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    Discussions dealing with equipment topics (tents, lights, packs, boots, stoves, etc.)

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • @TheFlyingMum, welcome. The CC kicked the autistic kid out of the troop? Why? What was the CC doing to the scout with Bell's Palsy? And who did what to the autistic scout? This just sounds over the top. I've had scouts on the autism spectrum in my troop and the other scouts were really good with them. So I know it can be done right.
    • You are correct that this issue crosses liberals and conservatives. My main point should have been emphasized that the door swings only one way (against boys). This comes at a time when boys are clearly the group failing in our society and nobody cares. Nobody. Silence. Crickets. Any expression of support for boys and their unique needs is tagged with labels of sexism, chauvinism, and patriarchy. The fact that BSA is now abandoning its mission for boys under the banner of inclusion saddens me beyond belief.
    • I am betting that the "outside of Scouting" is to reign in those units that violate BSA policies by saying it is a "bunch of families camping" and "it's a bunch of friends playing paintball."
    • @Paperwork welcome to scouter.com
    • The issue is one of Troop culture.  Culture begins with the leaders.  The older Scouts take their cues from the leaders.  The younger Scouts take their cue from the older Scouts. Our Troop has a Scout with on the Autism spectrum, a Scout who is Downs Syndrome and a Scout who is in a wheelchair due to spinal cord issues that affect his ability to walk and use one of his arms.  The Scout on the Autism spectrum does need more adult interaction than the others.  The older Scouts (who are his same age) have been taught how to support him by treating him as an equal.  The Scout with Downs Syndrome became best buddies with our ASPL last year at camp and one of the younger Scouts was his "buddy" all week.  Honestly, he is a rock star when he comes to meetings.  The Scout in a wheelchair just joined our Troop and has been befriended by the other ASPL (who is my son).  He quote is "it is so cool he is into Scouting, I want to make sure he succeeds."  Our Troop's culture is that every kid who joins a a Webelos is treated as a little brother.  This has been the way since 10 years ago, a bunch of youth decided to make the patrols mixed age when they become the senior leaders, because they were remembered what it was like to be excluded by the "cool" guys when they joined.   One of the things we do is cover "bullying" in our leadership training.  We explain that what one person thinks is funny and a joke, may not be a joke to the person it is aimed at.  The question isn't whether you thought it was funny, but whether the other person also thought it was funny.  We define "friendly" to be  from the perspective of the other person.  Don't get me wrong, there still is a lot of razzing on folks, but everyone involved knows it is in good fun.   I have a saying that everyone needs Scouting for a reason.  Some to enjoy high adventure, some to learn leadership, some to learn self-responsibility, some to have a place that they feel like they are among friends, some to have a place to goof off, some to find self-confidence, etc.  If the adult leadership approaches it from that perspective, the rest comes easy.
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