Jump to content

Working with Kids

Counseling, inspiring and teaching kids.

802 topics in this forum

  1. Lying

    • 40 replies
    • 1476 views
  2. The male mystic

    • 40 replies
    • 2208 views
    • 40 replies
    • 5576 views
    • 40 replies
    • 2736 views
    • 39 replies
    • 1037 views
  3. When is enough, enough?

    • 39 replies
    • 1221 views
    • 39 replies
    • 1396 views
    • 39 replies
    • 1392 views
  4. Two deep and driving

    • 38 replies
    • 8379 views
    • 37 replies
    • 2535 views
  5. Lying

    • 37 replies
    • 1299 views
    • 37 replies
    • 973 views
    • 37 replies
    • 1258 views
  6. Scoutmaster Attitude

    • 37 replies
    • 2367 views
  7. ADHD Problem

    • 36 replies
    • 2819 views
  • LATEST POSTS

    • Only on tents with pole sleeves. LOL, Yes, I forgot to mention I don’t like backpacking tents with pole sleeves. My first tent with pole sleeves taught me to stay away from them because the inside of the tent gets wet while setting up. Freestanding tents also handle strong 3 am wind and rain better.  Barry
    • Most scouts should just use the Philtents at Philmont.  Younger and less experienced scouts would be happier with traditional tents for their own tent. I posted this mostly for adults who want their own tent, but my son used a silnylon MLD Duomid with matching inner at Philmont.  He and another skinny scout fit OK in it.  
    • An advantage of most non-freestanding tents is that they set up "dry".  Freestanding tents typically have you set up the inner mesh first.  If it's raining, then the inside of your tent gets wet. All single wall and most double wall trekking pole tents can be set up as one piece (or the fly first) so the inside is dry. It is true that they require more skill and practice to set up.  They're for adults and older, experienced scouts.

      A two person tent is good with doors on both sides, I agree.  A single person tent can get by with just 1.
    • If the poles were in your pack, then they'd be be useless as trekking poles.  There are frameless packs that use a sit pad to provide some weight transfer to the hips.  These are not meant for heavier loads.  There are lighter framed packs like my Zpacks Arc Haul (23 ounces, 62 liters) as well as ones from Hyperlite Mountain Gear, ULA, Seek Outside and others.  My son used the new REI Flash 55 pack that is very light. You have to have very compact gear and not overpack if you go with a pack that size.

      Adults can use a solo tent. I did this past summer and was glad I did.  I'm 6'3" and 200 pounds.  The REI solo tent is a similar size.  You're not taking much into your tent, so you don't need much room.  If you have an odd number of scouts, one scout (typically an older one) can tent solo, too.

      Most trekking pole tents like the Tarptent one I used do not come with poles.  You can purchase poles separately.
    • Interesting.  I was involved in a lawsuit in another organization where the organization's policies were not clear. I think you have some modicum of protection, regardless of national policies or lack of clarity, if you clearly make it a well publicized policy of your own local chapter(unit) to require any adult involved with youth to complete YPT before participating in any local unit event or they will be asked to leave.
  • Who's Online (See full list)

×