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Working with Kids

Counseling, inspiring and teaching kids.

809 topics in this forum

  1. Discipline Peoblems?

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  2. Angels with dirty faces?

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  3. Why is he here?

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  4. Disciplinary action

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  5. Images

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  6. We band of brothers?

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Tent with my son on an outing??  That would mean that we would need to speak with other on an outing, possibly make eye contact, and horrors, he would need to acknowledge that he knows me and potentially have interaction with me. As none of those are going to happen, the whole tenting together is not happening.  Plus he has BO and talks in his sleep.
    • This topic has been about interactions outside of scouting.  I think you are making the same mistake as BSA when you confuse the two things.  There is a big difference between regulating activities at a unit campout and trying to control people's interactions outside of scouting.  
    • I flip back and forth on this.  My experience is that scouting units (packs, troops) need relatively light policy and procedure documents.  Document habits.  When do you meet?  How much are dues and when?  How do you share fundraiser profits?  ... A new parent guide ... Beyond that, I find little need to document policies and procedures.  RECOMMENDATION:  Resolve the situation first.  Then, outside the situation, discuss whether a policy is needed.  I've sat in too many committee meetings where hours are spent debating a well written policy that is driven by one or two situations.  Then, after the incident is done, we never touch the policy again.  It's never published.  It's never communicated again.  It really turns out it was a policy for this one incident.   My conclusion:  Don't create policy during problem situations.  You will often end up with policy that you don't want to live with and that others won't follow.  Queue a policy discussion for later, but don't create the new policy during the situation.  Policies written during situations often become bad policy.  Sometimes I wonder if discussing policy is the passive aggressive way to handle bad situations that are really best handled clean and upfront.    
    • OK, then how about this rule. So, you are on a Scouts, BSA camp out and decide that you are going to tent with your son (we've had this come up with camping in my area due to COVID). Are you therefore indicating that you'll ignore the rule and tent with your son?    
    • I agree. Ambiguous rules or not, BSA cannot tell immediate family members that they can't be one to one. 
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