stories were interesting and had a lot of participation for both scouts and parents to wear them out. Same ideas went behind my Scoutmaster minutes; they had to be under 2 minutes long, interesting, funny, or adventurous. Humor never failed. Kids will enjoy face painting or anything like that if you make a great story. I had a few Native American stories that were too generic to offend anyone. You will know if you’re going the right direction when the scouts aren’t talking to their neighbor. And if they do, don’t blame them, just do it better next time. That’s how I learned 2 minutes is max for troop age scouts. Have Fun being creative. Barry
    • My opinion is that generic face painting on toddlers and young elementary kids is face painting. It's fun and they like it. Painting rank or advancement based stripes on kids that are entering the older elementary grades starts to feel a little kitschy to me.   
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