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  1. Equipment Reviews & Discussions

    Discussions dealing with equipment topics (tents, lights, packs, boots, stoves, etc.)

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  2. Camp Recipes and Cooking

    Tales of Scout cooks, prized techniques and yummy recipes for gathering around the fire.

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  1. An Outing Reflection

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  2. Fire by friction

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  3. Raccoon COPE

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • As early as April 17, 1917, The Knoxville Journal and Tribune reported that the Knoxville Boy Scout Council received an offer from the Union National bank and John F. and James T. Shea, owners of the McDonald farm, to assist the Boy Scouts and provide a tract to help supplement food supplies for the war effort. read here
    • I did my Ordeal in 1993 and Brotherhood in 1994.  I was part of the Transatlantic Council, which covered Europe, essentially.  Our OA chapter was all of England, Ireland, Norway, and Iceland.  Needless to say, Chapter meetings were rare, and most of us didn't drive.  The only time the chapter got together was Ordeal weekends.  It was also a time of great upheaval with bases, and consequently, Scout troops disappearing left and right.  To sum up, I have no idea what a normal OA chapter or lodge looks like.  I'm finally getting back into Scouting with my first grader joining Cubbies.  I'd like to take an active role in the organization, if I can.  I'm just not sure what to expect.
    • Haha that’s what the lady at the Scout Shop said, too! Honestly, I’ll be happy to jump in wherever I’m needed. I haven’t bought a uniform yet, but I rounded up a bunch of old patches at my parents’ house just in case. We’re in the same Council where I was a scout, so I’m planning on rocking my 1990s CSP and early-2000s Lodge flap.  Next weekend we’re going to a one day mini-day camp at one of our Council camps. The same camp where I went to day camp, camped with my Troop, took and staffed our Council pre-NYLT course, and completed my Ordeal. The same camp where my grandfather went to summer camp.
    • Actually wrote a article for my district newsletter about this topic. Encouraging Troops to get out, use the patrol method, and follow council and local guidelines. I've copied it here:    "As our units start up fall programing during COVID 19, we are faced with a great opportunity to embrace a core aspect of the Scouting program: The Patrol Method. Robert Baden Powell was once quoted “The patrol method is not a way to operate a Boy Scout Troop, it is the only way. Unless the patrol method is in operation you don’t really have a Boy Scout Troop.” A patrol, a group of eight or so Scouts, is not just a method for organizing our Scouts.  It is a place where youth can learn new skills, practice leadership, and make new friendships. Dan Beard Council has outlined COVID 19 safety guidelines for Ohio and Kentucky under the “Restart Scouting Safely Plan.” For the full document please visit http://www.danbeard.org/scouting-restart-safely-guide-now-available/.  It details what restrictions are in place for Scouting activities based on Ohio and Kentucky Health Department regulations. At present, Scouting activities are to be limited to groups of no more than 10 people, including two-deep adult leadership. Scouts and leaders should also social distance and wear face masks when unable to maintain distancing. This may make meeting as a whole Troop challenging, but is the perfect number for patrols to meet. The patrol method is even more useful if your traditional meeting location is still closed to groups or has occupancy limits. Patrols can meet independently of the Troop at different locations or different days for activities, assuming proper two-deep leadership can be maintained. Meeting by patrol has the benefit of pushing decision making and planning down from Troop level youth leadership down to the Patrol leaders. For some Troops, this level of responsibility for Patrol Leaders is normal. For other Troops, this would be a new developmental challenge. Troop level youth leaders such as Senior Patrol Leaders or Troop Guides still have a role in assisting Patrol leaders to prepare their patrol activities and make sure each patrol has the necessary resources available. When your unit camps this fall, the Patrol method helps ensure your Scouts maintain groups of 10 or less and keeps them from congregating under common spaces like dining flies or picnic pavilions. Smaller cooking groups also have the added bonus of giving Scouts more opportunities to practice their cooking skills. It’s important for adults attending Troop or Patrol campouts to ensure safe dining practices are practiced such as eliminating self-serve buffet style meals and common water coolers. For a complete list of suggestions for dining, food prep, camping and transportation, please reference the “Restart Scouting Safely Plan.” As we enter the middle of the fall camping season, each Scouts BSA unit has a chance to utilize the Patrol method, not just to keep Scouts and Scouters safe, but also to provide a great small group program for our Scouts."
    • FWIW - when we did it, it was tied to rank.  We also didn't paint the entire face, more put marks on their cheeks.  Basically, we matched the color of the program: Tiger - orange Wolf - yellow Bear - blue Webelos - green & red AOL - green, red, & yellow    
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